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Publication numberUS2688346 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1954
Filing dateFeb 11, 1950
Priority dateFeb 11, 1950
Publication numberUS 2688346 A, US 2688346A, US-A-2688346, US2688346 A, US2688346A
InventorsEngland August J
Original AssigneeEngland August J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lens rim forming apparatus
US 2688346 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 7, 1954 A. J. ENGLAND LENS RIM FORMING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 11 1950 My I I I I I Sept. 7, 1954 A. J. ENGLAND 2,688,346

7 LENS RIM FORMING APPARATUS Filed Feb. 11, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 28 I 85 1, 0 I i ""T""- IN V EN TOR.

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Patented Sept. 7, 1954 -UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 4 Claims.

This invention relates to an apparatus for forming lens rims, particularly lens rims for ophthalmic mountings.

A usual method of forming rims of the above character comprises helically winding a length of rim wire on a cylindrical arbor. The coil formed is removed from the winding arbor, positioned on a slitting arbor and slit axially of the arbor to sever the coil into individual pieces, which in the present instance consists of one full turn of the wire about the arbor. The slitting arbor is made larger than the coiling arbor so as to frictionally engage and tension said coil thereon whereby to firmly hold the coil when being severed into rim pieces. The rim pieces are thereafter removed from said slitting arbor and by suitable apparatus are individually bent to the required shape which is usually of an irregular contour. The above method of forming lens rims is relatively slow because of the several separate operations, which are usually performed on separate machines.

The general object of this invention is to improve upon the above manner of forming lens rims to the end that the number of operations and cost of manufacture may be materially reduced.

A more specific object of this invention is the provision of an' apparatus which will be automatic in its operation of coiling rim material into the desired shape and severing the coil into rim pieces all in a continuous operation.

Another object of this invention is the provision of an apparatus as stated in the preceding object which will be also operable to position the rim pieces in juxtaposition along a collecting member.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an apparatus for forming lens rims so constructed as to be operable to move the turns of the coil, as formed, to a severing station to be served from the coil into rim pieces.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction, as will be more fully described and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of an apparatus for forming lens rims embodying my invention;

Figure 2 is a central longitudinal sectional view of a fragmental portion of the apparatus shown in Figure 1 taken substantially along line 2-2 of Figure 3;

Figure 3 is a plan view of the fragmental portion of the apparatus shown in Figure 2;

2 Figure 4 is a sectional view taken substantially along line 4-4 of Figure t Figure 5 is a view similar to that shown in Figure 4 with several elements omitted and shown in the position wherein a lens rim piece is being severed from the coil and the ends thereof bent to form the temple attaching mounting;

Figure 6 is a sectional view showing a fragmental portion of a constructional detail;

Figure 7 is a side view of a lens rim piece of a style formed on the apparatus above described;

Figure 8 is a central longitudinal sectional view of a fragmental portion of a modified apparatus;

Figure 9 is a sectional view taken substantially along line 9-4) of Figure 8 with certain portions thereof omitted for clearance;

Figure 10 is a central longitudinal sectional view of a further modification;

Figure 11 is a sectional view taken substantially through line I ll I of Figure 10; and

' Figure 12 is a sectional view taken substantially along line l2l2 of Figure 10 showing a fragmental sectional view of a construction detail. I

In carrying out my invention, I provide a former or arbor which may be rotated by a suitable source of power, for example, the live spindle of a metal or wood turning lathe. A portion of this arbor is made in cross section to conform to the present styling of eye glass lens. The'lens rim material is helically wound in a coil aboutthis said portion of the arbor. Provision is made for slidably moving the coil as the same is being formed to a location on the arbor where severing means, carried by the arbor, sever the end turn of the coil forming a rim piece which is sufficiently complete, for some particular style of ophthalmic mounting, for the temple mounting to be attached thereto. The rim pieces as severed from the coiled wire, slide from the arbor into juxtaposition on a collecting member which eliminates subsequent sorting of the lens pieces for further operations thereon.

Referring to the drawings for a more detailed description of the invention, l5 designates generally an apparatus for forming lens rims R having a contour as illustrated in Figure '7 and with end portions of the rim piece R turned outwardly for further operation thereon to shape the same for attaching a particular style of temple mounting. The apparatus comprises an arbor l6 (Figure 4) the central portion ll of which in cross section conforms to the shape and size of the inner edge of the finished lens rim. The portion I! terminates at one end in a reduced cylindrical portion [8 and at the other end ina portion H) which has a flange 2E. The portion [9 is in cross section similar to that of portion H, but is of a larger dimension providing a shoulder 2| between said portions. The arbor is rotatable by means of a cylindrical extension 22 which projects axially from the flanged end of the arbor and may be attached to any suitable power source, for example, the live spindle 23 of a lathe, as by means of a coupling connection 24.

In order to provide stock at the ends of the lens rim R for attachment of the temple mounting, a longitudinal recess 25 is provided in the arbor [6 to receive a bar 25. The bar 25 is secured in position in any appropriate manner, such as by frictional engagement with the walls of the recess. The bar 25 extend radially outwardly from the arbor with the outer side portions 21 thereof converging toward each other in a V formation providing a forming tool and anvil for a purpose to be hereinafter described. An annulus 28 (Figure 2), the bore of which is shaped to correspond to the shape of portion 11 but of a slightly larger dimension, loosely encircles said portion H and is adapted to abut against the shoulder 2l.

The rim wire W (Figs. 1 and 3) is led from a suitable source of supply (not shown) through a tensioning and guide device 25) (Fig. 3), thence to the arbor at a location adjacent to the annulus 28 and is manually wound a few turns about the portion l! to secure the same thereto. Upon rotation of the arbor, the same will draw the wire W through the tensioning device and helically coil the same in a continuous manner about the portion IT. The wire W is passed through a lubricating device 30 prior to being drawn through the tensioning device 29.

In the present disclosure the guide device 29 (Fig. 3) is held stationary and the coil C as formed on the arbor is advanced toward the free end of said arbor by means of a wedge-like member 3! (Fig. 3) which is received between the flange 2!! and the annulus 28 and in contact with the periphery of portion [9. The wedge 3| is carried by a generally vertical lever 32, the lower end of which is pivotally secured to a bracket 33 (Fig. 1) fastened to the lathe bed 34. To the upper end of the lever there is attached a pull spring 35 which is anchored to any suitable support such as 35 (Fig. 3) so as to yieldingly hold the Wedge 3| in contact with the periphery of the portion Hi to follow the contour thereof so as to maintain the wedge 3| between the flange 20 and annulus 28. The wedge 3| is of a width slightly greater than the width of the portion l9 and the sides thereof engage the flange 20 and annulus 28 so as to tilt the annulus to cause the same, when the apparatus is in operation, to rotate at an angle to the axis of rotation of the arbor substantially that of the helix of the coil being formed thus crowding each turn of the coil as formed toward the coil severing means which is at a location spaced from the annulus 28 a distance of four turns of the coil; that is, a coil C of four turns of wire R is continuously formed on the portion 11 prior to severing of the end turn of said coil.

The end turn of the coil C is severed to form a rim piece by a cutter or knife 36, the cutting edge of which is in line with the apex of the V formation 2'! on the bar 26.. As the rim wire is severed, the now free end portions 31 thereof are engaged by spaced forming tool 38 to bend said free ends against the sides of the portion 21 to turn said free ends 31 in the manner shown in Figure 5. The forming tool 38 is in the form of a lever 39 having spaced side portions 45 joined by a bridge 41. The knife 36 is carried by a lever 42 which extends in the space between the side portions 40. Both of these levers 39 and 42 are pivotally supported by means of a common pivot pin 43 held in a bracket designated generally 44.

The bracket 44 comprises a body 45 of a width to extend beyond each side of the arbor and in spaced relation therewith and has a central leg portion 46 attached thereto by means of screws 41. The leg 46 is received in the recess 25 and extends therein in continuation of the bar 26. Said leg 46 may be secured in the recess 25 by frictional contact with the walls thereof and extends radially beyond the periphery of arbor portion H. The outward portion of the leg adjacent the bar 26 is tapered as at 48 (see Fig. 6) for a purpose which will hereinafter appear Spaced walls 49 having foot portions 49 are secured to the upper side of the body 45 as by means of screws 50 (Fig. 3). The pivot pin 43 is secured to these walls 49 and the levers 39 and 42 are positioned in the space between these walls to be guided thereby in their movement about said pin 43 to and from the coil C.

In order to friction the turns of the coil against the periphery of portion I! as being wound and to retain the severed pieces on the arbor to he slid therefrom, presser members 5| and 52 are provided. Presser member 5| consists of a plate which is secured to the bracket 44 by means of screws 53 and depends therefrom into engagement with the coil C. Presser member 52 comprises a support 54 having recesses therein facing the portion I1. In each recess there extends an elongated shoe 55 which is adjustable into engagement with the lower portion of the coil C and severed pieces by means of screws 56. Said presser member 52 is supported in position by means of straps 51, 58 secured thereto by screws 59, 6B and to the side of the bracket 44 by screws GI, 62.

The knife 35 and forming tool 38 are cam actuated and to this end the lever 42 carries a roller 63 which upon rotation of the arbor IE.

will engage a stationary cam 64 secured to the lathe bed and be swung thereby about its pivot 43 to move the knife 36 into engagement with the end turn of coil C to sever the same. The lever 42 also carries adjustable threaded members 65 which are positioned to engage the up-- per edge of the walls 49 to limit the inward movement of the lever and. an adjustable threaded member 66 positioned to engage the upper side of the body 45 so as to limit the outward movement of the said lever. The lever 42 is returned to the outward position by means of a compression spring 61.

The lever 39 similarly carries a roller 68 which in the rotation of the arbor will engage a cam 69 to swing the same inwardly to move the forming tool 38 carried at the end thereof, into engagement with the ends of said end turn as being severed in the manner previously described.

As each rim piece is severed and the ends bent as described the rim pieces will be slid along the arbor into engagement with the tapered end of the leg 46 (see Fig. 6) to be spread thereby to pass by the side of said leg, and off the arbor. When the rim pieces are'free of the arbor proper, thesame will move onto a collecting" member 10 which issuiiiciently inclined to the horizontal to permit'the rim pieces to slide along this member by gravity into juxtaposition thereon to be thereafter collected by suitable means.

The member III is made of tubular stock and is inserted over the reduced end I8 and is there secured by screws II (see Fig. 3). The other end of said member 10 is rotatably attached to a bracket 12 (Fig. 1) having a reduced cylindrical portion I3 received within the member 10 and about which said member is rotatable. The bracket 12 is made'in two parts hingedly related by means of a nut and bolt fastening I4, I5'and has a foot portion 16 which rests upon the lathe bed 34. The foot 16 has an elongated slot 11 through which extends a tie bolt 18 for securing the bracket to the lathe bed. When it becomes desirable to unload the collecting member 10, the bolt 18 is loosened and the bracket moved to clear the member 10. The nut I4 is also loosened whereby the upper portion of the bracket may be swung out of line with the member 10 and the rim pieces removed as by insertin a headed rod (not shown) within the said member I and manually sliding the rim pieces onto the rod as it is withdrawn from the said member.

The operation of the apparatus shown in Figures 1 to 5 has been given in connection with the description of the parts thereof and a brief gen eral review of the operation will suffice in order to clearly understand its mode of operation. Assuming the rim wire material W to have been manually coiled a sufficient number of turns on the portion l 'I and slid between the presser members to initially secure the wire to the portion I7, the live spindle of the lathe may now be set into motion to rotate the arbor l6 and such structure carried thereon. The rim material will be drawn through the guide 29 and helically coiled about the portion I'I adjacent the annulus 28. The rim material W led from a suitable source of supply (not shown) will be passed through the tensioning and guide device 29 and led from there to the arbor I6 and manually wound a few turns about the portion l! of the arbor. The free end turn will be held in place against the arbor by the shoes 55. Upon rotation of the arbor I6 the same will draw the wire W through the tensioning device 29 to wind said wire about the arbor. The wire W will engage against the adjacent side of the annulus 28 which will guide each turn of said wire W at the proper angle. As the coil is formed, each succeeding turn will advance the free end turn of the coil toward the knife 36 and forming tool 38. At each revolution of the arbor the rollers 63 will engage the cam 64 to rock the lever 42 carrying the knife 36 to move the same into engagement with the portion of the free end turn beneath the knife to sever said turn into a lens rim piece. Upon the severing of said end turn the roller 68 will engage the cam 69 to rock the forming tool 38 into engagement with the end portions of the now severed turn to move said portion into engagement with the relative stationary portion 25 to turn said end portions outwardly. Further ad- In Figures 8 and 9 there is shown an apparatus of a modified construction for forming lens rims to which the temple mountin is attached directly to the end extremities of the lens rim. In"

this apparatus an arbor has a central bore 8| which opens into the collecting tube 10, and an opening 82 extending from the side of the arbor to the opening 8|. The arbor carries an anvil 83 in the side thereof adjacent the opening 82 and has an opening 84 in register with said opening 92. The wire W is coiled about the arbor and anvil in the same manner as above described. The end turn of the coil C is severed by a cutter or knife 85 which is carried on a lever 86 pivotally secured to a bracket 81 carried by the arbor so as to rotate therewith. The lever carries a roller 88 which engages at each revolution of the arbor a cam 89 and is swung inwardly to sever said end turn of the coil to form a rim piece. The cutter in the present instance severs a small fragment of the wire in severing the end turn of the coil and this fragment 90 (see Fig. 9) drops through the openings 84, 82 and by gravity into the hollow of member ID to be thereinafter removed. The arbor 80 and collecting member To is also set at an angle as in the previously described apparatus. The lever 86 is moved to the inoperative position by a compression spring Ill and in order to assure the return movement of the lever 86, a roller 92 is provided at the opposite end of the lever which engages a cam 93 to swing the lever to the inoperative position after the lever has moved through its full cutting stroke.

In Figures 10, 11 and 12 I have shown an ap paratus wherein the severing means is in the form of a saw 94 which is attached to a shaft 95 journalled in bearing openin 96 in the body of the arbor 91 which may be rotated in any suitable manner. The shaft 95 is rotated through a worm wheel 98 attached to the shaft 95 and engaging with a worm 99- which is carried by a shaft I00 extending through the bore IIlI of the arbor and journalled in bearings I92, I93 and I94. The end of the shaft I 00 extends beyond the arbor and is provided with a pulley I65 for driving the same. As the coil C" of rim wire is formed on the arbor 91, the same will be. advanced in the same manner as previously described into the saw 94 to be severed in rim pieces R. In this apparatus as in the two previously described, the severed rim pieces are moved into engagement to be spread apart and past the tapered end I06 of the bracket designated generally ID! to which are suspended the supports for the presser shoe I08.

It will now be apparent that I have disclosed an apparatus wherein the coiling of lens rim wire and severing the said coil into rim pieces is accomplished in a continuous operation thereby eliminating the necessary separate handling and operation of the prior art.

I claim:

1. A lens rim forming machine comprising a continuously rotating arbor, said arbor having a support projecting radially therefrom, a knife rockably mounted on said support for movement to and from said arbor, an anvil projecting radially from said arbor opposite to said knife and in line therewith and having sides inclined with respect to the adjacent surface portion of said arbor, means for guiding and coiling rim wire material on said arbor and over said anvil whereby said portion of the coils extending over said anvil will be spaced from said sides and said adjacent surface portions, said means advancing said coils to beneath said knife, a presser member secured'to said support and projecting therefrom in engagement with the coils on the arbor for pressing said coils into frictional engagement with said arbor as said coils are advanced along the arbor, cam means positioned in the path of movement of said knife to be engaged thereby for rocking the same into severing engagement with said coils for severing the same into lens pieces, and a formingtool carried by said support and movably -mounted for movement towards the said-side of'said anvil to engage the severed end portions of said coil to move the same into engagement with the sides of said anvil and said adjacent surface portions of said arbor to turn said end portions outwardly.

2. .A lens rim forming machine as set forth in claim 1 in which said forming tool is rockably mounted on said support and provided with spaced arms extending on each side of said knife, and cam means positioned in the path of movement of said forming tool to be engaged thereby for movement thereof into engagement with said severed end portions of the lens pieces.

3. In a lens rim forming machine comprising a continuously rotating arbor, means for guiding and coiling rim wire material, said means including a first shoulder on said arbor, a second shoulder on said arbor, an annulus loosely received on said arbor and adapted to engage against said second shoulder, a resiliently mounted wedge of a size greater than the distance between said shoulders and adapted to be resiliently moved between said first shoulder and said annulus to slant said annulus with respect to the axis of said arbor whereby wire rim material advanced to said arbor against the free side of said annulus will be helically advanced along the arbor, and severing means carried by said arbor for severing said coils into lens pieces.

4. A lens rimforming machine comprising a continuously rotating arbor, said arbor having a support projecting radially therefrom, a knife rockably mounted on said support for movement to and from said arbor, an anvil projecting radially from said arbor opposite to said knife and in'line therewith and having sides inclined with respect to the adjacent surface portion of said arbor, means for guiding and coiling-rim wire material on said arbor and over said anvil whereby said portion of the coils extending over said anvil will be spaced from said sides and said adjacent surface portions, said means advancing said coils to beneath said knife, a first presser member secured to said support and projecting therefrom in engagement with the coils on the arbor, a second presser member diametrically opposed from said anvil and secured to said support, said presser members pressing said coils into frictional engagement with said arbor-as said coils are advanced along the arbor, and cam means positioned in the path of movement of said knife to be engaged thereby for rocking the same into severing engagement with said coils for severing the samev into lens pieces.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification140/71.00R, 140/88, 29/20
International ClassificationB21F45/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21F45/002
European ClassificationB21F45/00B