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Publication numberUS2688579 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1954
Filing dateMay 21, 1951
Priority dateMay 23, 1950
Also published asDE898910C
Publication numberUS 2688579 A, US 2688579A, US-A-2688579, US2688579 A, US2688579A
InventorsMeyer Hans
Original AssigneeLacrinoid Products Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat-transfer and method of using same
US 2688579 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 7, 1954 H. MEYER Q 2,688,579

HEAT-TRANSFERS AND METHOD OF USING SAME Filed May 21, 1951 FIG.

acklky layer Back/k9 la er.

7\ To Plal'en fiealed lower Fla lm.

Lnmntbr HQns D469 Patented Sept. 7, 195 4 HEAT-TRANSFER AND METHOD OF' USING SAME Hans Meyer, Richmond, England, assignor to Lacrincid Products Limited, Essex, England, a

British company ApplicationMay21, 1951, Serial No. 227,517.

Claims priority, application Great Britain May 23, 1950 This invention relates to heat-transfers, i. e. transfer materials consisting of a temporary support carrying a transferable layer or design on its surface, such layeror-design being capable of transfer from the temporary support toa permanent support, e. g. fabric, by the application of heat and at least a slight pressure.

Various methods have been proposed for the production of heat-transfers, and generally it can be said'that the best results are obtained by employing transfer compositions containing a condensation product of a thermosetting resin which is capable of being converted into the insoluble and infusible state by the application of heat. Inthese methodsa temporary support, usually paper, carries on its surface the layer or design formed by the condensation product (which may contain pigments, colouring matters, and the like) and the design is: transferred by placing the transfer-face down on the textile material, applying water by convenient means to the back of the temporary support (such as by covering it with a moist cloth), and pressing the assembly firmly with an iron hot enough to transform part of thewater into-steam. In this way the transferable layer is caused-to separate from the temporary support and become secured to the textile fabric, but only the continued application of heat converts the condensation product' into the insoluble and infusible state and renders it fast to repeated laundering with soap and alkali at the temperature of boiling water, and to-dry-cleaning with white spirit, trichlorethylene, or other commonly employedsolvents.

Itwill be appreciated that, with these existing methods, either a rather prolonged time is required in the pressing operation in order to obtain satisfactory resistance to laundering or dry-cleaning (which renders the methods impracticable for mechanical application), or this resistance has tobe sacrificed to a large extent.

In some cases it is important that the transferred design should have a higher resistance to laundering or dry-cleaning, e. g. where the design is a name or trade-mark applied to linen, sheets and towels owned-by hotels and'shipping companies, and overalls employed by multiple stores. In order to obtain transferred designs of sufiiciently high resistance the time required in the pressing operation. is approximately 25 seconds per article, and a hand iron isusually employed in the process.

Where, on the other hand, heat-transfers-have tobe applied to hosiery and-other knitted-goods. the transfer operations, tobe economical; have 18: Claims. (Cl. 154- 95) to be carried, out in rapid succession using mechanical means, and the pressing time which can be allowed for each article is comparatively short. As aconsequence, these mechanically applied heat tra nsfers suffer from thedisadvantage that the designs producedin this way are not resistant to launderingv or dry-cleaning and they are, as a rule, wholly or partly removed from the articles during their first cleansing.

It, is an object; of! the present invention to overcome the'foregoing difficulties and to produce heat-transfers which are'capable of being applied at. an economical speed, which lends itself to a mechanisationofthe process,.and which yield transferred designs which are highly resistant to laundering and dry-cleaning.

The foregoing object is achieved according to the present invention byemploying, as the composition forming the basis of the transferable layer or design, a blendof 50 to 95% by weight solvent-soluble melamine-aldehyde resin and 5 to 50% by weight solvent-soluble alkyd resin,

both. being. thermosetting. resins in the solvent'- soluble state, convertible to an insoluble and infusible form by application-of heat and pres sure.

It: has been. found that melamine-aldehyde type resins are alone-not-entirely satisfactory as media for the: transfer material since they harden relatively: slowly on application of heat and pressure. Alkyd'resins, on the other hand, are also not entirely satisfactory when used alone since, though they harden rapidly on application of. heat andpressure, the transfersobtained bytheir use have not a sufiicient colourfastness. Byusingthe two resins together, however, ithas been found that the transfer material. hardens. rapidly under heat and pressure to. yield a; transferwhich is-highly resistant to laundering and dry-cleaning, as well' as to the mechanical stressesto which itis subjected in the course of such cleaningoperations, and which is of verygood colour-fastness.

In regard tothe melamine-aldehyde resin employed, it is to be observed that though such resins may beobtained-using various aldehydes, the preferred resins-according to the present invention arethose obtained by condensing melamines with formaldehyde. Resins from substituted melamines, e. g. alkylatecl melamine formaldehyde resins; may also be usefully employed.

The-alkyd type resinmay be any resin formed by the condensation of polyhydric alcohol with a polybasic acid, and; in particular, the glyceryl 3 phthalate resins sold under the registered trademark Glyptal and the oil-modified alkyd resins, are suitable.

The composition may contain pigments, dyestuffs or other materials adapted to create the required visual impression in the transferred layer or design. In formulating the composition the resins are preferably dissolved in appropriate solvents and the solutions obtained then mixed together. For example, the melamine-aldehyde resin may be dissolved in butyl alcohol and the alkyd resins dissolved in xylol. The pigments or dyestuffs or other materials which are to be added may be included in either solution or in the mixed solution. The concentration of the ingredients is adjusted to achieve a consistency in the composition, such that it may readily be applied by any of the well-known reproduction methods such as silk-screening, printing, roller coating, and the like, to a temporary support such as paper. On evaporation of the solvents the composition sets on the paper in the required design.

It is also possible to include in the composition a catalyst which will serve to accelerate the rate at which the composition hardens under heat and pressure, but this is undesirable if the compositions are to be kept for any substantial length of time before actually being used in a transfer operation since the accelerator tends in many cases to cause a slow hardening of the composition to take place on keeping even without the application of heat and pressure. If this happens the transferable layer may become diflicult or impossible to transfer.

According to the preferred form of the present invention, therefore, an accelerator for the hardening of the composition is applied to the transfer material immediately before or during the actual transfer operation. Generally speaking salts of strong acids with weak bases and also organic acids and esters thereof serve to act as accelerators and it is convenient, therefore, to apply these salts or acids in the form of dilute solutions or dispersions to the transfer material or the fabric immediately preceding the transfer operation. The accelerator is thus only brought into play when it is actually required to accelerate the hardening of the composition and in this way a very rapid hardening may be achieved without the danger of a slow hardening in the transfer material itself during its shelf life. The accelerators include ammonium sulphate, sodium bisulphate, zinc sulphate, aluminium sulphate, ammonium chloride, formic acid, acetic acid, oxalic acid, benzoic acid, ethyl hydrogen-phosphate, dioctyl succinate, trimethylamine hydrochloride.

Whereas with existing methods it is usual to place the fabric on a supporting table, place the transfer on the fabric with the transferable layer in contact with the fabric, lay over the transfer material a piece of cloth soaked in water, and apply heat and pressure, e. g. by means of a hot iron, to the surface of the moist cloth, an alteration of this order is preferred in the present invention in order to bring the accelerator into play. This alteration consists of applying heat through the medium of a pad moistened with accelerator solution to the reverse side of the fabric and placing the transfer so that its transferable layer is directed towards the source of course, be held together under some pressure during the transfer operation.

The preferred method is illustrated more particularly in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 illustrates, in section, a backing layer to which a transferable layer has been applied;

Figure 2 is a side elevation showing simple equipment for applying the transferable layer to the permanent support.

Two forms of apparatus for applying the transfers are shown by way of example on Figures 1 and 2 of the drawings, in which the permanent support to which the transfer is to be applied is shown at 3. The transfer comprises a backing 4 and a transferable layer 5. A pad of absorbent material is shown at 6, this pad being moistened with the accelerator solution, and it will be observed that it is placed on the opposite side of the permanent support to the transfer. The application of the transfer is efiected by upper and lower platens l, 8 respectively and it will be noted that preferably the platen 8 is heated while the platen I may not be heated or it may be heated to a lower temperature than the platen 8. After the application of heat and pressure by the platens l and 8 in the manner above described for a short period of dwell the platens are separated and the backing layer 4 removed. The support 3, with the transfer layer 5 firmly fixed thereto and converted into the insoluble and infusible state, can be removed from the apparatus.

The arrangements just described have been found to yield appreciably better results and though the reason for the improvement resulting from this technique remains uncertain, and the applicant is not to be regarded as being restricted to any theory in this matter, it is believed that the improvement is due either to the fact that the heat reaches the transferable layer together with the accelerator or alternatively (or in addition) because the transfer is in a direction towards the source of heat and pressure rather than away from it. Thus the side of the transferable layer which is. to become intimately associated with the textile fabric is the side which is reached first by the applied heat and this may cause it to melt temporarily and adhere very firmly to the fabric.

By reason of the improvements which may be effected in accordance with the present invention, it becomes possible to apply heat-transfers, manufactured in accordance with this invention, by a, rapidly operating transfer machine. The actual time required for a satisfactory transfer will vary with the particular blend of resins employed and with the particular accelerator used, but it has been found that transfer may be effected by single stage heat pressing operations lasting only to 5 seconds each.

The duration of the heat pressing treatment will vary with the temperature employed. Generally a temperature of at least C. is employed and whereas, using that temperature, a pressing time of 8 seconds is satisfactory, this may be reduced to 2 seconds by increasing the temperature to C., other factors remaining the same. The pressure required varies with the thickness and type of material to which the design is transferred. A pressure of 4 to 5 lbs. per square inch is suitable for a smooth thin material. and a thicker rougher material, such as woollen fabric, may require 15 to 20 lbs. per square inch pressure.

One of the advantages to be derived from the present invention is that designs can be produced on a variety of textile fabrics having the appearance of garment labels. These labels, which are used in the making-up of coats, suits, ladies blouses, shirts, neckties, underwear and the like, usually consist of a cotton, silk or artificial silk fabric with a woven or printed design and they are attached to the garments by sewing. This sewing-on does not usually form a special operation but is carried out during some stage in the making-up of the garments. It follows that, if the conventional garment label is to be replaced by a heat-transfer design, the latter must be capable of being transferred quickly and to withstand all laundering and dry-cleaning operations to which the garments are normally subjected,

Th following examples will serve to illustrate the invention:

Example I 48 parts by weight of by weight solution of butylated melamine-formaldehyde resin in butanol are mixed with 16 parts by weight of a 60% by weight solution of a non-drying castoroil-modified alkyd condensation product (acid value 10 to in xylol. To the mixture are added 3 parts by weight of the aniline pigment known as Irgalite PER, and the whole thoroughly dispersed on a triple roll mill. The resulting printing ink is applied by any of the usual printing techniques onto paper, and the paper dried at a moderate temperature. The transfer paper, thus prepared, is placed on a support with the design facing upwards, and white cotton fabric is placed on top. A pad moistened with a 10% solution of ammonium sulphate in water is placed on the fabric. On subjecting the assembly to a temperature of 150 C. and a pressure of 15 lbs. per square inch for 5 seconds, the design is transferred from the paper on to the fabric and very little of the printing ink remains on the paper base. On boiling the fabric carrying the transferred design for 30 minutes in an aqueous solution containing 1% by weight of soap and 0.5% by weight of sodium carbonate, the brilliance of the colour is unaffected, there is no bleeding of the colour into the parts of the fabric surrounding the transfer, and the wash water is unstained. The boiling can be repeated a number of times without showing any effect on the transfer.

Example II A mixture is prepared from 16 parts by Weight of a 60% by weight solution of butylated melamine-formaldehyde resin in butanol and 1 part by weight of a 60% by weight solution of a nondrying castor-oil-modified alkyd in xylol. To half of this mixture is added 5% by weight of the aniline pigment known as Monastral Fast Blue L, B. S. and to the reset 6.5% by weight of titanium dioxide, and both inks are thoroughly ground. The blue printing ink is printed onto paper to form a design and dried. The white printing ink is then applied over the whole surface of the paper bearing the blue design, e. g. by roller coating, and dried. The paper carrying the printed transfer is cut to the size of a garment label and placed on a support with the design facing upwards. A striped fabric consisting of a blend of viscose and cellulose acetate yarns is placed over the design and an absorbent fabric or paper moistened with a 5% by weight mixture of mono-octyl succinate and 95% by weight methylated spirit is placed on top. The assembled layers are then subjected to a temperature of 150 0. applied to the ab-. sorbent fabric or paper and to a pressure of 15 lbs.- persquare inchfor 5. seconds in orderto transfer the. design from the paper support to the fabric. The appearance of a garment label is created by the fact that the white print forms a background by obliterating the striped pattern ofthe. fabric, with the blue printing appearing on the faceof it. The fastness and brilliance of the colours of the transferred layer and design are not afiected in any. way by repeated dry-cleanin with trichlorethylene.

Est-ample III A mixture is prepared of 10 parts of a 60% by weight solution of a butylated melamine-formaldehyde resin in butanol, 10 parts of 60% by weight solution of a non-drying castor-oil-modified alkyd resin in xylol, 11.5 parts by weight of benzyl alcohol (serving as high boiling solvent to maintain fluidity) and 18.5 parts by weight of titanium dioxide. The whole is thoroughly ground and the resulting mixture printed on to paper and dried. The transfer so produced is placed on a support with the design facing upwards and covered with a piece of woolen fabric. Over this is placed an absorbent fabric or paper moistened with a 10% aqueous solution of formic acid, and the whole assembly subjected to a pressure of 15 lbs. per square inch and a temperature of C., applied to the absorbent fabric or papenfor 5 seconds. The design is thereby transferred from the paper to the fabric and is un" affected by repeated washing or dry-cleaning.

I claim:

1. A heat transfer material comprising a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer being capable of transfer from the temporary support to a permanent support by the application of heat and at least a sl ht pressure, the said transferable layer consisting essentially of a blend of 50-95% by weight melamine-aldehyde resin and 50 by weight alkyd resin both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble state convertible to aninsoluble and infusible form by the said application of heat and pressure.

2. A heat transfer material comprising a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer being capable of transfer from the temporary support to a permanent sup: port by the application of heat and at least a slight pressure, the said transferable layer consisting essentially of a blend of 50-95% by weight melamine-formaldehyde resin and 5G-5% by weight alkyd resin both. said resins being there mosetting resins in the solvent-soluble state convertible to aninsoluble and infusible form by the said application of heat and pressure.

3. A heat transfer material comprising a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer being capable of transfer from the temporary support to a permanent support by the application of heat and at least a slight pressure, the said transferable layer consisting essentially of a blend of 50-95% by weight melamine-aldehyde resin and 50-5% by weight oil-modified alkyd resin both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble state convertible to an insoluble and infusible form by the said application of heat and pressure.

4. A heat transfer material comprising a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer being capable of transfer from thetemporary support to a permanent support by the application of heat and at least a slightpressure, the said, transferablelayer consisting essentially of a blend of 50-95% by weight melamine-formaldehyde resin and 50-5% by weight oil-modified alkyd resin both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble state convertible to an insoluble and infusible form by the said application of heat and pressure.

5. A heat transfer material comprising a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer being capable of transfer from the temporary support to a permanent support by the application of heat and at least a slight pressure, the said transferable layer consisting essentially of a blend of 50-95% by weight butylated melamine-formaldehyde resin and 5 by weight castor-oil-modified alkyd resin both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble state convertible to an insoluble and infusible form by the said application of heat and pressure.

6. A heat transfer material comprising a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer being capable of transfer from the temporary support to a permanent support by the application of heat and at least a slight pressure, the said transferable layer consisting essentially of a blend of -95% by weight melamine-aldehyde resin and 50-5% by Weight alkyd resin, the said layer further containing colouring material both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble state convertible to an insoluble and infusible form by the said application of heat and pressure.

7. A heat transfer material comprising a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer being capable of transfer from the temporary support to a permanent support by the application of heat and at least a slight pressure, the said transferable layer consisting essentially of a blend of 50-95% by weight melamine-formaldehyde resin and 50-5% by weight oil-modified alkyd resin, the said layer further containing colouring material both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solventsoluble state convertible to an insoluble and infusible form by the said application of heat and pressure.

8. A heat transfer material comprising a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer being capable of transfer from the temporary support to a permanent sup- 0 port by the application of heat and at least a slight pressure, the said transferable layer consisting essentially of a blend of 509 by weight butylated melamine-formaldehyde resin and 50- 5% by weight castor-oil-modified alkyd resin, the said layer further containing colouring material both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble state convertible to an insoluble and infusible form by the said application of heat and pressure.

9. A heat transfer material comprising a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer being capable of transfer from the temporary support to a permanent support by the application of heat and at least a slight pressure, the said transferable layer consisting essentially of a blend of 50-95% by weight melamine-aldehyde resin and 50-5% by weight alkyd resin, the said layer further containing colouring material and being discontinuous and in the form of a design both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble state convertible to an insoluble and infusible form by the said application of heat and pressure.

10. A heat transfer material comprising a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer being capable of transfer from the temporary support to a permanent support by the application of heat and at least a slight pressure, the said transferable layer consisting essentially of a blend of 50-95% by weight butylated melamine-formaldehyde resin and 50- 5% by weight castor-oil-modified alkyd resin, the said layer further containing colouring material and being discontinuous and in the form of a design both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble state convertible to an insoluble and infusible form by the said application of heat and pressure.

11. A method of applying a heat transfer consisting of a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer consisting essentially of a blendof 50-95% by weight melamine-aldehyde resin and 50-5% by weight alkyd resin, both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble form, which comprises bringing the said layer into contact with a permanent support, applying heat and at least slight pressure thereto to effect the transfer of the said layer to said permanent support and the conversion of the transferred layer into an insoluble and infusible form on the permanent support.

12. A method of applying a heat transfer according to claim 11 including the step of simultaneously applying an accelerator for assisting the hardening of the said blend of resins.

13. A method of applying a heat transfer consisting of a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer consisting essentially of'a blend of 50-95% by eight melamine-aldehyde resin and 505% by weight alkyd resin, both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble form, which comprises assembling the said heat transfer with a permanent support such that the said layer is in contact with one side of thesaid permanent support, applying to the assembly an absorbent pad containing a solution of an accelerator for the hardening of the said resins, and applying heat and at least slight pressure to the assembly to effect the transfer of the said layer to the permanent support and the simultaneous hardening of the said layer by conversion of said resins into an insoluble and infusible state.

14. A method of applying a heat transfer consisting of a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer consisting essentially of a blend of 50-95% by weight melamine-aldehyde resin and 50-5% by Weight alkyd resin, both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble form, which comprises assembling the said heat transfer with a permanent support such that the said layer is in contact with one side of the said permanent support, applying to the other side of said permanent support an absorbent pad containing a solution of an accelerator for the hardening of the said resins, and applying heat and at least slight pressure to the assembly to effect the transfer of the said layer to the permanent support and the simultaneous hardening of the said layer by conversion of said resins into an insoluble and infusible state.

15. A method of applying a heat transfer consisting of a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer consisting essentially of a blend of 50-95% by weight melamine-aldehyde resin and 50-5% by weight alkyd resin, both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble form, which comprises bringing the said layer into contact with a perma- "sex 9 nent support, heating the assembly to 120-160" C. under slight pressure to effect the transfer of the said layer to said permanent support and simultaneously applying thereto an accelerator for the hardening of the said resins by conversion of said resins into an insoluble and infusible state.

16. A method of applying a heat transfer consisting of a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer consisting essentially of a blend of 50-95% by Weight melamine-aldehyde resin and 50-5% by weight alkyd resin, both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble form, which comprises bringing the said layer into contact with a permanent support, heating the assembly to 120-160 C. under a pressure of 4-20 lbs. per square inch to efiect the transfer of the said layer to said permanent support and simultaneously applying thereto an accelerator for the hardening of the said resins by conversion of said resins into an insoluble and infusible state.

1'7. A method of applying a heat transfer consisting of a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer consisting essentially of a blend of 50-95% by weight melamine-aldehyde resin and 50-5% by weight alkyd resin, both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble form, which comprises assembling the said heat transfer with a permanent support such that the said layer is in contact with one side of the said permanent support, applying to the assembly an absorbent pad containing a solution of an accelerator for the hardening of the said resins, and heating the assembly to 120- 160 C. under a pressure of 4-20 lbs. per square inch to effect the transfer of the said layer to the permanent support and the simultaneous hardening of the said layer by conversion of said resins into an insoluble and infusible state.

18. A method of applying a heat transfer consisting of a temporary support carrying a transferable layer on its surface, such layer consisting essentially of a blend of -95% by weight melamine-aldehyde resin and 05% by weight alkyd resin, both said resins being thermosetting resins in the solvent-soluble form, which comprises assembling the said heat transfer with a permanent support such that the said layer is in contact with one side of the said permanent support, applying to the other side of said permanent support an absorbent pad containing a solution of an accelerator for the hardening of the said resins, and heating the assembly to -160 C. under a pressure of 4-20 lbs. per square inch to eifect the transfer of the said layer to the permanent support and the simultaneous hardening of the said layer by conversion of said resins into an insoluble and infusible state.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,713,151 Terlinden May 14, 1929 2,516,487 Schlicksupp July 25, 1950 2, Francis June 5, 1951 2,593,553 Francis Apr. 22, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1713151 *Aug 3, 1927May 14, 1929American Tarso CompanyMethod of producing transfer work
US2516487 *Feb 20, 1947Jul 25, 1950Schlicksupp Theodore FMethod and apparatus for labeling fabrics
US2556078 *May 18, 1945Jun 5, 1951American Viscose CorpTransfer and method of coating therewith
US2593553 *May 31, 1946Apr 22, 1952American Viscose CorpApparatus for producing coated fabrics
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2839442 *Feb 23, 1955Jun 17, 1958Smith Corp A OProcess of making a lightweight structural panel
US2990311 *Jan 9, 1956Jun 27, 1961Dennison Mfg CoHeat transfer
US3001274 *Jan 18, 1957Sep 26, 1961Solar Aircraft CoBrazing article and method
US3043732 *Jan 2, 1957Jul 10, 1962Dennison Mfg CoTop label surprinting
US3401070 *May 19, 1965Sep 10, 1968Monsanto CoResin coating
US3620881 *Feb 17, 1969Nov 16, 1971Kannegiesser MaschinenApparatus for printing both sides of single or multiple layer textile articles
US3650740 *May 31, 1968Mar 21, 1972Agfa Gevaert NvTransfer of sheet-like material
US3907974 *Nov 8, 1973Sep 23, 1975Dennison Mfg CoCurable decorating systems for glass or metal containers
US4587155 *Mar 15, 1985May 6, 1986Raymond IannettaMethod of applying a dye image to a plastic member and the image bearing member thereby formed
US5073218 *Mar 27, 1990Dec 17, 1991Calco Cloth S.R.L.Method of transferring a toner image to a substrate
US5129978 *Jul 11, 1990Jul 14, 1992Solar-Kist CorporationDrying fabric, heat pressing
US6254970Oct 8, 1998Jul 3, 2001International Playing Card & Label Co.Ink and adhesive lacquer of heat activated polyester formed on transfer release agent; packages
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/230, 156/323, 428/914, 525/443, 428/530
International ClassificationB44C1/175
Cooperative ClassificationY10S428/914, B44C1/1756
European ClassificationB44C1/175F