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Publication numberUS2689365 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1954
Filing dateJul 20, 1951
Priority dateJul 20, 1951
Publication numberUS 2689365 A, US 2689365A, US-A-2689365, US2689365 A, US2689365A
InventorsJoel Koskela
Original AssigneeJoel Koskela
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lateral and longitudinal shoe stretcher
US 2689365 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 21, 1954 J. KOSKELA 2,689,355

LATERAL AND LONGITUDINAL SHOE STRETCHER Filed July 20, 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. JOEL KOSKELA Sept. 21, 1954 J. KOSKELA 2,689,365

LATERAL AND LONGITUDINAL SHOE STRETCHER Filed July 20, 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 VENTOR, JOEL KosKELA Arman/5y p 21, 1954 J. KOSKELA 2,689,365

LATERAL AND LONGITUDINAL SHOE STRETCHER Filed July 20, 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. JOEL KOSKELA Patented Sept. 21, 1954 UNITED LATERAL AND LONGITUDINAL SHOE STRETCHER Joel Koskela, New York, N. Y.

Application July 20, 1951, Serial No. 237,7 64

8 Claims. -1

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in a shoe stretcher and proposes certain improvements in the construction disclosed in my prior U. S. Patent No. 2,233,454 granted March 4, 1941.

More specifically, the present invention proposes an improved shoe stretcher which is ideal for breaking in new shoes by removing all stiffness and softening the inner sole to conform to the natural shape of the foot.

Still further, the present invention proposes an improved shoe stretcher having various adjustments for accomplishing the following operations on a shoe:

1. Lengthening the shoe.

2. Stretching and widening the toe box and in- The shoe stretcher is designed so that any of the above operations can be easily combined in a manner to stretch and widen any part of the shoe.

Another object of the present invention proposes constructing the shoe stretcher to include a pair of superimposed complementary blocks for insertion into the toe box of the shoe with means for spreading the blocks about their interconnected rear ends in a manner to stretch and widen the toe box.

The present invention further proposes providing the shoe stretcher with a heel piece which functions in conjunction with the superimposed blocks to lengthen the shoe and which is mounted in position in a manner to be rapidly brought into position within the heel of the shoe after a which the position of the heel piece can be adjusted by a threaded rotatively mounted tube for obtaining the desired tension on the shoe.

Still another object of the present invention proposes providing the upper block with adjustable plates raisable about the pivotally mounted front end of one of the plates in a manner to stretch and raise the instep portion of the shoe.

Another object of the present invention pro- Doses p v d g the lower block with removably attached side pieces which can be independently attached to the sides of the lower block to stretch and shape either the right or the left side of 2 the shoe or which can both be attached to the sides of the lower block in a manner to stretch the toe box to provide extra width.

The present invention further provides individual bunion pads which can be used separately or in various combinations and which can be mounted on the adjustable plates of the upper block or directly on the upper block when the adjustable plates are not being used for shaping the toe box to accommodate bunions and other toe deformities.

It is a further object of the present invention.

to construct an improved shoe stretcher which is simple and durable, which can be manufactured and sold for a reasonable cost and which is effective for itsintended purpose.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a shoe stretcher of the present invention as it would appear in position within the left shoe of a pair of shoes illustrated in outline by the dot and dash lines.

F 2 is a front elevational view of the shoe stretcher.

Fig.3 is a partial elevational view of theshoe stretcher looking at the rear side of Fig. 1..

Fig. 4 is a partial plan view of Fig. 1.

Fig. dis a longitudinal sectional view takenon the line 55 of Fi 4.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged perspective view of the mechanism contained between the adjacent,

faces of the blocks of the shoe stretcher.

Fig. '7 is an enlarged partial longitudinal sectional view taken on the line l-| of. Fig. 6.

Fig; 7A is an enlarged detailed sectional view taken on the line 1A.1A of, Fig. 7.

Fig. 8 is an enlarged detailed view looking in the direction of the line 88 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 9 is a view similar to a portion of Fig. 8. but showing a different position of the parts.

Fig. 10 is a side elevational view of the upper of the blocks with the upper plate shown inlongit'udinal section. V

Fig. 11 is a plan view of the lower block with one of the sidepieces removed and with a portion of the view shown in section.

Fig. 12 is an inside elevational view of one of the side pieces; per se.

Fig. 13 is an enlarged partial longitudinal sectional view taken on the line |3-|3 of Fig. 12.

Fig. 14: is an enlarged transverse sectional view of the heel piece taken on the line M-J l of Fig. 1.

Fig. 15 is a view similar to Fig. 14, but showing a different position of the parts.

Fig. 16 is a longitudinal sectional view of the heel piece taken substantially on the line 16-48 of Fig. 15.

Fig. 17 is an enlarged sectional view through the bunion pad taken substantially on the line ||l'| of Fig. 1.

Fig. 18 is a view similar to Fig. 17, but showing several bunion pads in a stacked position.

Fig. 19 is a bottom perspective view of one of the bunion pads, per se.

Before proceeding with the description of the shoe stretchenit is to be understood that they are constructed in pairs for use in each of the shoes of a pair of shoes with the stretcher blocks suitably shaped for use in ladies, mens or childrens shoes. On the drawings, there is illustrated a single stretcher of a pair of stretchers shaped for use in a ladys shoe. The stretcher illustrated is the left one and it is appreciated that the right one would be similarly constructed with appropriate parts of opposite hand to conform to the right shoe of the pair.

The shoe stretcher, according to the present invention, includes a bottom block 28 upon which there is superimposed an upper block 2|. The blocks 20 and 2| are molded of any desired light metallic alloy, but if desired could .be cut from hardwood or other materials. The adj aoent faces of the blocks-20 and 2| are formed with wedge hollows 22, see particularly Fig. 5. The wedge hollows are elongated longitudinally of the blocks 20 and 2| and are located substantially midway of the front and rear ends of the blocks.

Rearward of the wedge hollows 22, the superimposed blocks 29 and 2| are formed with vertically extended aligned holes 23 which are converged away from the meeting faces of the blocks. A vertically extended stud 24 has its opposed end portions extended into the holes 23 so as to retain the blocks 20 and 2| against relative longitudinal movement. The holes 23 are somewhat larger than the end portions of the stud 24 so that the blocks, 2!] and 2| are free for slight movement relative to each other and with relation to the stud 24. Extended rearward from the stud 24, there is a tubular extension 24 integral with the stud and concentric with a hole 25 formed in the stud. intermediate of its ends. The hole 24' ofthe stud2 iand theinterior of its tubular extension 24 are provided with a continuous interior thread, see particularly Fig. 7.

Extended through the stud 24 and its tubular extension 24 there'is an elongated shaft 25. The front end of the shaft 25 is provided with threads matching the internal threads of the stud 24 and its tubular extension Z t so that as the shaft is turned in one direction or the other the shaft will be moved longitudinally. Fixedly mounted on the rear end of the shaft '25 there is a handle 26, see Figs. 1 and 2, by which the the shaft can be conveniently turned in one direction or the other. The front end of the shaft 25 extends from the stud 24 and carries a wedge 21 which is positioned within the wedge hollows 22, see Fig. 5. The wedge 21 is frustoconical in shape, is molded of metal and has a recess 28 extended in from its fiat rear face,

4; see Figs. 5 and 7. Positioned within the recess 28 against the base wall of the recess 25 there is a free floating ball 29. The front end of the shaft 25 is extended into the recess is and abutted against the ball 29, as best shown in Fig. 7. Within the recess 28, the shaft 25 is formed witha reduced neck portion 3%. The wedge '2": is retained in position on the front end of the shaft 25 by means of spaced pins 3| which pass through the recess 28 of the wedge on opposite sides of the reduced neck portion with the ball 29 functioning as a bearing between the inner end of the shaft 25 and the base wall of the recess 28. With this construction, the wedge 2'! is universally mounted leaving the shaft free for independent rotation and at the same time leaving the wedge2l free to adjust its position with relation to the ball portion 23.

As the shaft 25 is turned to thread itself inward, the wedge 21 is moved forward between the adjacent faces of the blocks 29 and El. The wedge 21 is positioned in the wedge hollows .22 which have their adjacent faces converged forwardly so that as the wedge 21 is moved forward the blocks '20 and 2| are caused to move apart. Rearward movement of the wedge 21 frees the blocks 2c and 2| to move together.

Lock means is provided for connecting the rear ends of the blocks 2eand 2| together to provide a fulcrum about which the blocks will move apart as the wedge 2'! is moved forward. The blocks are shaped to be extended into the toe box of a shoe, indicated in outline by the dot and dash lines 32 on Fig. 1, so that as the front ends of the blocks 2:: and 2| are moved apart about their connected rear ends, the toe box will be stretched.

The lock means for the rear ends of the blocks 20 and 2| is characterized by a locking member 33, see particularly Figs. 5 and 7 to 9, which is rotatively positioned on the tubular extension 2d of the stud 24. The locking member has, on diametrically oppositesides, latch elements 3d which are directed in opposite directions. Extended rearwardly from the latch elements 3 i there are lugs 35 by which a finger grip can be had on the locking member 23 for turning the same in one direction or the other.

The rear ends of the blocks 2e and 25 are hollowed out to receive the locking meme 3 5, see Fig. 5, and each of the blocks within its hollowed out portion is formed with a keeper element 365. As in the case of the latch elements 34, the keeper elements 36, see Figs. and 9, are directed in opposite directions. Contacting faces of the latch elements 3t and the seep-er elements 36 are cam shaped to ride over one another so as to draw the rear ends of he blocks 26 and 2| together when the locking member is turned to its locked position shown in 8. However, there is sufficient looseness in the fit of those interengaged parts to permit the blocks '20 and 2| to move away from each other about their connected rear ends.

Arcuately shaped springs sec mediate of their ends on the out ments 3% engaged by the latch eleme ts 3d, are

formed with inwardly extended hook portions as. The hook portions engage the latch elements 3 in the closed position of the lockin member 33 shown in Fig. 8, to retain the latch elements in engagement with the keeper elements 36. However, by grasping the locking member 33 by the lugs 35 it can be turned in a counter-clockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 8 to move the outer faces of the latch elements 34 past the hook portions 39 to the position shown in Fig. 9. In that position, the latch elements 34 are completely disengaged from the keeper elements 35 and the top block is free to be lifted off the lower block 2!. To reassemble the block 23 and 2| the above procedure is reversed.

Fitted into position over that portion of the shaft which extends rearward from the rear end of the tubular extension 24 of the stud 24, there is an externally threaded tube All. .The tube is considerably shorter than the shaft 25 and is formed at its front end with a reduced portion 40 forming an outwardly extended flange 4| of the same external diameter as the tubular extension 24 The flange 4| has its front face resting against the rear end of the tubular extension 24 see Fig. 7. A collar 42 encircles the rear end of the tubular extension il and the front end of the tube 40. The collar 42 is secured to the tubular extension 24 by several pins 43 extended radially inward from opposite sides of the collar. At its rear end over the reduced portion 40 of the shaft 40, the collar 42 is formed with oppositely disposed slots 42. A metal band 44 is forced through one of the slots 42 and engaged about the reduced portion 40 of the tube 45 behind the flange 4| rotatively connecting the tube to the collar 42.

In Figs. 7 and 7A the thicknesses of the ports is somewhat exaggerated but their relationship is shown. Thus, the collar 42 functions to rotatively connect the tube 40 to the rear end of the tubular extension 24 and to maintain the locking member 33 rotatively in position upon the tubular extension.

The tube 40 is free to be rotated in one direction or the other relative to the tubular extension 24 and relative to the shaft 25. As in the case of the shaft 25, the rear end of the tube 46 is pro vided with a handle 45, see Figs. 1 to 3, by which the tube lii can be conveniently turned in one direction or the other.

Adiustably positioned on the tube 49 between the collar M and the handle 45, there is a heel piece 45. The heel piece i6 consists of a metallic block 41 formed at its front end with a depending portion -S which has its rear face rounded to conform to the shape of the heel portion of shoes within which it is to be fitted. ,The front face of the depending portion 48 is formed with a recess 48, see Fig. 3, for reducing the metallic mass and so lighten the heel piece 46. The block 4? is formed with a longitudinally extended passageway 5% which is unthreaded and through which the tube 40 has a sliding fit, see Fig. 16. Between its ends, the top of the block 41 is formed with a cutout 5| which exposes the threaded top porexpansion springs located on opposite sides of the tube. The bottom ends of the springs 55 are extended into holes 58 formed in the top face of the block 47 and the top ends of the springs are extended into holes 5'! formed in the bottom face of the latch block 52. The springs 55 urge the latch block 52 upward against the inner face of the roof wall 53 disengagin the threads of the latch block from the threads of the tube 40 leaving the heel piece 45 free to be slid to the desired position along the length of the tube 46.

Means is provided for retaining the latch block 52in lowered operative position against the action of the springs 55 so that the heel piece 46 can only be moved along the length of the tube ll] by rotating the same. The latch block retaining means comprises an elongated rod 58 of a length corresponding to the length of the metallic block t1 and which is rotatively supported between the upstanding end portions of the block 4? and the roof wall 53. Extending radially from the rod 58, there is an elongated handle 59 which projects through a laterally extended slot 55 formed in the roof wall 53. Intermediate of its ends, the elongated rod 58 is formed with a cutout 66, see Figs. 14 to 16, which is on the side opposed to the handle 59 and which is of a length sli htly greater than the length of the latch block 52. When the handle 55 is in the lowered position shown in Fig. la, the rounded side of the rod 58 bears against the top face of the latch block 52 and retains that latch block lowered against the action of the springs 55. On the other hand, when the handle is raised to the vertical position shown in Fig. 15, the rod 58 is turned to a position in which its out out Si is aligned with the latch block 52 freeing the same to be urged upward by the springs 55. In that position, the threads of the latch block 52 will be disengaged from the threads of the tube 55 so that the heel piece is free to be slidalong the length of the tube to the desired position at which the heel piece it is to be located in the heel of the shoe. The latch block 52 is then lowered against the action of the springs 55 to engage the threads of the tube 40 so thatfihal adjustments of the heel piece 56 within the heel of the shoe 3?. is accomplished by turning the tube 49 by means of the handle, 45. Adjustments of the heel piece 45 within the heel of the shoe 3?: will force the superimposed blocks 25 and 25 into position in the toe box to lengthen the shoe.

As shown in Fig. 16, a coil spring 62 is engaged I about a reduced portion 58 of the rod 58. The

tion of the tube 40 where it passes through the passageway 55. Slidably fitted in the cutout 5! for vertical movement, there is a latch block 52 which has a threaded bottom face to fit over the top of the tube 40 in threaded engagement therewith, as shown in Fig. 14, requiring rotation of the tube to move the heel piece 46 along the length of the tube.

The latch block 52 is retained in position within the cutous 5! for the required vertical sliding movement by a roof wall 53 which has depending side portions secured to the block 4'! at the upstanding end portions thereof by screws 54.

The latch block 52 is moved upward out of engagement with the threads of the tube 40 by coil spring 62 is under tension and has one end secured to the reduced portions 58 and its other end anchored to the material of the block 4? turning the rod 58 to the positionin which it holds the latch block 52 in its lowered operative position shown in Fig. 14. Positioned at the side of the heel piece 45 opposed to the side from which the handle 59 extends, when in its laterally extended position shown in Fig. 14, there is an inverted U-shaped handle 63. The bottom ends of the U-shaped handle 63 are mounted in position by the same screws 54 which secure the adjacent side of the roof wall 53 in position. By simultaneously gripping the handles 59 and 63 and squeezing the handle 59 toward the handle '63 against the action of the spring 62, a convenient grip is provided for moving the rod 58 to its inoperative position shown in Figs. 15 and 16 in which the latch block 52 is freed to be urged upward by the springs 55. Immediately as the grip on the handles 59 and 63 is released, the coil spring 62 will turn the rod 58 back to its starting position shown in Fig. 14.

The top face of the upper block 2| is cut away at its front end to accommodate the front edge of an instep plate 64 which is curved laterally to extend across the top face of the block 2|. The front end of the instep plate 64 is pivoted to the upper block 2! by means of a loose nut and bolt assembly 65, see particularly Fig. 5. At its free rea end, the instep plate 6 4 is provided with a pivotally mounted latch lever 66 having an intermediate portion extended pivotally through a slot 81 formed in the instep plate 64. Above the slot '37, the latch lever 66 continues into a curved handle portion 66 by which a grip can be had for lifting the instep plate 64 about its pivoted front end. The latch lever 66 at the bottom face of the instep plate 64 is formed with laterally extended shoulders 66', see Fig. l, which engage the material of the instep plate 64 at the ends of the slot 5? holding the latch lever 66 from being pulled upward through the slot 6'5. The top face of the upper block 21 beneath the instep plate S is formed with transversely extending notches 38 with which the free end of the latch lever 55 is selectively engageable for holding the instep plate Ed in various raised positions about the pivoted front end of that plate. When the latch lever 66 is disengaged from the notches 68, the instep plate 64 can be laid fiat against the top face of the upper block 2| with the latch lever in position between the adjacent faces thereof. In its various raised positions, the instep plate 61 5 will function to stretch and widen the instep of the shoe 32 independent of any other adjust ments made to the shoe.

Provided for use in connection with the instep plate fie, there is an arched plate 69 which extends across the entire width of the instep plate 5 and from the front end of the upper block 2 l to the rear edge of the instep plate. At its rear end, the arched plate 69 is formed with a transverse slot if! by which the arched plate 59 can be hooked in position over the free end of the handle portion 66 of the latch lever 66. With the arched plate 59 in position, raising of the instep plate id will cause the arched plate 69 to assume an inclined position between the front end of the upper block 2! and the top edge of the instep plate 64. tion, the toe box of the shoe willbe stretched simultaneously with widening and stretching of the instep of the shoe. However, the arched plate 69 can be removed, when it is not to be used, by lifting its front end while moving the rear end along the handle portion 66 to slip the slotted end of the arched plate off the free end of the handle portion 65* of the latch lever 66.

Bunion pads H are provided for use with the arched plate 6a or for use with the instep plate t l and upper block 2|, when the arched plate 53 is not being used, for deforming the side walls of the toe box of the shoe 32 to accommodate bunions or other toe deformities. The bunion pads H are hollow elliptically shaped members formed of metal and having pins 12 molded into their hollow faces and extended from the open sides thereof. Adjacent the pins 12 each pad ii is formed with a hole 13. The front end of the upper blockfl, the front end portion of the instep plate 54 and the front end portion of the arched plate 69 are formed with holes 5 -5 with which the pins 12 of the bunion pads H can be selectively engaged, as shown in Figs. 17 and 18.

The arrangement of the holes 14 is such that Thus, with the arched plate to in posithe pads H can be positioned at the desired position with relation to the portion of the toe box of the shoe Which is to be deformed. Each shoe stretcher is provided with a group of bunion pads ll of different circumferential sizes for selective use or for use in combination with each other as shown in Fig. 18. The bunion pads ll when used in combination are stacked with the largest one located immediately adjacent the stretcher and in diminishing size outward therefrom. The pin E2 of the lowermost pad "ii is engaged with the respective hole 14 of the respective part of the shoe stretcher and the pins 12 of the outermost pads I! are engaged with the holes "E3 of the underneath pads. When several of the bunion pads are stacked extreme deformation of the toe box is achieved to provide for extremely large, troublesome bunions.

Extended along the sides of the bottom block 2%, there are side pieces 13 constructional details of which are shown in Figs. 11 to 13. Each of the side pieces '53 molded of metal and shaped to fit snugly against its respective side of the bottom block 29. Inwardly-of the sides of the side walls of the bottom block 2%, there are recesses M, along opposite sides of the respective wedge hollow 22, see Fig. 11, which divide off upstanding side walls 55. Each side wall is v formed with a spaced pair of holes 16 and The inner face of each side piece it is formed with a fixed hook which extends into the respec tive hole it. The hooks F3 are of tapered con-- struction with their ends adjacent the side pieces '53 of the same Width as the respective holes "5?: so as to hold the side pieces ES against longitudinal movement relative to the bottom block 23.

Rearward of the hooks 78, the inner faces of the side pieces 13 are formed with cutouts 1'9, see Figs. 12 and 13, which open to the rear ends of the side pieces l3. Positioned within the cutout 19, there are elongated arms at which are pivotally supported at their front ends on pins 8| mounted across the cutouts it at the front ends thereof. Extended laterally inward from the inner faces of the arms so, there are hooks 32 which are passed through the holes ii and engaged with the material to the side walls $5 at the front ends of the holes ii. The holes H are large enough to admit the free ends of the hooks 82 and to permit the required forward movement of the side pieces 73 as controlled by the engagement of the hooks '18 with the holes it.

The free rear ends of the arms continue into grip portions 83 which extend from the open rear ends of the cutouts 19 and by which the arms 86 can be pivoted to disengage the hooks 82 from the material of the Walls "5 to free the side pieces 13 to be removed when desired. The arms 89 are resiliently retained in their operative position by means of springs 85 positioned in the cutouts 19 between the material of the side pieces 73 defining the outer sides of the cutouts and the adjacent sides of the arms 35. The springs 85 have the free ends of their arms turned outward to engage holes 86 formed in the material of the side pieces and holes 8l' formed in the arms 80 intermediate of their ends and rearward of the pivot pins 8!.

The front ends of the arms 80 are shaped to provide cams 88, see Fig. 13, which are shaped to engage the material of the side pieces 13 at the front ends of the cutouts 19 to limit the action o the p gs 85 in pivoting the arms 80 outward. Pivoting is limited at the point where the hooks 82 will be engaged with the material of the side walls 15 at the front of the holes 11, as best shown at the top of Fig. 11. To free the side pieces 13 to be removed, it is merely necessary to pivot the arms '80 outward by means of the grip portions 83 and against the action of the springs 85. Such pivotal action disengages the hooks 82 from the material of the side walls 15 and frees the side pieces I3 to be pivoted outward about the front ends thereof withdrawing the hooks 18 from the holes 16 completely disengaging the side pieces.

It is appreciated that the shoe stretcher can be used without either of the side pieces 13. If

desired, both of the side pieces 13 can be mounted in position at the sides of the bottom block 20 so as to produce extra width in the shoe 32 as the superimposed blocks 20 and 2| are forced into position within the toe box of the shoe. On the other hand, the shoe stretcher can be used with one or the other of the side pieces 13 mounted in position at the side of the bottom block so as to stretch either the right or the left side of the shoe 32.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise construction herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes and modifications coming within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

1. A shoe stretcher comprising a pair of superimposed complementary blocks having aligned said shaft, a locking member freely rotatively mounted on said extension and having latch elements engaging said keeper elements to join the rear ends of said blocks, springs on said keeper elements and engaging said latch elements for retaining said member in a rotative position in which said latch elements are engaged with said keeper elements, a tube rotatively engaged over the rear end of said shaft and abutted against the rear end of said extension, a heel piece adjustably mounted on said tube, and a collar rotatively connecting said tube to the rear end of said tubular extension and maintaining said member rotatively in position on said tubular extension, said heel piece having a block slidably positioned on said tube intermediate of its ends, a depending portion on said block shaped to fit in the heel of a shoe, a movably mounted latch block mounted in a cutout in said first block and having a threaded surface engageable with external threads on said tube, resilient means holding said latch block in a position raised off said tube in which said first-mentioned block is free to be slid along the length of said tube, and manually releasable means for holding said latch block in a position in which its threads are engaged with the threads of said tube so that said 10 heel piece can only be adjusted along the length of said tube by turning said tube.

2. A shoe stretcher, comprising a pair of superimposed complementary blocks having aligned wedge hollows in their adjacent faces, a vertically extended stud mounted between the rear ends of said blocks retaining said blocks against relative longitudinal movement, a shaft engaged through said stud intermediate of its ends and having threaded engagement therewith, a wedge rotatively mounted on the front end of said shaft and engaging said wedge hollows for moving said blocks apart as said shaft isturned, a keeper element formed. within a hollow in the rear end of each of said blocks, a tubular extension extended rearward from said stud concentric with said shaft, a member freely rotatively mounted on said extension and having latch elements engaging said keeper elements to join the rear ends of said blocks, springs on said keeper elements and engaging said latch elements for retaining said member in a rotative position in which said latch elements are engaged with said keeper elements, a tube rotatively engaged over the rear end of said shaft and abutted against the rear end of said extension, a heel piece adjustably mounted on said tube, and a collar rotatively connecting said tube to the rear end of said tubular extension and maintaining said member rotatively in position on said tubular extension, an instep plate arched to extend over the rear portion of said upper last block, a loose nut and bolt assembly connecting the front end of said instep plate to the front end of said bottom lastblock, and means at the rear end of said instep plate for holding the same in a rearwardly inclined position relative to said upper last block, said instep plate holding means including a handle portion extended rearward from the rear edge of said instep plate, and an arched plate positioned over said instep plate from the front end of said upper block to the upper rear edge of said instep plate, said arched plate having a slot in its rear end by which said arched plate can be removably engaged in position over said handle portion.

3. A shoe stretcher comprising a pair of superimposed complementary blocks having aligned wedge means, a threaded shaft rotatably engag ing said blocks, a heel piece adjustably mounted on said shaft, a latch block on said shaft in complementary engagement with said heel piece, resilient means on said heel piece urging said latch block into a position to be raised off said shaft, and cam means rotatably held on said latch block to move said latch block against the force of the resilient means. 1

4. The structure of claim 3, wherein said heel piece and latch block include aligned apertures, said resilient means being retained within said apertures, and a depending portion on said heel piece with a rear face rounded to conform to the shape of the heel portion of a shoe.

5. The structure of claim 3, wherein said heel piece includes a longitudinal passageway to fit around the shaft, and a cut-out in said heel pie-c said latch block being slidably fitted in the cutout for vertical movement.

6. The combination of claim 5, said longitudinal passageway being unthreaded and said latch block having a threaded bottom face engaging said shaft, requiring rotation of the shaft to move the heel piece along the length of the shaft.

'7. The combination of claim 6 wherein the cam means comprises an elongated rod having a cutout surface and an elongated handle, a roof wall 11 secured to said heel piece and rotatably supporting said cam, and a coil spring anchored on said heel piece and engaging said cam means, to hold the latch block in engagement with the shaft.

8. The combination of claim '7 wherein a U- shaped handle is secured on said heel piece and is adapted to be simultaneously engaged with said elongated handle to assist in overcoming the force of the coil spring to release the latch block from engagement with the shaft.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Number Number 15 7,000

Name Date Mal'mberg Sept. 21, 1909 Bassett July 25, 1911 De Paul et a1 Apr. 22, 1924 La Marca et a1 May 7, 1935 Panes Jan. 11, 1938 Cirelli Feb. 1, 1938 Koskela Mar. 4, 1941 Gregory Sept. 18, 1945 Rinnela July 29, 1947 Galterio Nov; 22, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Great Britain Apr, 5, 1895

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US1491135 *May 15, 1923Apr 22, 1924De Paul JohnTriple-action shoe stretcher
US2000340 *Oct 30, 1933May 7, 1935La Marca PatsyShoe stretching last
US2104839 *Mar 29, 1937Jan 11, 1938Apostole PanosShoe stretcher
US2107140 *Jan 27, 1937Feb 1, 1938Frank CirelliShoe stretcher
US2233454 *Jun 15, 1940Mar 4, 1941Joel KoskelaShoe stretching last
US2385270 *Dec 11, 1941Sep 18, 1945Gregory Hilton CharlesBoot and shoe stretching device
US2424669 *Oct 20, 1945Jul 29, 1947Andrew RinnelaShoe stretcher
US2488720 *Oct 2, 1948Nov 22, 1949Elia GalterioShoe stretcher
GB189507000A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7287293 *Aug 12, 2005Oct 30, 2007Nike, Inc.Custom fit system with adjustable last and method for custom fitting athletic shoes
US7757325Oct 4, 2007Jul 20, 2010Nike, Inc.Custom fit system and method for custom fitting athletic shoes
US7980007Jul 16, 2010Jul 19, 2011Nike, Inc.Custom fit system with adjustable last and method for custom fitting athletic shoes
US7992243Jul 19, 2010Aug 9, 2011Nike, Inc.Custom fit system with adjustable last and method for custom fitting athletic shoes
US8001642 *Jun 2, 2006Aug 23, 2011Nike, Inc.Shoe tree with variable geometry
Classifications
U.S. Classification12/116.2, 12/115.2
International ClassificationA43D3/00, A43D3/08
Cooperative ClassificationA43D3/08
European ClassificationA43D3/08