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Publication numberUS2688423 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1954
Filing dateJul 12, 1951
Priority dateJul 12, 1951
Publication numberUS 2688423 A, US 2688423A, US-A-2688423, US2688423 A, US2688423A
InventorsDavis Nelson L
Original AssigneeDavis Nelson L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plug valve and gas agitating means for storage sumps
US 2688423 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 7, 1954 i N. L. DAVIS 2,633,423

PLUG VALVE AND GAS AGITATING MEANS FOR STORAGE SUMPS Filed July 12, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet l 20 fly] i i 25 23 K v .9 2 3 9 7 fnveizzar' 4 I U M23071 1?. Davis Sept. 7, 1954 N. L. DAVI'S Filed July 12, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 'l 73 (/3 l: 2 I I: I! H Ii I l I: I I 7|: /3/

3 4 fnvenza JVeZson'L.Z7aUZ5 discharge pipe 4.

Patented Sept. 7, 1954 PLUG VAL\ E AND GAS AGITATING MEANS FOR STORAGE SUMPS Nelson L. Davis, Chicago, Ill.

Application July 12 1951, Serial No. 236,406

12 Claims.

My invention relates to improvements in plug valves for storage sumps wherein such heavy liquids as water with finely divided magnetite and the like may be stored.

. One object of my invention is to provide for association with a float and sink heavy medium processor and storage sump a plug valve which may be seated to cause the sump to retain the heavy medium and wherein the settling of the solids which increase the specific gravity of the medium may be prevented from interfering with the opening and closing of the plug valves.

Other objects will appear from time to time throughout the specification and claims.

My invention is illustrated more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a diagrammatic sectional view of a preferred form of the device;

Figure 2 is a similar sectional view of a modified form.

Like parts are indicated by like characters throughout the specification and drawings.

I is a sump tank. In this case it is the type of medium storage sump tank that would be used with a sink and float processor. It has a conical bottom 2, the walls of which are very sharply inclined so as to afford a minimum of support for settled solids. At the apex of the 'cone is an annular valve seat 3 which communicates with a 5 is a supply pipe through which fluid reaches the sump. 6 is a streamlined smooth surfaced, generally parabolic plug valve adapted to penetrate the throat of the pipe and seat on the seat 3. The lower portion of the valve extending above and below the seat is as indicated at l of rubber or rubber-like material which can engage and hug the valve seat 3. The upper portion of the plug 6 is as indicated at 8 of metal adapted to contain a plurality of air discharge apertures 9 spaced around the periphery thereof immediately above the seat 3 and in close relationship to the constricted lower portion of the wall 2. A conduit 10 in the body 8 is in communication with the apertures 9. H is a hollow valve stem carrying the plug valve 6 in register with the conduit l0 and extending upwardly above the level of the liquid in the sump tank.

I2 is a cylinder mounted on a supporting I framework I3 on the sump tank I. In this cylinthe rod II and the ducts In a clear and unobstructed passage from the interior of the cylinder l2 above the piston l4 down to the apertures 9 and through them to the interior of the tank. The cylinder I2 is closed at its lower end by a cylinder head l6 and box ll. It is closed at its upper end by a cylinder head It). The two cylinder heads having stop members H! as indicated to limit the movement of the piston and leave clearance at both ends between the heads and the piston.

29 is a two-way valve, a duct 2| leads from the lower end of the cylinder and duct 22 from the upper end of the cylinder to the valve 20. An air supply duct 23 leads from any suitable source 'of air supply to the valve 20. The valve 20 in-- cludes a member 24 having two control passages 25 and 26. In the position as indicated, air under pressure from the source of supply passes through the duct 23, passage 25, the duct 22 to the upper end of the cylinder. Assuming that the piston is in the down position as indicated, the air fills the cylinder and air under pressure is forced downwardly through the valve stem l l, the duct Ill and the ports 9 into the restricted area immediately surrounding the plug valve and between it and the sharply inclined walls of the conical bottom of the sump. This air pressure escaping through the ports 9 into this narrow space violently agitates the contents of that space. Assuming that the apparatus has been out of operation for a while, the contents of that space will include a small amount by Weight of water with a relatively large amount by weight of magnetite or other heavy material which is settled out of the medium in the tank and which would, unless agitated and removed, make it difiicult,if not impossible to raise the plug valve. When the operator has turned on this air pressure and caused the air to bubble up through this narrow restricted zone, agitating the water to a sufficient time, he then rotates the operating valve member 24 through an angle of ninety degrees. This causes air under pressure from the pipe 23 to pass through the duct 26, pipe 2| to the underside of the piston and raise the piston causing the valve stem to move upwardly to unseat the streamlined plug valve and permit the flow of medium downwardly through the conduit 4. If it should happen that when the operator makes this change in operating valve position the valve will remain seated, he would immediately know that he had not aerated the bottom of the tank long enough and he would return the parts to the position shown in the drawing but as soon as this heavy medium has been brought into suspension, it will be possible for the air pressure to raise the piston, and unseat the valve. Under these circumstances, of course, there is no occasion for air being bubbled into the bottom of the tank. Once the medium is sufiiciently fluid to release its hold on the plug valve, any further air supplied to the plug valve at the discharge throat would be wasted or entrained with the downward flow-of medium and might interfere with the pump action or the control and operation of the sink and float system. Thus the highly desirable function of preventing air bubbling during and after the plug valve is opened, is automatically achieved. Of course, as soon as the piston I4 has reached the upper end of its excursion, it stops'and the operator may leave the valve in the position it was as the plug valve went up to allow the air pressure to hold the piston up or he can rotate the valve to a neutral position and so lock the air pressure in the cylinder.

When it is desired to close the plug valve the operator returns the valve to the position shown in the drawing. Air under pressure then enters the upper part of the cylinder and moves the piston downwardly. Any bubbling of air through the ports 9 at this time will tend-to agitate further the fluid as the" valve approaches its seat and so minimize resistance to seating of the plug valve.

In the modified form shown in Figure 2, the plug valve 30 is substituted for the plug valve 6, the difference being that the plug valve as has no air chamber or air discharge apertures. The solid valve stem 3| is substituted for the hollow valve stem H. The pipe 32 communicates with the pipe 22 and leads to amanifold 33 adjacent the bottom of the vessel, there being ports 34 through the wall of the vessel from the manifold whereby when the plug valve 24-is manipulated, to admit pressure to the cylinder- I2 above the piston, air is simultaneously forced into the bottom of the tank immediately above the valve seat and immediately surrounding the valve so that the effect of the air in clearing the valve is the same, even though the air does not enter the vessel through the valve itself. Other'suitable means, of course, might be provided to control the air supplied to the bottom of the valve but the form indicated is preferable because it insures that the relationship between the bubbling of air into the vessel and the valve is the same in the case of the device of Figure-1 and Figure 2.

While it is preferable to have a conical vessel,

nevertheless, it will be obvious that a vessel with a curved bottom or shaped bottom may be used so long as the port 3 is at the bottom of the vessel.

The use and operation of my invention are as follows:

The medium sump disclosed in my co-pending application Serial No. 186,604 Apparatus and Method of Sink and Float Mineral Separation, filed September 5, 1950 shows diagrammatically the use of the medium sump and plug valve to k which my present invention is directed.

As long as the processor is in operation, a continuous stream of water with finely divided magnetic material such as magnetite pours into the storage sump and immediately runs out through the valve seat and pipe for recirculation. There is only a very small amount of liquid in the sump and it is moving rapidly therethrough at all times while the device is in operation, flowing around the streamlined plug valve. Hence the necessity "operator manipulates the air valve to cause the plug valve to move downwardly in the direction of the flow of the medium toward its seat. As

soon as seating has taken place, flow of medium stops, medium drains out of the processor and recirculation system and fills the medium storage sump. This medium being of very high specific gravity even though very finely divided very soon settles down in the bottom of the tank and buries the plug valve in a rigid mass of media so solid that no ordinary mechanism could possibly pull the plug valve up against it or through it to open the port. This of course is a very much heavier solid mass than is ordinarily found in any usual factory or industrial operation. Many times as heavy as the slimes or pulp which are likely to be found in water'in storage vessels.

When it is desired to start up the plant again, the medium must be first agitated for two reasons: First, so that the plug valve may be withdrawn to unseat the port; and second, so that slugs of undistributed media will not pass down into the recirculation pump and cause damage there. So the operator as his first step to putting the device back into operation admits air to the cylinder so that it. passes down through the piston and connecting rod to aerate, agitate and distribute the solidified'or settled mass of media in the bottom of the sump. Only when this mass ofmedia has been so agitated by the air rushing out through the narrow space between the valve and the conical walls of the sump as to permit withdrawal of the plug is it safe to allow' the medium to escape and travel down the pipe to the pump. Thus by 'my arrangement the operator is unable to cause the plug to move upwardly by air until adequate aeration of the contents'of the storage sump or tank has taken place and the fact that if he turns on the air between the piston prematurely he is still unable to lift the plug valve, provides an adequate safeguard against admitting too concentrated a mass of media to the pump.

Since the discharge from the vessel of settled material of too great a density can clog or perhaps disable the pump, it is of the utmost importance that the valve be not opened until the solids contained in the liquid in the vessel are so mixed with the liquid that they will pass throughthe pump and piping system without damage. This is insured by so relating the size of the piston with the available air pressure that the air pressure cannot cause upward piston movement until the solids in the vessel have been suflicientlya'gitated to insure that the liquid will pass through the pump. Some settlement of the solids, of course, would not be fatal. Perhaps the plant mightbe shut down. for an hour or so and still settlement of solidswould do no harm but once thesolids have been settled down around the valve to a point where they are sufiicientlycondensed and concentrated to be dangerous to the pump, the valve cannot be opened.

Thus the operatorcannotmake the two most serious possiblemistakesbecause as the valve closes, air isbubbling through thevalve to'agitate the liquid around the valve seat, the valve and valve seat are washed clear of any solids which if they settled between the valve and valve seat might cause leakage and until the'operator has put on the air long enough to sufllciently agitate the liquid, he cannot open the valve.

Iclaim:

1. In combination, a liquid tight vessel, a discharge port in the bottom thereof, a valve seat encircling the port, a valve located within the vessel above and movable toward and from the seat, a cylinder, a piston mounted for reciprocation therein and a driving connection between the piston and the valve whereby movement of the "piston may open and close the valve, a fluid connection between the interior of the valve and the cylinder above the piston, a fluid discharge port in the valve above the valve seat when the valve is seated and means for controlling motive fluid to the lower side of the piston to raise the valve and to the upper side to both seat the valve and force fluid upwardly through it and into and through the vessel and the material therein contained.

2. In combination, a liquid tight vessel having a conical bottom, a discharge port adjacent the apex of and concentric with the conical bottom, a valve seat encircling the port, a valve, located within the vessel aboveand movable toward and from the seat, a cylinder, a piston mounted for reciprocation therein and a driving connection between the piston and the valve whereby movement of the piston may open and close the valve, a fluid connection between the interior of the valve and the cylinder above the piston, a fluid discharge port in the valve above the valve seat, adjacent the apex of the cone, when the valve is seated and means for controlling flow of motive fluid to the lower side of the piston to raise the valve and to the upper side of the piston to .both seat the valve and force fluid through it upwardly into the vessel, above the valve seat and through the material therein contained.

3. In combination, a liquid tight vessel, a discharge port in the bottom thereof, a valve seat encircling the port, a valve.located within the vessel above and movable toward and from the seat, a cylinder, a piston mounted for reciprocation therein and a driving connection between the piston and the valve whereby movement of the piston may open and close the valve, a fluid connection between the cylinder above the piston and the vessel adjacent the valve seat, th connection including a conduit open at one end to the cylinder and at the other end terminating in a port open to the vessel immediately adjacent but above the valve seat and means for controlling flow of motive fluid to the lower side of the piston to raise the valve and to the upper side of the valve to both seat the valve and force motive fluid into the vessel above the seat.

4. In combination, a liquid tight vessel having a conical bottom, a discharge port adjacent the apex of and concentric with the conical bottom, a valve seat encircling the port, a valve located Within the vessel above and movable toward and from the seat, a cylinder, a pistonmounted for reciprocation therein and a driving connection between the piston and the valve whereby movement of the piston may open and close the valve, a fluid connection between the cylinder above the piston and the vessel adjacent the valve seat, the

connection including a conduit open at one end to the cylinder and at the other end terminating in a port open to the vessel immediately adjacent but above the valve seat and means for control- 6 ling flow of motive fluid to the lower side of the piston to raise the valve and to the upper side of the valve to both seat the valve and force motive fluid into the vessel above the seat.

5. In combination, a liquid tight vessel, a discharge port in the bottom thereof, a valve seat encircling the port, a valve located within the vessel above and movable toward and from the seat, a cylinder, a piston mounted for reciprocation therein and a driving connection between the piston and the valve whereby movement of the piston may open and close the valve, a fluid connection between the interior of the valve and the cylinder above the piston, a fluid discharge port in the valve above the valve seat when the valve is seated and means for controlling motive fluid to the lower side of the piston to raise the valve and to the upper side to both seat the valve and force fluid through it into the vessel above the seat, the cylinder being above the liquid in the vessel, the fluid connection between the valve and the cylinder comprising a conduit through the driving connection between the piston and the valve.

6. In combination, a liquid tight vessel having a conical bottom, a discharge port adjacent the apex of and concentric with the conical bottom.

a valve seat encircling the port, a valve located within the vessel above and movable toward and from the seat, a cylinder, a piston mounted for reciprocation therein and a driving connection between the piston and the valve whereby movement of the piston may open and close the valve, a fluid connection between the interior of the valve and the cylinder above the piston, a fluid discharge port in the valve above the valve seat adjacent the apex of the cone, when the valve is seated and means for controlling flow of motive fluid to the lower side of the piston to raise the valve and to the upper side of the piston to both seat the valve and force fluid through it into the vessel above the seat, the cylinder being above the liquid in the vessel, the fluid connection between the valve and the cylinder comprising a conduit through'the driving connection'between the piston and the valve.

7. In a medium storage sump for sink and float processors and the like includinga conical tank, the bottom wall of which is sharply inclined downwardly, a valve seat concentric with and located at the lower boundary of the downwardly conically inclined walls, a conduit extending downwardly away from the valve seat, an elliptical generally smooth surfaced plug valve contained within the tank adapted to be moved downwardly therein to seat upon the valve seat, a hollow valve stem extending upwardly from the plug valve to a point above the liquid level, the plug valve being ported adjacent but immediately above the valveseat, an air passage in the valve between the port and the hollow valve stem, a piston on the upper end of the valve stem, a cylinder in which the piston is free to reciprocate, a source of air under pressure, a control valve therefor, ducts leading from the control valve to the top and bottom of the cylinder, an air passage through the piston communicating with the hollow valve stem whereby when pressure is applied to the upper end of the cylinder, air is forced downwardly through the piston, hollow stem and plug valve to bubble upwardly through the restricted area between the plug valve and the bottom of the sump tank.

8. In a medium storage sump for sink and float processors and the like including a conical &6885423.

nk.;. he t n1 Wall i chi ta h ply nc-.- clined downwardly, a valve seat'concentricwithand located at the lower boundary ofthedown Wardly conically inclined-walls, a conduit extende ing,downwardly aWay fromthe valve seat, an elliptical'generally smooth surfaced plug valve contained within the tank adapted to bemoved downwardly therein to seat upon the-valve seat,

a hollow valve stem extending upwardly from;

when pressure is applied to the upper end of the cylinder, air is forced downwardly throughthe piston, hollow stem and plug valve to bubble up-,v wardly through the restricted area between-,the

plugvalve and the bottom of the sump tank, the

controlvalve being adapted in one position to permit air under pressure to enter the cylinder above the piston to seat the valve and simultaneously' force air to the bottom of the sump tank and in the other-position distribute air; beneath the piston to raise it and the valve to unseat the valve without admission of air to the sump tank. I

9. In combination, a liquid tight vessel, a discharge port in the bottom thereof, a valve seat encircling the port, a streamlined valve, circular in transverse cross section and ogival at both top and bottom in longitudinal cross section, having a compressible tip adapted to penetrate, extend partially through and seat upon the seat, a hollow stem extending upwardly through the vessel from the valve, air discharge ports in the body of the valve above the valve seat the hollow stem and the air discharge ports being in communication with one another through the valve, a cylinder, a piston mounted for reciprocation in the cylinder, the valve stem serving, as a piston rod for the piston and extending through the piston whereby when air pressure is applied to the upper face of the piston the piston is biased downwardly and air also passes downwardly through the valve stem for discharge into the encircling the port, a streamlined valve, circular; in; transverse cross section and ogivalat both;-

top and bottom in longitudinal cross section, having acompressible tip adapted to penetrate, ex-

tend partially through and seat upon the seat,

a hollow stem extending upwardly through-the vessel from the valve, air discharge ports in the body of the valve above the valve seat the hollow stem and the air discharge ports being in communication with one another through the valve, a cylinder, a piston mounted for reciprocation in the cylinder, the valve stem serving as a piston rod for the piston and extending through the piston whereby when air pressure is applied to the upper face of the piston the piston is biased downwardly and air also passes downwardly;

through the valve stem for discharge into the vessel through the valve, means including a manually adjustable valve for selectively controlling the flow of air to the upper and lower side of the piston, the piston and cylinder limiting the valve travel whereby when the valve is raised above encircling the port, a valve adapted to penetrate from above and seat upon the valve seat, a valve stem-extending upwardly therefrom, a cylinder,

a piston on the upper end of the valve stem, a

port in the bottom of the vessel above the seat,

means for supplying air simultaneously to the cylinder above the piston and to the port above the valve seat.

12. In combination, a liquid tight vessel, a discharge port in the bottom thereof, a valve seat encircling the port, a valve adapted to penetrate from above and seat upon the valve seat, a valve stem extending upwardly therefrom, a cylinder, apiston on the upper end of the valve stem, a port in the bottom of the vessel above the seat, means for supplying air simultaneously to the cylinder above the piston and to the port above the valve seat, said means being adapted to supply air only to the underside of the piston when airis shut off from the upper side of the piston and the port.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,254,472 Dahl Sept. 2, 1941 2,305,724 Luetzelschwab Dec. 22, 1942 2,315,058 Holt et a1 Mar. 30, 1943 2,569,085 Wood Sept. 25, 1951 2,578,994 Dunaway Dec. 18, 1951

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Referenced by
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US2900109 *Apr 29, 1957Aug 18, 1959Fibreboard Paper Products CorpMethod for preheating cementitious insulating material
US2979235 *Jan 9, 1958Apr 11, 1961Mckee & Co Arthur GHopper having means causing atmospheric inflow
US3005474 *Jul 21, 1958Oct 24, 1961Swanson Erie CorpDual tank lamp base filler
US3046937 *Dec 1, 1959Jul 31, 1962Fibreboard Paper Products CorpApplicator device for ejecting discrete droplets
US3053420 *Mar 8, 1960Sep 11, 1962Siderurgie Fse Inst RechStatic distributor for pulverulent material
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Classifications
U.S. Classification406/132, 406/137, 222/195, 222/148, 222/504, 137/246
International ClassificationF16K25/00, F16K25/02
Cooperative ClassificationF16K25/02
European ClassificationF16K25/02