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Publication numberUS2688268 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1954
Filing dateMar 31, 1953
Priority dateMar 31, 1953
Publication numberUS 2688268 A, US 2688268A, US-A-2688268, US2688268 A, US2688268A
InventorsEarl B Lear
Original AssigneeChicago Pneumatic Tool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stoper drill with rotary impact attachment
US 2688268 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 7, 1954 E. B. LEAR 2,688,258

' STOPER DRILL WITH ROTARY IMPACT mom-mm Filed March 51, 1955 3 SheefiruSheet l INVENTOR 59a: 5. 54,?

ATTORNEY Sept. 7, 1954 R 2,688,268

STOPER DRILL WITH ROTARY IMPACT ATTACHMENT Filed March 31, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR 484 5 154%.

ATTORNEY Sept. 7, 1954 E. B. LEAR STOPER DRILL WITH ROTARY IMPACT ATTACHMENT 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 31, 1955 INVENTOR BY W WATTORNEY a r lrllll. I 0." I I I I 7 t L U Patented Sept. 7, 1954 STOPER DRILL WITH ROTARY IMPACT ATTACHMENT Earl B. Lear, Utica, N. Y., assignor to Chicago Pneumatic Tool Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey Application March 31, 1953, Serial No. 345,763

12 Claims. 1

This invention relates to drilling and bolting apparatus and more particularly, to a rock drill of the stoper type including an attachment for providing rotary impacts, such as would be useful Iion the tightening or loosening of threaded memers.

The stoper drill and attachment of the inven" tion will be found especially useful in a certain phase of mining operations, namely, the placement of suspension roof supports. Much attention has recently been given to the use of suspension roof supports in tunnelling operations, especially in coal mines. Such a method of supporting a mine roof has many advantages over the conventional timbering method, not only from the standpoint of mining efiiciency and resulting economies, but also for the manner in which accident hazard is greatly reduced. Briefly, the suspension roof sup port method comprises the use of metal rods which are inserted in the tunnel roof and are anchored in areas which are not likely to be stressed or disturbed in the tunnelling operations. Bearing plates, which are next applied to the exposed end of the rods, are drawn tightly against the roof of the tunnel by means, such as nuts. If desired, channel irons, which are held in position by several anchored rods, can be substituted for the bearing plates, so as to give support to a greater roof area. In this type of roof support many different forms of anchor bolts have been devised. One common type of bolt, or stud, is a one inch rod, 4 to 6 feet long which is split on one end while the other end is provided with a thread to fit a standard nut.

The use of the stoper drill and rotary impact attachment of the invention, provides a convenient means for the placing of suspension roof supports, since the rock drill can be used for first drilling the holes for the rods, then after the rods have been anchored in the holes, the rotary impact attachment can be fixed to the drill and the nutsrun on the anchored rods so that the bearing plates or channel irons can be drawn tightly against the tunnel roof. Hence, the need for two separate tools, i. e., a drill and an impact wrench, with separate power hoses or lines for each, can be eliminated, since the device of the invention serves a dual purpose.

An object of this invention is to provide a stoper drill and rotary impact attachment for drilling and tightening operations, which will obviate the need for two separate tools, with their respective supply lines, for such drilling and tightening operations.

Another object of this invention is to provide a stoper drill and rotary impact attachment whereby the longitudinal impacts of the drill are utilized to produce a rotary impact motion in the attachment, for tightening operations.

A further object is to provide a stoper drill and rotary impact attachment, which will be found especially useful in the placement ofsuspension roof supports in tunnelling operations.

A still further object is to facilitate release of the rifle bar rotation in the stoper drill either for the purpose of starting a drill hole on the uneven surface of the rock, when interruption of rotation is desirable, or for enabling the stoper drill to be converted readily into an impact wrench. A feature of this invention is a ratchet ring provided with notches on its periphery which are engageable with a locking device under manual control.

Still another object of this invention is to provide 'a stoper drill and rotary impact attachment, which is simple in design, convenient to operate, economical from the standpoint of first cost and regular use, and of rugged construction and long life.

These and further objects of the invention will appear more apparent from a study of the following specification and related drawings, in

which:

Fig. l is a side elevation View of the stoper drill and rotary impact attachment of the invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged cross section of the drill as seen from line 22 in Fig. 1, illustrating the rotation release mechanism;

Fig. 3 is a view of the top or front end of the drill as seen from line 33 in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged longitudinal section taken and the detent arrangement for yieldingly locking it in adjusted position;

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a release pawl, as used in the stoper drill of Fig. 1;

Fig. 9 is an isometric view of an end portion of a cam, as used in the stoper drill of Fig. 1;

Fig. 10 is an end view on a still larger scale of a rotary impact attachmentof the invention;

Fig. 11 is a longitudinal section view of the rotary impact attachment of the invention, as seen from line H--!| in Fig.

Fig. 12 is a fragmentary section view illustrating a retaining pin used in the rotary impact attachment of the invention, as seen from line |2-|2 inFig.1l;

Fig. 13 'isan isometric view of a portion of a rotation anvil, as used in the rotary impact attachment of the invention;

Fig. 14 is a portion of an end. view of a housing used in the device of Fig. 11;

Fig. 15 is a fragmentary sectional view of the same as indicated by the arrows IS in Fig. 14;

Fig. 16 is a cross-section as" seen from line Iii-l6 in Fig. 11;

Fig. 17 is a cross-section as seen from-line ||l'| in Fig. 11;

Fig. 18 is ,a longitudinal view of a wedge type rod driver for use with the1-drill of the invention.

Fig. 19 is a longitudinal sectional view taken through the drill of Fig. 1, but with the drill arranged for drilling operations as shown in Fig. 4, and is drawn in an enlarged scale.

Referring'now to the drawings, Fig. 1 illustrates a rock drill of the stoper type having a front-head portion 20, a cylinder or main body portion 2| and a backhead 22, all of which are secured together by draw' bolts 23 arranged on each side of the drill. The front head portion *supports a feed leg cylinder 24, which extends parallel to the axis of the drill, and contains a reciprocable piston 25, which is pointed at its lower or rearward extremity. A feed leg control-valve 26a arranged within the body of the drill, is operated by handle means 26 to cause flow of compressed air into theforward end of the feed leg cylinder 24, via passageway 24a to force: piston 25 rearwardly, or out of the cylinder, which results in forward movement of the drill, assuming that the pointed end of the piston is abutting an immovable body, for example the flooriof the mine tunnel. A'handle 21, for carrying or supporting the drill, may be aflixed there-' is shown in Fig. 4, and a rifle bar having a helical splined portion, which engages the hammer piston. The rear end of the rifle bar has a head 3| containing pawls 32, which are resiliently maintained by spring loaded detents 32a to engage slots 330 formed in a ratchet ring 33 supported in a cavity in' the backhead 22. As the piston 29 reciprocates, it is given a step-by-step rotation, due to the helical connection between the piston 29 and rifle bar 30, operating in conjunction with the pawl and ratchet arrangement, all as is well known in the art. The intermittent rotative movements of the piston are transmitted through a chuck 33a which has a splined connection with the piston and. which is mounted in the front head 20. The front end of the chuck has a bushing 33b arranged to support a drillsteel 34 non-rotatively in the chuck whereby the drill steel is arranged to partake of the step by step rotation of the piston. An automatic distributing valve 35a is arranged within the drill on an exterior. portion 35 of the main bodyportion 2|, and a throttle valve 36, positioned in the backhead 22, is operable by handle means-31 to admit compressed air from an air line. 38, to the automatic valve, which directs the air in a manner to cause the hammer piston 29 to reciprocate within the drill. A water tube 39 centrally arranged within the drill, is adapted to conduct water to the drill steel during drilling operations, as is common practice in a drill of the s'toper type. An oil reservoir 4|, having a metering passageway arrangement 42, connecting with a cavity containing the throttle valve 36, is provided for the admission of minute particles of'oil to the live air for lubricating the drill.

A rotation release arrangement is provided to permit selective operation the rock drill without rotation of the drill steel 34. This rotation release arrangement includes a cam shaft 43 which is rotatably mounted within the backhead 22', the inner end of the shaft having a cam 44, which is adapted-to operate a pawl 45, slidably positioned within the backhead. As seen in Fig. 8, the pawl 45 is of slablike proportions and has a recessed section providing-a shoulder 46 on one side thereof. Ratchet ring 33' is adapted to rotate within the backhead, and has on its outer periphery a plurality of notches or slots 41. The pawl 45, in locked position, is resiliently maintained sothat one end thereof engages one of the slots '41 of the ratchet ring. In such locked condition, the ratchet ring providesa rigid abutment for the pawls 32 to operate against, resulting. in the step-by-step rotation of the piston 29' and drill steel 34, as heretofore set forth. When the cam shaft 43 is rotated 90 from the position shown in Figs; 2 and 5, the cam 44 by virtue of engagement with shoulder 46 will maintain the end of pawl 45 out of engagement with slots 41 of the ratchet ring 33. In such unlocked condition the ratchet ring will be free to rotate or oscillate within the backhead and will not provide a rigid abutment for the pawls 32 to operate against, hence, rotation of the drill steel will not occur.

ing theratchet ring 33, will oscillate as the hammer. piston 29 is caused to reciprocate.

A handle 48 is keyed to the cam shaft 43 to provide for the convenient rotation thereof, and an indexing pin 49 is resiliently arranged to abut detents formed on an exterior portion of the cam shaft, to maintain the latter in either rotation releaselocked or unlocked condition.

The rotary impact attachment 28, as seen in Fig. 11, includes a housing 50, which is threaded at one end to receive a housing cap 5|, and is adapted to surround and support for rotation, a ratchet ring 52 which has a square-sided extension 53. Positioned within the ratchet ring 52-is a rifie'bar nut 54 which has four pawl members 55 equally spaced, the outer end of each being resiliently maintained, by rubber inserts 56 or equivalent, in engagement with notches or teeth 51, arranged about the inner surface of the ratchet ring 52. On the inner surface of the rifle bar nut 54 are four spiral equi-spaced grooves 58; which are adapted to receive spline members 59formed on a head portion 6| of a rotation anvil 62. The rotation anvil has a hexagonal shank'portion 63 which extends through a hexagonal hole formed in the housing cap 5|, and is of length. sufficient to enter into the chuck bushing 33b in front head portion 20 of the drill, to engage with the hammer piston 29, in the manner'of the drill steel 34.

A compression spring 64, centered at one end" in a cavity 65 formed in the head portion El and at the other end in'a cavity 66 formed in the extension 53, urges the head portion 6| of the It will be seen that in the latter con-- dition, the rifle bar and associated parts includ-- rotation anvil 62 in the direction of the housing cap 5|. Affixed to the extension 53, is a driving head BI which has a shank portion 68 adapted for coupling with a removable socket 68a for engaging the nut or bolt to be rotated. A rubber cushion 69 is maintained within the driving head El for absorbing the axial blows which occur in the use of the impact attachment during a nut tightening operation. The cushion thus serves to prevent shattering of the roof shale or rock surrounding the bolt hole. The driving head BI is maintained on the extension 53 by means of a pin H which extends through an elongated hole 12 formed in the extension 53, the ends of the pin H engaging holes in the driving head 61, as shown. A split metal band 13 is positioned within a groove formed on the exterior of the driving head 51, to maintain the pin H in position. A lubricant connection 14 is positioned in the ratchet ring 52 for the lubrication of the various movable parts included in the assembly.

At the threaded end of the housing 50 are arranged sixteen radial slots 15, of the same width as seventeen radial slots Hi formed in a flang like portion of the housing cap 5!.

A circumferential groove 11 is formed on the exterior of the housing 50 and the flange-like portion of the housing cap 5|, to overlap the slots I5 and It. A split metal band 18, having a hook '39 at one end, is arranged within the groove if so that the hook l9 enters into one of the slots 15 and 16. In this manner, the threaded connection between the housing 50 and housing cap 5| is positively locked.

The housing cap at has a cylindrical projection 8! on the lower or rear side, which is of such proportions as to flt into a cavity 82 provided in the front head portion 20 of the drill. A pair of pins 83 are diammetrically arranged about the projection 8| of the housing cap 5|, in a manner as to engage recesses 84 formed in the front head portion 20, as best seen in Fig. 3. The pins 83 and recess 84 arrangement prevent the rotary impact attachment 28 from turning after it is in position on the drill.

It will be seen from a study of the arrangement of the rotary impact attachment 28 as described above, that with the assembly in position on the drill, each blow of the hammer piston 29 of the drill, against the end of the shank 63 of anvil 52, will drive the anvil forward and the rifle nut E i will be given a rotary motion, due to the splined connection between the latter two elements. This rotary motion will be transmitted to the ratchet ring 52, by virtue of the pawls 55 in engagement with the notches 5! of the ratchet ring, thus the driving head 67, connected to the ratchet extension 53, will be rotated, as well as the socket which is afflxed thereto and which engages a driven nut. The reactive force of the anvil 62 acting upon the rifle nut 5 to cause rotation of the ratchet ring 52, is transferred to the housing cap 5|, by the hexagonal shank 63 of the anvil 52 working in the hexagonal hole 60, and then to the drill, by way of the pin 83 and recess 84 arrangement between the rotary impact attachment and the ,front head portion 20, and is resisted by the operator of the drill, either manually or by flxing the drill in operative position. Upon completion of its forward thrust the anvil 62 is restored to its normal or rearward position by the compression spring 64. During such rearward movement the splined portion 59 on the anvil rotates the rifle nut 54 in a direction opposite to that which occurred during the power stroke. Such backward or restorative turning movement of the rifle nut is not transmitted to the ratchet ring 52 or to the tool head 61 because of the disposition of the pawls 55 as will be apparent from Fig. 16. Thus, the rifle nut is caused to oscillate in response to the reciprocations of the anvil, and during each power stroke turns the ratchet ring through a distance equal to I, 2 or 3 ratchet teeth, depending on whether the nut fits tightly or turns freely on the bolt.

The rotary impact attachment 28 is shown for right-hand rotation; if left-hand rotation is desired, it would be necessary to provide parts having a reverse slope of the anvil splines 59 and the mating grooves 58 of the nut 54, as well as a change in the operative direction of the pawls 55.

When the drill is used for drilling operations, it is arranged as shown in Figs. 2 and 4, namely, the rotation release arrangement is locked, and the drill steel 34 is in position in the front head portion 20.

After the holes have'been drilled in the roof and the bolts driven and anchored therein, the drill is used for nut tightening operations. For this purpose it is then arranged as shown in Fig. 1, namely, the rotary impact attachment 28 is in position on the front head portion 20, with the anvil 63 in the stoper chuck and the rotation release cam shaft 53, is turned so that the cam 44 is in position shown in Fig. 6. A washer plate 90 of suitable dimension, for example 8 inches square and 4 inch thick, is placed on the rod 86a together with a nut 9|. The rotary impact at tachment drives the nut extremely tight, thereby actually bending the plate to conform to the uneven contour of the rough face of the roof rock.

While the impact wrench of the present invention is designed especially for tightening or loosening nuts on roof support bolts in mines, it has other applications, for example in the erection or dismantling of heavy equipment.

In Fig. 18 is shown a wedge type rod driver 85, which may serve as an auxiliary part in suspension roof support placement operations. The driver has a threaded portion 86 for engagement with the end threaded rod 86a to be anchored in the drilled hole, and a shank portion Bl, which is of cylindrical shape, and which is placed in the chuck bushing 33b of the drill, in the manner of the drill steel 34. The impacts of the hammer piston 23 upon the end of the shank 8'5, quickly drives the rod to anchored position within the roof tunnel hole.

What is claimed is:

1. In a device. of the character described, an assembly including a reciprocable hammer piston arranged to deliver impact blows to an element supported by the assembly, a rotation arrangement for rotating the supported element, means to disengage said rotation arrangement to prevent rotation of the supported element, and a rotary impact attachment connectable to the assembly for utilizing the impact blows of the hammer piston to deliver rotary impact blows.

2. In a device of the character described, an assembly including a reciprocable hammer piston arranged to deliver impact blows to an element supported by the assembly, a rotation arrangement for rotating the supported element, disengaging means operable to disengage said rotation arrangement to prevent rotation of the supported element, and a rotary impact attachment positionable in part within said assembly and'adapte upon operation of. said disengaging means; to. utilize the impact blows of. the hammer piston to. deliver rotary impact blows.

3. A device according to claim 2, wherein said rotary impact attachment comprises a housing arrangement adapted to be maintained, in, fixed position relative said assembly, a first rotatable member supported by said housing arrangement and having an extension adapted to receive socket means, a second rotatable member enclosed by the first rotatable member and having a plurality of pawl members engageable with the first rotatable member for rotary driving connection in a given direction, a reciprocably arranged driving; element positioned in part within the housing and having a portion adapted to receive impact blows and a portion having helical splines for engaging with grooves on the second rotatable member whereby movement of the driving element in a forward direction as a result of an impact blow will cause rotation of the second rotat-- able member, and resilient means compressively. arranged between the extension of the first rotatable member and the helical splined portion of the driving element.

4; A rotary impact attachment comprising a housing arrangement adapted to be maintained in relatively fixed position, a ratchet ring rotatably supported by said housing arrangement and having a plurality of notches on an innerperiphery and an extension adapted to receive a socket means, a rifle bar nut arranged within the ratchet ring and having a plurality of pawl members pivotally connected thereto a free end of each of the pawl members engaging the notches of the ratchet ring so that the ratchet ring may be rotated in a given direction, an anvil member positioned in part within the housing for reciprocal movement and having a shank portion adapted to receive impact blows and a portion having helical splines for engaging with grooves formed on an inner periphery of the rifle barnut whereby movement or" the anvil member in a forward direction as a result of an impact blow will cause rotation of the rifle bar nut, and a compression spring arranged between the ratchet ring extension and the helical splined portion of the anvil member.

5. A rotary impact attachment according to claim 4 wherein a cushioning means is positioned between the ratchet extension and the socket means to absorb compressive shock resulting from an impact blow on the anvil member.

6. A rotary impact attachment according to claim 5 wherein the housing arrangement includes a housing element and a housing cap element threadably connected therewith, and a looking arrangement for maintaining said elements in connected condition comprising a split ring which is positioned in a peripheral groove formed in part on each of said elements, said ring having a hook; at one end which engages slot means:

formed in each of said elements.

is fixed against rotary movement with respect the housing cap.

8. A device according to claim 2, wherein the rotation arrangement includes a rotatable rifle bar having a head portion carrying a plurality of pivoted pawl members, a rotatable member surrounding the head portion and having a groove means on an inner and outer periphery thereof, said pawl members being resiliently arranged to engage grooves of the inner groove means.

9. A device according to claim 8, wherein the disengaging means comprises a disengaging pawl reciprocably arranged so that one end thereof can be moved into a groove on the outer periphery of the rotatable member and prevent the latter from rotating, and a manually operable cam arrangement for moving the disengaging pawl out of engagement with a groove on said outer groove means.

10. In a stoper drill, a reciprocating hammer piston, a rotation mechanism for turning the piston and including a rifle bar having a head portion carrying a plurality of pivoted pawls, a ratchet ring surrounding the head portion and pawls, and having notches on its inner and outer periphery, said pawls being resiliently arranged to engage the notches on the inner periphery of the ratchet ring to permit relative rotation in one direction only between the rifle bar and ratchet ring, and means for disabling the rotation means to permit the hammer piston to reciprocate ring, yieldable means for moving the disengaging pawl toward the ratchet ring, and a manually operable cam for moving the disengaging pawl in the opposite direction in opposition to said yieldable means.

11. A stoper according to claim 10, in which the disengaging pawl has a flat shape and is mounted for rectilinear movement in a direction approximately tangent to the periphery of the ratchet ring.

12. A stoper according to claim 11, in which the disengaging pawl is recessed to receive the operating portion of the manipulative cam.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,459,402 Johnson June 19, 1923 2,086,261 Douglass July 6, 1937 2,263,736 Lear Nov. 25, 1941 2,271,803 Pfeiffer et al Feb. 3, 1942 2,300,392 Austin Nov. 3, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1459402 *May 19, 1921Jun 19, 1923Thomas V StandiferScrew-bolt-nut-tightening means
US2086261 *Jun 22, 1936Jul 6, 1937Independent Pneumatic Tool CoHammer wrench
US2263736 *Jun 9, 1939Nov 25, 1941Cleveland Pneumatic Tool CoPortable tool
US2271803 *May 26, 1939Feb 3, 1942Kuhn John QAttachment tool for reciprocating hammers
US2300392 *Apr 15, 1940Nov 3, 1942Chris G AustinScrew driver
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2755069 *Feb 18, 1955Jul 17, 1956Mosby Arnold MRotation mechanism for rock drills
US2844982 *Jun 21, 1956Jul 29, 1958Swenson Oscar JRatchet-type, manually actuated, rotary impact tool
US2872835 *Aug 6, 1957Feb 10, 1959Talkington Harry WRoof bolt extractor machine
US2905442 *May 27, 1954Sep 22, 1959Chicago Pneumatic Tool CoWater shut-off and rotation release for stopers
US2910901 *Apr 11, 1955Nov 3, 1959Atlas Copco AbPneumatic bolt applying and tightening tool
US2914978 *Dec 9, 1958Dec 1, 1959Crick Leonard ERatchet type rotary impact tool
US2947931 *Dec 24, 1956Aug 2, 1960Texaco IncMotor control systems
US2954714 *Nov 12, 1958Oct 4, 1960Swenson Oscar JManually actuated rotary impact tool
US3044448 *Apr 6, 1959Jul 17, 1962Joy Mfg CoDual rotation for rock drills
US3108506 *Oct 21, 1960Oct 29, 1963Swenson Oscar JRotary impact tools
US3156309 *Dec 12, 1960Nov 10, 1964Swenson Oscar JRotary impact tools
US3392793 *Mar 29, 1967Jul 16, 1968Ingersoll Rand CoImpact tool torque limiting control
US4520697 *Sep 29, 1982Jun 4, 1985Moetteli John BRatchet wrench
US4602534 *Oct 8, 1985Jul 29, 1986Moetteli John BRatchet wrench
DE1190419B *May 8, 1957Apr 8, 1965Atlas Copco AbGesteinsbohrmaschine mit einem Handgriff und Steuerventilen am hinteren Ende und angelenkter Vorschubvorrichtung
Classifications
U.S. Classification173/93.7, 192/45.1, 173/96, 173/210, 81/60, 173/112
International ClassificationE21B19/087
European ClassificationE21C11/00