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Publication numberUS2688671 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1954
Filing dateJun 17, 1948
Priority dateJun 17, 1948
Also published asDE847955C
Publication numberUS 2688671 A, US 2688671A, US-A-2688671, US2688671 A, US2688671A
InventorsLouis E Segesman
Original AssigneeHoover Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pedal operated switch structure for ambulatory floor treating tools
US 2688671 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 7, 1954 L. E. SEGESMAN PEDAL OPERATED SWITCH STRUCTURE FOR AMBULATORY FLOOR TREATING TOOLS Filed June 1'7, 1948 ATTORNEY.

Patented Sept. 7, 1954 PEDAL `OPERATED SWITCH STRUCTURE -FOR AMBULATO TOOLS RY FLOOR TREATING Louis E. lSegesman, Canton, Ohio, assigner to The Hoover Company, North Canton, Ohio, a fcorporation of Ohio Application June 17, 1948, Serial'No. 33,619

- trolling switch for the suction lcleaner Vvmotor is preferably mounted upon the rear of the motor y 'housing vwithin easy reach of the foot of the operator 'as lthe cleaner is moved `in and out fof storage position or propelled inthe -normal cleaning operation by a propelling handle.

In certain types of electric suction cleaners, itis preferable, `for convenient operation thereof, to have a foot-actuated motor-'controlling switch Aon or contiguous lto the motor 'housing of the cleaner, particularly to reduce the vcost of the cleaner `construction -over 'the type in which the electric -cord and switch `is vvmounted within the handle construction vof the cleaner. However, with prior foot-operated switch constructions, diiiiculty lhas been experienced and vdamage Idone "to the switch mechanism because of `forces Vof relatively lgreat magnitude 4applied Vto the `switchactuating member, for example 'in kicking the switch to yactua-te it, which Aare directly transmitted to the delicate parts of the *switch mechanism I'frequently lnecessitating 'the entire replacement thereof. l

It is therefore a principal 'object lof 'the present invention vto vprovide a foot-actuating mechanism for 'a push-type electric switch in which the forces applied tothe-actuating mechanism for operating vthe sw-itch are 'not transmitted to the parts of the 'switch Amechanism in such a manner as to cause vundue strain or damage to the switch mechanism.

Itis a Yfurther object `of 'the invention to 'provide an electric switch and actuating mech- :anism in which the switch mechanism ydoes not have any work to perform except the making landfbreakingof contact 'to openvor close an electric circuit; Vand in which the parts of the pushtype switch mechanism, even though 'they may ybe provided with stop means for Vlimiting the motion of the movable contact elements, ydo not operate as stop means vfor 4limiting the motion of the switch pedal.

The preferred motion for operating a 'foot loperated switch, particularly -fon the 'rear end y of a ysuction cleaner, 'is one which is a forward 'and Ydownward motion vof the yoperators foot.

'-It is therefore an object -of "the invention to provide an .electric switch land actuating mechanism in which the actuating `mechanismmay be (Cl. 20G- 6158) voperated by a forward and downward movement of the operators 'foot by providing a longitudinally movable switch pedal for actuating the conventional push-type switch.

Furthermore, it is another'object of the invention to `provide an electric switch and actuating ymechanism in which normal wear yof the parts or accumulation of dirt will not cause the parts to jam or prevent their operation.

1t is an additional object of the present invention to provide an -e'lectric switch and actuating mechanism in which the parts of the switch assembly a-lso retain Ycertain Yeasily lost pa-rts of the rear wheel mount against `displacement during adjustment and assembly vof the rear wheel mount.

-Still another object of the invention is to provide an electric switch and actuating mechanism in which some'or all of the desirableoharacteristics are incorporated and which is relatively cheap to fabricate and adapted to utilize standard types of `push-type switch mechanisms that are available commercially and which provides Yfor the ready Adetachment and replacement of this type of switch as they become worn out.

These and other Amore specific objects ywill appear yupon reading the following speciiication and claims and upon considering in `connection therewith the drawings to which they relate.

Refer-ring now tothe drawings in which a preferred embodiment of 'fthe present invention is disclosed, and in which the same reference characters referto the `same parts throughout:

Figure 1 is a 'fragmentary side elevation of a y suction-cleaner equipped 'with the improved pushtype switch and actuating mechanism;

Figure 2 is an enlarged longitudinal section through the switch and ractuating mechanism il- `lustrating the rear wheel 'mounting and its relation to the switch mechanism;

Figure 3 is a perspective view'with part of the motor lcasing broken away with the switch pedal removed Villustrating the construction of the switch pedal `mounting bracket; and,

Figure 4 is a perspective view with part yof the motor casing 'broken away at `the rear vend illustrating the switch pedal.

A novel low cost-apartment type suction cleaner lighter in `weight and having a narrower width 'nozzle construction than the Jconventional type of suction'cleaneris-fshown -in'Figure 'l which may comprise v'a motor, a motor housing IU provided with a main xcasting H forming a lfan housing ha-ving a fan :therein driven by the 4motor operatively connected through the fan eye of the "fan housing to a suction nozzle construction provided with an agitator construction I2 having the usual brush and beater construction as is well understood in the art. An operating handle is connected by a bail arm I3 to the motor housing I at a pivot connection I4 and a dust bag I5 is connected by a bag ring I6 having a suitably detachable bayonet connection complementally formed to the exhaust outlet I1 of the fan housing. The motor housing I0 and main casting I I are all mounted on front carrier wheels I8 and rear caster wheels I9, the rear caster wheels being vertically adjustable by the adjusting means 20, to be described in detail later.

The electric current for operating the motor is supplied thereto by means of a conductor 2l which is preferably supported from the bail arm I3 by a clamp v22, as shown in Figure 1, as it enters the motor housing I0 and is detachably suspended from the handle and leads to any source of power. The appliance cord 2i, after it enters the motor housing I0, has a lead 23 thereof operably connected to a conventional push-type .switch 24 having a lead 25 connected in series to a terminal of the motor, the other terminal of the motor being connected to the other lead of the appliance cord 2I completing the electrical circuit of the motor.

The electric switch unit 24 is of any usual construction that is on sale commercially of the socalled push-type switch in which a reciprocal plunger 26, Figures 2 and 3, actuates a suitable mechanism for making and breaking contact to complete or interrupt an electric circuit.

The electrical switch 24 is provided with a suitably threaded stem upon which is threadably mounted a hex-nut 21 for adjustably mounting the switch relative with respect to the motor housing I0. The switch stem extends through a hole 28 in the motor housing and through a complementally formed hole 29 in a switch pedal mounting bracket 30. The threaded stem of the switch and the complementally formed hole 29 are formed to prevent rotation of the switch with respect to the switch pedal mounting bracket as the switch is secured to the motor housing by the nut 21. Thus the nut 21 secures the switch and the bracket on the casing, and the bracket distributes the securing pressure of the nut over a large area of the outer surface of the casing. The bracket 30 is shaped as illustrated in Figure 2 having a locking slot 3I adapted to be engaged by a complementally formed latch 32 of a resiliently formed switch pedal retainer 33. The lower end of the bracket 30 is provided with forwardly and downwardly extending lugs 34 adapted to engage complementally formed recesses 35 formed as illustrated in Figures 2 and 3. The upper end of the bracket 30 is formed with an arcuate portion 33 adapted to engage an inner surface 31 of the switch pedal 38 as the switch pedal is moved forwardly and downwardly to actuate the switch 24. The upper end of the switch pedal retainer 33 is formed at 39 to engage the reciprocal plunger 25 of the switch. This end of the spring prevents rattling by tension against the switch button 26 and in addition provides metal to metal surface for sliding action upon depressing the switch pedal 38 to actuate the switch mechanism. The switch pedal retainer 33 is anxed by a self-tapping screw 45 to an integral boss 4I on the switch pedal.

The switch pedal 33 is preferably formed from a plastic material having high impact strength and may be of different color from the plastic material forming the motor casing I0 for the purpose of ornamentation and to accentuate the location of the switch to call the attention of the operator thereto. The switch pedal is formed as illustrated in Figure 2 with downwardly extending surfaces forming a closure for the switch Eiland switch pedal mounting bracket 30 and is complementally formed with respect to a recess 42 in which the aforementioned parts are mounted and in which the switch pedal is free to move in order to actuate the switch. The upper end of the switch pedal is formed with a tread portion 43. The boss 4I to which the switch pedal retainer is afxed is formed intermediate the length of the switch pedal; and, at the lower end of the switch pedal, a depending boss 44 is formed about which the switch pedal pivots upon the switch pedal mounting bracket as the switch pedal is actuated under a forward and downward movement thereof in order to actuate the reciprocal plunger 26 of the switch.

The novel rear caster wheel construction in which the switch pedal assembly serves to back up an insert nut 45 in the motor casing for a rear y wheel attachment screw 45 will now be described in detail.V The insert nut 45 is shaped as illustrated in Figure 2 and is prevented from turning by a recess 41 extending downwardly from the lower end of the recess 42 in which the switch pedal is mounted. The insert nut 45 vis formed with a portion which is adapted to engage the vrecess 41 and with a cylindrical portion 4B engaging the hole 49 molded in the motor housing I0. The hole 49 extends downwardly to a transverse recess 5|! in which is adjustably mounted a caster wheel shaft 5I. The rear caster wheels I9 are detachably mounted upon the caster wheel shaft 5I by spring-lock rings 52. Suitable nozzle adjustment shim plates 53 and 54 of suitable thicknesses are used to adjust the suction cleaning nozzle 55 to the correct nozzle height adjustment above the surface undergoing cleanling to obtain maximum cleaning eiciency. The rear wheel attachment screw 46 affixes the caster wheel shaft in adjusted position as it is assembled in threaded engagement with the insert nut 45, the nut 45 being prevented from turning as the attachment screw is assembled by the recess 41. The rear wheel attachment screw is locked in 4assembled position by a lock washer 56.

1n assembling the foot switch assembly and the rear caster wheel assembly, the insert nut 45 is positioned in the recess 41 and the hole 49. The switch 24 is then assembled upon the motor casing I0 by inserting it through the hole v28 and bracket 30 after which these parts are secured to the casing by the nut 21. The cylindrical portion 48 of the nut 45 is longer than the distance between the top of the nut 45 and the bracket 3B, see Fig. 2, wherefore the bracket prevents removal of this nut prior to assembly of the wheel shaft or during adjustment thereof. As also shown in Fig. 2, the latch 32 directly overlies the nut 45 when the pedal is assembled to the cleaner thus providing a means insuring that the nut 45 will be engaged in recess 41 during field adjustment of the wheel shaft.

The switch pedal 38 and the retainer 33 are assembled as a separate operation by affixing them together with the self-tapping screw 40. The rear caster wheel assembly comprising the wheels I9 and the rear caster wheel shaft 5I may then be assembled, a suicient number of nozzle adjustment shim plates being used to adjust the height of the nozzle above the surface acsacvi undergoing cleaning so that the suction cleaner is adjusted for maximum cleaning efficiency. The assembled switch pedal 38 and retainer 33 is then placed in the dotted position 51, Figure 2, with the forwardly extending iiange 58 in the continuation 59 of the recess 42. The Vswitch pedal 38 is moved Vdownwardly at the rear end until the lug 44 engages the mounting bracket 36. The latch 32 is preferably so shaped that, as the pedal is moved downwardly into position Iagainst the switch mounting bracket, it automatically enters its complementally formed locking slot 3| latching the switch pedal in position. It may be necessary, however, in the assembly operation to use a screw driver or other device to start the latch 32 within the locking lslot 3l. iin the assembled position, the switch pedal assembly and associated parts kare located as in `Figure 2. By stepping upon the tread 43 of the `switch pedal 38, the switch is actuated by the resilient end 39 of the switch pedal retainer which engages the reciprocal plunger 26 biasing .the lswitch pedal housing 38 upwardly a sufficient amount to prevent rattling thereof and in addition provides metal to metal surfaces for sliding action during the actuation of the switch mechanism.

In order to repair or adjust the switch 24, the switch pedal housing 3B may be removed by inserting a screw driver 50, as indicated in the dotted lines of Figure 2, against the latch 32 through the recess 4l, pushing inwardly an amount sufficient to release the latch lfrom the slot 3| and at the same ltime moving the switch pedal housing to the dotted position 51, after which it may be released by withdrawing the flange 58 from the recess 59 of the motor housing. The switch 24 may then be repaired or replaced by detaching it from the cleaner casing. If it is desired at any time to remove the insert nut 45, the procedure is the same as above for replacing the switch after removal of the rear wheel attachment bolt 46.

In the operation of the suction cleaner, the suction cleaner may be moved from place to place where it is being used and the operator is able to energize and deenergize the motor by imparting a slight forward and downward motion to the pedal 38 with the foot as in a normal stepping operation. The foregoing operation rotates the pedal 38 on the depending boss 44 which rests on the lower end of the bracket 3U contiguous to the latch 32. The normal spring pressure for returning the reciprocal plunger 26 of the switch mechvanism is sufcient to return the switch pedal 38 to its normal position, as shown in Figure 2, in leither the on or oif position of the switch as the operators foot is removed from the pedal.

'The location of the foot pedal switch upon the rear lend of the motor housing and the mounting thereof for lpivotal movement downward enables the foot switch assembly to be operated by a slight motion of the operators foot from a normal standing position.

The arrangement of the switch pedal retainer spring and the switch pedal construction is such that the switch pedal is locked in assembled position, is free from rattling or vibration and prevents accidental removal of the wheel securing `nut 45.

The improved switch pedal construction and mounting and actuating mechanism `therefor is inexpensive to construct, easy to operate, very efficient in use and ris adaptedvfor utilizing standf `6 vard push-type switches which lare commercially available.

The construction of the novel foot actuated switch mechanism of the preferred embodiment of the invention, the operation thereof and the method of applying the same to use will be readily understood. It is to be understood that there -has been provided a simple, inexpensive and efcient foot switch assembly for carrying out the yobjects of the invention. Although only one embodiment of the foot lswitch assembly 4of this invention as adapted to perform the functions set forth has been disclosed, it is evident that various vchanges of forni, proportions and the minor details of construction may be taken without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In an electrically operated appliance, a hollow casing, a switch in said casing having a portion including a pressure operated actuating member projecting through an opening in said casing, a bracket on said casing having an opening through which said portion of said switch projects, Ameans engaging said bracket and said portion of said switch for securing said bracket and said switch to said casing, a pedal for applying pressure to said actuating member, and a spring latch for detachably securing said pedal to said bracket, said pedal overlying and concealing said bracket, said latch and the projecting parts of said switch.

2. In an electrically operated appliance, a hollow casing having a rearwardly and upwardly facing recess formed with an opening into said casing, a switch in said casing having a securing part carrying a pressure operated actuating member projecting through said opening into said recess, a bracket in said recess having an opening through which said securing part projects, means engaging said bracket and said securing part for fastening said switch and said bracket to said casing, a pedal for applying operating pressure to said member, a spring latch secured to the underside of said pedal, said bracket being formed with an opening through which said latch projects to engage ysaid bracket to secure said pedal in operating position, and said pedal being positioned to close said recess and conceal said switch, said bracket and said latch.

3. In an electrically operated appliance, a hollow casing having a rearwardly and upwardly facing recess formed with an opening into said casing, a switch in said casing having a securing par-t carrying a pressure operated actuating member projecting through said opening into said recess, a bracket in said recess having an opening through which said securing part projects, means engaging said bracket and said securing part for fastening said switch and said bracket to said casing, a pedal for applying operating pressure to said member, a spring latch secured to the undersideof said pedal, said bracket being formed with an opening through which said latch projects -to engage said bracket to secure said pedal in operating position, said pedal being positioned to close said recess and conceal said switch, said bracket and said latch, said casing having a lip overhanging a portion of said recess, and a projecting member on said pedal underlying said lip :to limit non-operating movement of said `pedal by engaging under said lip.

4. In an electrically operated appliance, a casing, 4a switch on said casing including `a reciprocable operating plunger, an ornamental actuating member covering said switch and positioned to transmit operating pressure to said plunger, a support bracket secured to said casing under said actuating member, and a spring latch secured to the underside of said actuating member and resiliently engageable with said bracket in response to the application of pressure to said actuating member to secure said member in operating position and said casing and actuating member being formed to admit a thin bladed tool beneath said member for disengaging said spring latch to remove said member.

5. An article of manufacture comprising a hollow bodied switch closure and actuating member open at its underside, and a resilient member xedly secured inside said hollow body, said resilient member having a switch engaging and actuating portion biased away from contact with said closure member and a resilient snap latch portion spaced from said switch actuating portion.

6. The combination in an electrical appliance comprising a housing having a recess therein, a switch mounted on said housing having an operating member extending into said recess, of a bracket mounted in the recess, a switch cover closing said recess and the switch and permitting actuation of the switch under an operator-applied force thereon, latching means formed on the cover and the kswitch Amounting bracket including a depending resilient latch extending below the switch mounting bracket within the recess, another recess formed in the housing extending into the first mentioned recess contiguous to the lower end of the cover and adapted to permit insertion of a tool to engage the depending latch whereby, upon application of operatorapplied force on the depending latch, the switch cover is adapted to be detached from the bracket and withdrawn from the recess.

7. In an electrical appliance, a casing having a recessed portion adapted to house a switch actuating means, aswitch in said casing having a spring pressed operating plunger extending into said recessed portion of said casing, a bracket in said recessed portion of said casing, an actuating member forming a closure for said recessed portion of said casing and overlying and concealing said bracket and said plunger, a spring latch detachably securing said actuating member to said bracket, and a rib on said actuating member bearing on said bracket and forming a pivot for said actuating member.

8. In an ambulatory electrical appliance, a casing having an upwardly and rearwardly facing recess; a detachable wheel mounting structure for supporting said appliance including a shaft engaging a part of said casing removed from said recess, a securing nut having a head portion in said recess and a sleeve portion received in an opening in said casing extending from said recess to the portion of said casing engaging said shaft, and a bolt extending through said shaft and into said opening to engage said nut for securing said shaft; a switch in said casing having an actuating part extending into said recess, a bracket in said recess having a portion overlying said nut and spaced therefrom a lesser distance than the length of said sleeve portion to prevent removal of said nut when said bolt is disengaged therefrom, a channel in said casing extending into said recess and receiving the headv of said nut to prevent rotation thereof, a pedal member for operating the actuating part of said switch overlying and covering said recess, and a resilient latch carried'on the underside of said 8 pedal and releasably engaging said bracket adjacent said nut to secure said pedal to said casing, said channel providing an access opening into said recess to accommodate a tool for releasing said latch.

9. In an, electrically operated appliance, a casing having a rearwardly and upwardly facing recess therein, a switch in said casing having a spring pressed reciprocable operating plunger extending into said recess, a bracket in said recess through which said plunger extends, a common means for securing said switch and said bracket to said casing, a pedal forming a closure for said recess and concealing said plunger and bracket positioned to transmit operating pressure to said plunger, means on said bracket and said pedal forming a pivot for said pedal when engaged with each other, a snap spring latch secured to the underside of said pedal detachably engaged with said bracket to retain said pedal on said bracket and said pivot forming means in engagement, and an extension on said pedal extending into a recess in said casing to limit upward and outward movement of said pedal under the bias of said plunger.

10. An ambulatory electrical appliance having a wheel supported casing and a propelling handle attached to said casing, a control switch and actuating structure comprising, a switch in said. casing of the type having an operating part for actuating said switch to open and closed circuit positions in response to successive applications of pressure thereto, a pedal for applying operating pressure to said operating part, said pedal having a pressure applying surface positioned below said handle at the rear of the casing and facing rearwardly and upwardly of the casing at a substantial angle to the horizontal, means mounting said pedal on said casing for pivotal movement about a horizontal axis horizontally and vertically displaced from` the pressure applying surface, the angular relation of the pressure applying surface to the horizontal and the displacement of the said horizontal axis therefrom being such that pressure applied to the pressure applying surface forwardly or downwardly of the casing will pivot the pedal about said axis to actuate said switch.

ll. An ambulatory electrical appliance having a wheel supported casing and a propelling handle attached to said casing, a control switch and actuating structure comprising, a switch in said casing of the type having an operating part for actuating said switch to open 'and closed circuit positions in response to successive applications of pressure thereto, a pedal for applying operating pressure to said operating part, said pedal having a pressure applying surface positioned below said handle at the rear of the casing and facing rearwardly and upwardly of the casing at a substantial angle to the horizontal, means pivotally mounting the lower rear portion of said pedal on said casing for pivotal movement about a horizontal axis horizontally and vertically displaced from the pressure applying surface, the angular relation of the pressure applying surface to the horizontal and the displacement of the said horizontal axis therefrom being such that pressure applied to the pressure applying surface forwardly or downwardly of the casing will pivot the pedal about said axis to actuate said switch.

(References on following page) References Cited in the 111e of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Sargent Oct. 9, 1906 5 Plehaty Apr. 17, 1923 Child Mar. 15, 1938 Martinet Apr. 12, 1938 Jordan Dec. B, 1938 Brown Oct. 17, 1939 10 Number 10 Name Date Nicholas Mar. 9, 1943 Finlayson Mar. 7, 1944 Kroenlein Mar. 20, 1945 Hahn Mar. 19, 1946 Lofgren Apr. 1, 1947 Braun Nov. 2, 1948 Curtiss, Jr. Apr. 19, 1949 Stone et al. Dec. 19, 1950

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2974345 *Aug 8, 1958Mar 14, 1961Hoover CoCollapsible support for an ambulatory appliance
US3867591 *Jan 16, 1974Feb 18, 1975Whirlpool CoOne piece switch holder and foot operated hinge actuator for vacuum cleaner switch
US5671499 *Jan 11, 1996Sep 30, 1997Black & Decker Inc.Vacuum cleaner with all components in floor traveling head
US5765258 *Aug 29, 1997Jun 16, 1998Black & Decker Inc.Vacuum cleaner with all components in floor traveling head
US5991970 *Jan 21, 1998Nov 30, 1999Bissell Homecare, Inc.Upright vacuum cleaner with power switch pedal
US6640386Sep 18, 2001Nov 4, 2003The Hoover CompanyFloor cleaning unit with a brush assembly
US6832409Sep 18, 2001Dec 21, 2004The Hoover CompanyWet/dry floor cleaning unit and method of cleaning
US7533442Sep 28, 2004May 19, 2009Healthy Gain Investments LimitedWet/dry floor cleaning unit and method of cleaning
US8365347Aug 18, 2011Feb 5, 2013Techtronic Floor Care Technology LimitedWet/dry floor cleaning unit
US20050034266 *Sep 28, 2004Feb 17, 2005Morgan Jeffery A.Wet/dry floor cleaning unit and method of cleaning
US20050039297 *Sep 28, 2004Feb 24, 2005Morgan Jeffery A.Wet/dry floor cleaning unit and method of cleanig
US20100005613 *May 18, 2009Jan 14, 2010Morgan Jeffery AWet/dry floor cleaning unit and method of cleaning
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/61.58R, 15/412, 15/DIG.100, 15/354, 280/43.2
International ClassificationA47L5/28, H01H21/26, A47L9/28
Cooperative ClassificationY10S15/10, A47L9/2842, A47L5/28, H01H21/26, A47L9/2857
European ClassificationA47L9/28F, A47L9/28D2, H01H21/26, A47L5/28