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Publication numberUS2689530 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1954
Filing dateJun 26, 1950
Priority dateJun 26, 1950
Publication numberUS 2689530 A, US 2689530A, US-A-2689530, US2689530 A, US2689530A
InventorsHarvey Leo M
Original AssigneeHarvey Leo M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for dispensing liquids
US 2689530 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 21, 1954 L, M, HARVEY 2,689,530

MACHINE FOR DISPENSING LIQUIDS Filed June 26, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Sept. 21, 1954 L. M. HARVEY MACHINE FOR DISPENSING LIQUIDS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 26, 1950 Patented Sept. 21, 1954 U N I D S TATES PATENT F Fl C E :MACHINE FOR DISPENSING LIQUIDS Leo M. .Harvey,;Los Angeles; Calif.

Application AJune 26, 1950,"Serai"No.170;354

(Cl. S-e148) 5 Claims. 1 This :invention relates to -a machine for dispensing` `liquids and it is a general object of the invention to provide `a machine or mechanism useful generally for handling liquids and which is :particularly applicable to vending machines where liquid is to be handled or dispensed in measured quantities.

A general object of the invention is to provide a machine of the general character 'referred -to Which is of simple and inexpensive construction, which is positiveand accurate-in operation and which is simple and convenient to service.

f-A general object of-this invention isf-to provide a liquid Ahandling or dispensingjmechanism that can be employed to advantage in liquid-"vending machines, the mechanism being characterized by pincher type chokes controlling the inletVand outlet of Aliquid relative `to a 'measuring cell and apincheritype-press collapsing the cellto discharge liquid therefrom.

Another object of this-invention is toprovide awmach-ineof the generalchaiacter referred lto characterized by pivotally mounted cam operated carriers operating parts that cooperate'toact on the liquid carrying unit.- y

It is a further object `of the'inventioneto-provide za" mechanism `of fthe generar-character referred to `in which-an operating meansiiswprovided "for the: elements acting onthe liquid can rying` unit,` which operating means involves l`a single `cam shaft operatingv ai plurality V-oi control cams so that thermechanismA operates in f-al ipredeterminedfmanner` when' the 1 shaft is rotated.

It isa furtherfobject offthe'linvention to prof. vide `a mechanism-I of Lthe general character referred to involvingl few, lsirnple, `easily-formed partsf that are `convenient to: mount ready -for operation, .and which are suclias to operateaccurately and dependablyf-@over alongtperiod of time without requiring `servicing or repair;

In the machine provided by the `inventionktliere isfaframe that carries-thelworkingparts and La container 'is `supported by the frame and carries asupply of liquid. Ai.liquidhandlingunitT re`-y The saidun'it tical sectionalvew of parts shown in Fig. 1,Ibeing. 'y

"The inlet choke preferably involvesrelatively movableshoes at -opposite'sides ofthe inlet `duct and carriers that -support `the shoes for the desired` relative movement, that is, for movement between aposition where the inlet duct is open orunobstructed and an actuated 'posi-tion where the inlet duct `is collapsed or choked so that liquid cannot flow therethrough. In the vpreferred forin of the invention the carriers are pivotally mounti edand theymay be carried onseparate mounting-posts.

The outlet choke preferably'corresponds in construction with the inlet choke except that it cooperatively engages the outlet duct. VThe collapsing means for the cell may correspond inconstruction with the chokes except that it has pressureplates that engage the cellinstead ofthe shoes that engage the ducts. In a preferred ernbodiment of lthe invention the carriers `of the chokesandof the collapsing means are carried on two posts which are parallel and spaced apart.

-An operating `means Aactuates the carriers of the chokesand the carriers -of the collapsing means. In the preferred form of the invention the carriers kof the inlet choke havearms with a tension spring connected between them normally yieldinglyr holding the carriers so that the shoes thereof-are apart. 'l In like'manner` arms and tension springsare provided on the carriers of the Aoutlet choke `and of the collapsing means.

"The operating -'means further includes cam means operating the carriers above referred to and `it preferably involves a single rotating cam shaft with an inlet cam thereon operating the inlet choke, an outlet cam operatingan outlet choke and "a `pressure {sami/operating' the collapsing mea-ris.` "The i cams are operatively connected with thecarriersto be actuated thereby and it is'fpreferred that` the "operating connections be through cam followers `and yielding means such as compression springs, which provide for overtravel'of the followers. `lhecarnshaft is driven by power means, for instance, by means of a motor throughs, speed reducingmechanism.

The various Aobjects and featuresof myinvention will'be fully understood from 'the following detailed description of'a typical preferred form and application of the invention, throughout which description reference is madeto the accompanying' drawings, in which:

1 isa Avertical view of amechanism embodying thel present invention with certain `parts broken away tofshow in section. Fig..2 is a vera View taken as vindicated `by line"`2-"2 on Fig. l.

and showing the parts related as they are when the machine is in the normal unactuated condition. Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing the machine partially operated so that both chokes are engaged, closing both ducts. Fig. 4 is a view similar to Figs. 2 and 3, showing the machine further operated, in which case the inlet duct remains closed while the outlet duct is open and the cell is being collapsed. Fig. 5 is an enlarged plan section of the inlet choke, being a view taken as indicated by line 5-5 on Fig. 1. Fig. 6 is an enlarged plan section showing the collapsing means, being a view taken as indicated by line 6 6 on Fig. 1, and Fig. 7 is an enlarged plan section of the outlet choke, being a view taken as indicated by line 'I-'I on Fig. 1.

The mechanism provided by this invention is useful, generally, where liquid is to be dispensed, and is particularly useful where liquid is to be dispensed in measured quantities, as, for example, in a liquid Vending machine, or the like. The particular form of the invention shown in the drawings is intended for use in a vending machine, or in a like situation, and it may be adapted to handle liquid from containers of different types, as for instance, containers such as are the subject of my copending applications entitled Mechanism for Dispensing Liquid and Liquid Dispensing Machine, Serial No. 170,352, now Patent No. 2,647,661 and 170,353, respectively, filed on even date herewith. Further, the present invention may be adapted to or incorporated in multiple machines where liquid is handled from a plurality of containers and in such case suitable controls may be provided, such as are set forth in my copending application entitled Mechanism for Dispensing Liquid above iden-y tied.

The machine as shown in the drawings involves, generally, a frame A, a liquid carrying container B, a liquid handling unit C with an inlet duct I, a collapsible cell II and an outlet duct I2, a closure means or inlet choke D, a closure means or outlet choke E, cell collapsing means F, operating means Gfor the chokes, and collapsing means and drive means H for the operating means G.

The frame A may, in practice, vary widely in` form and construction, and serves primarily as a mounting or carrier for the other parts of the machine. Further, the containerv B mayvvary widely in form and construction, as I have indicated above. In the case illustrated it is a simple liquid carrying container with a liquid outlet or delivery fitting at its bottom.

The liquid handling unit C is arranged to receive liquid from the tting I5 and may be applied directly thereto, as shown in the drawings. In its preferred form the unit C is a single body or structure formed of rubber, or rubber-like material, and the inlet duct of the unit is a simple, elongate tube open at its upper end for application to or connection with the tting I5. The collapsible cell I I is an elongate tubular part in communication with the lower end of the inlet tube I and is preferably of a predetermined capacity. 'Ihe outlet duct I2 is an elongate tubular part with its upper end in communication with the cell I I. The lower end portion I2a of the duct I2 preferably closes the duct and is subject to being severed from the balance of the duct, as along a line I6, when the structure is made ready for operation.

In a typical application of the invention the unit C, above described, may be a thin-walled 4 rubber or rubber-like element of inexpensive manufacture and may be sealed with or applied to the container B tobe installed in the machine with the container, which may be a paper carton or other cheap unit, expendable when empty.

The closure means or inlet choke D, best shown in Fig. 5 of the drawings, is characterized by two relatively movable shoes 2|) located at opposite sides of the inlet duct I0 of unit C. Carriers 2| support the shoes 2l) and are movable or shiftable to operate the shoes between positions where they are apart, as shown in Fig. 5, leaving the inlet duct open and free to pass liquid, and an operated position where the shoes are in, or in pressure engagement with the duct I0, collapsing it as shown in Figs. 3 and 4, in which casethe duct I0 is closed against the passage of fluid.

In the preferred form of the invention the carriers 2| are pivotally supported on one or more pivotal mountings or posts. In the case illustrated each carrier 2| is supported on a post 22 and the posts are parallel and spaced apart so that the carriers 2| are clear of each other.; By spacing the pivotal mountings of the carriers the shoes 20 remain in substantial parallelism throughout operation so that there is little or no tendency for the inlet duct to be squeezed from between the shoes as the mechanism operates.

The closure means or outlet choke, best shown in Fig. 7 of the drawings, may be the same in construction as the means C just described. Asv shown in the drawings, the choke means E includes shoes 25 at opposite sides of the outlet duct I2 and the shoes 25 are supported by car-- riers 26 pivotally mounted on posts 22 in the manner described with reference to the carriers 2|. In Fig. 7 of the drawings the carriers are shown operated so that the shoes 25 are in pressure engagement with the outlet duct I2 closing'it against the passage of iluid.

'I'he collapsing means F, best shown in Fig.

6 of the drawings, may be of the type of con-- struction employed in the means C and E. As shown in the drawings the means VF may include pressure shoes or plates 28 at opposite sides of the collapsible cell II and the shoes 28 may be supported byrcarriers 29 supported byposts 22.

. It is notable that in accordance with the preferred Vform of the inventionthe carriers 2|, 26 and 29 are supported by commonposts22 yso that only two posts are required in the machine.

When such construction is Vemployed spacers 30- may be provided between the carriers on the` posts so that the carriers areY located in the desired spacedl relation lengthwise of the posts; It will be apparent how the posts'can be readilyv mounted in or supported from this frame.

The operating means for the carriers 2| of the inlet choke is shown as including aspring 40. normally yieldingly urging the carriers 2| `apart.

so that they are spaced in a manner such as is shown in Fig. 5 of the drawings. -Inthe case il' lustrated the carriers have arms 1I I projecting therefrom so they are spaced apart and the spring squeeze or collapse the inlet duct Ill and thus stop flow therethrough. v

In the preferred form of the invention the camY means involves a cam 45 on arotating cam shaftv 46 and suitable operating or driving connections between the cam 45 and the carriers 2|. In the case illustrated the desired connections between,

tliowni andicanlers areliprovidd through Vcam followrsl'fthat are#l operated by the `cani and springsllvwhlchlcommnnioate motionlfrom the followerswftol the camels and provide Yfor 'overtravel for fthe followers "after the carriers have beensmoved voorronden-where the zuvare in:nillfoiampns@lensasementwithi the inlet *duct M. In the preferred rarrangement there is a cam follower fforeachfcanierl'l and the cam` followersfarefpivoted lonithe posts 212 :adjacent the carriers 2l and engage the periphery of the camY the position shown in Fig. 5 the followers llie are moved out or spread apart thus causing the arms lljtolbe spreatdapart and the 'shoes 20 tobe moved in or toward eachfother.

The-'operating means `G for the outlet choke E may oe the same as thatjust described and, as shown in lthe?drawings,"corresponding, parts of means D and E are correspondingly numbered. It is to be observed, however, that the cam operating the means lisA of a.A shape different from that operatingnthe means C with the result that the meansmC and' E aire operatedoppositely.

The lmeans G operating the collapsing means. F may correspondin construction with the operating-means related to means C fand means as shown in 6.of the drawings, and therefore, correspondingpat's are 'numbered the same as in'fthe case of meansCfand 3. Itis to be noted, howver,--that the cam oper-ating" the `collapsing means F is shaped diierently from the other cams so that the shoes or pressure plates 28 of means F operate in the desired manner and in the proper timed relation to the means C and E.

With the operating means G providedV as above described, I prefer to employ a common cam shaft 46 to carry the several cams and the cam shaft is supported in the frame A so that it ro.- tates and thus turns the cams in the desired manner.

'I'he drive means H for the operating means G may be any suitable structure serving to rotate the cam shaft 46, it being preferred, in practice, that the cam shaft be intermittently rotated under the inuence of a suitable control governing the action of means H. The means H shown in the drawings involves a prime mover or motor M operating through a speed reducing mechanism 60 that drives the cam shaft 46.

From the drawings, and particularly from a consideration of Figs. 5, 6 and 7 of the drawings, it will be understood how the mechanism, when in the normal position, as illustrated in Figs. 5, 6 and 7, has the outlet duct closed against the passage of fluid, while the inlet duct is open and the collapsible cell expanded, so that liquid from the container B is free to fill into the cell. When the cam shaft is rotated, as by energization of the motor, the means F remains engaged so that the outlet duct remains closed until such time as the means C has been operated to close the inlet duct I0. Immediately following closing of the inletductvthemeansin operates toopenthesout# I 2.. As the cell is .collapsed` and. throughout the discharge `ofliquid` from'. the cellfandl'outlet duct,

the .inlet ductremainszclosed 01T. When .the cell has be'eniemptied the means 'Freturn-s'to the.

position shown inr :Figi 1 and asit'approaches the unactuatedposition the outlet duct is closed by means E, and the inletid-uct is releasedor opened by meansC 4so that when the mechanism reaches the unactuatedposition therpartsffare re-estaizvlished iin .the relationship shown in Figs.w=5,-6 and 7. Y

By providing the -overtravelsprings d'linlthe mechanisms hereinabovedescribed the clamping action that occurs on the `parts or elements of the liquid .handling uniti can be varied "and `the mechanism can be designed for inexpensive manufacture, in that `great accuracy is not required. Any inaccuracy occurring inxtheA cams `or-nrelatonship of parts can be compensated for so'lon'g as there is suicient movement or travelimparted to the cam followers to gainv full-operationioflthe parts .that engage the liquidi handling unit. vit 'is to be observed that the mechanism `fas provided :by

the present invention is such that the liquid handlin'g unit Icanbe'readily arranged in orremoved from. the machine. This `is an importantffcon-V sideration when the unit is made cheaply :andris to be disposed oiV when fthe container on'which itis vcarrieffzli fhasbeen" emptied and is fdiscarded. It is also to be observed that with the mechanism provided 'by the present inventionthe liquid lhandling uni-t 'is notfdeflected `from `given. position, but rather, remains'vertical yor on the same vertical axis at all times.

Having `described onlya typical .preferredl for-m and application of my invention, I donot'fwish..

to be limited orr restricted to the vspecic fdetails herein set forth, butwishlto reserve to myself any variations ormodifications-that may appear,

to those skilled in the art and Vfall within the scope of the following claims.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A mechanism of the character described including, a liquid handling element having an upper inlet duct, a central collapsible cell receiving liquid from said duct and a lower outlet duct delivering liquid from the cell, control means at the inlet duct and acting on the inlet duct to stop flow therethrough, operating means at the cell and acting on the cell to collapse it, control means at the outlet duct and acting on the outlet duct to stop flow therethrough, and a cam mechanism operating the control means and operating means in synchronism, each of .said means including, opposed oppositely relatively movable operating members with substantially parallel clamp faces engaging said element when said members are in a fully operated position, cam operated arms, yielding force transmitting elements between the arms and said members, and spaced parallel rods Veach pivotally supporting an Voperating member and an arm.

2. A mechanism of the character described including, a liquid handling element having an upper Vinlet duct, a central collapsible cell receiving liquid from said duct and a lower outlet duct delivering liquid from the cell, control means at the inlet duct and acting on the inlet duct to stop flow therethrough, operating means at Vthe cell and acting on the cell to collapse it,rcontrol means at the outlet duct and acting on the outlet duct 7. to stop iiow therethrough, and acam mechanism operating the control meansand operating means. in synchronism, each of said means including, spaced parallel rods, opposed oppositely relatively movable operating members pivotally carried by the rods and engaging said element, a spring between said members normally yielding urging the members apart, cam operated arms pivotally carried by the rods, and yielding elements operated by the arms and engaged with the members to operate said members toward each other.

3. A mechanism of the character described including, a liquid handling element having an upper inlet duct, a central collapsible cell receiving liquid from said duct and a lower outlet duct delivering liquid from the cell, control means at the inlet duct and acting on the inlet duct to stop ow therethrough, operating means at the cell and acting on the cell to collapse it, control means at the outlet duct and acting on the outlet duct to stop flow therethrough, and a cam mechanism operating the control means and operating means in synchronism, each of said meansincluding, spaced parallel rods, opposed relatively movable pivotally mounted operating members carried by the rods and engaging said element, a spring between said members normally yielding urging them apart, pivotally mounted cam operated arms carried by the rods, said means having element engaging faces, and springs between the arms and said members whereby the faces of said members are yielding urged toward each other when the arms are operated.

4. A mechanism of the character described including, a liquid handling element having an inlet duct, an elongate collapsible cell and an outlet duct, the inlet and outlet ducts being substantially smaller in diameter than the cell and being in communication with the cell at the ends thereof, control means at the inlet and outlet ducts controlling ow through the ducts and including relatively movable opposed members engaging opposite sides of the ducts, and operating means'v at the celloperating onthe cell to collapse it and including relatively movable opposed members engaging opposite sides yof the cell, positive drive means having a cam shaft operating the control means and operating means, and yielding elements between the cam shaft and said op-i posed members whereby said members are yield-v ingly operated in opposite directions to succes,

sively close and open the ducts and squeeze and release the cell.

5. A mechanism of the character described in-` cluding, a liquid handling element having an upper inlet duct, a central collapsible cell receiving liquid from said duct and a lower outlet duct delivering liquid from the cell, control means at the inlet and outlet `ducts vcontrolling ow,

through the ducts, Vand operating means at the cell operating on the cell `to collapse it, the said' operating means including relatively movable members having clamp faces engaging opposite sides of the cell and pivotally mounted actuators mounted on spaced parallel axes and cooperativelyl related to the members and operating between the members to actuate them in opposite directions to successively squeeze and release thev cell, said clamp faces being opposed and substan-V tially parallel with each other when fully operated by the actuators to the position where the cell part between them is collapsed against passage of liquid through it. Y

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Germany Apr. 12, 1901

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2817461 *Mar 11, 1953Dec 24, 1957Dairymat CorpLiquid dispensing machine
US2840951 *Feb 25, 1957Jul 1, 1958Green Luther LBalloon powered toy
US2845874 *Nov 2, 1956Aug 5, 1958Nangle James HMetering pump
US2884165 *May 21, 1957Apr 28, 1959Western Electric CoApparatus for dispensing a metered amount of a fluid material
US2900109 *Apr 29, 1957Aug 18, 1959Fibreboard Paper Products CorpMethod for preheating cementitious insulating material
US2907495 *Jan 19, 1956Oct 6, 1959Food EngLiquid dispensing machine
US3152728 *Oct 1, 1962Oct 13, 1964Internat Dispensing CoDrink dispenser with metering syringe and reconstituting nozzles
US3171360 *Mar 9, 1962Mar 2, 1965Melin Walton WilliamPulsation type pumps
US3190229 *Jun 7, 1962Jun 22, 1965Erwin TurowskiMethod and apparatus for conveying liquids
US3433171 *Nov 23, 1966Mar 18, 1969Corneil Ernest RPeristaltic fluid pump
US3515640 *Feb 13, 1968Jun 2, 1970Craig R RudlinCombination pump and oxygenator
US3518033 *Aug 22, 1969Jun 30, 1970Robert M AndersonExtracorporeal heart
US3556352 *Mar 25, 1968Jan 19, 1971Corpus Christi Bank And TrustDispensing hopper with flexible-walled discharge compartment
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US3863686 *Oct 16, 1972Feb 4, 1975V Mark Automation LtdApparatus and process for article filling under reduced pressure
US3999891 *May 23, 1975Dec 28, 1976Joseph GaleaPump using spaced sequential displacements along a flexible tube
US4746279 *May 2, 1986May 24, 1988Doltron AgHose pump
US4781548 *Apr 10, 1987Nov 1, 1988Alderson Richard KInfusion pump system and conduit therefor
US5320503 *Sep 23, 1993Jun 14, 1994Patient Solutions Inc.Infusion device with disposable elements
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US5660529 *Dec 6, 1994Aug 26, 1997Mcgaw, Inc.Linear peristaltic pump with reshaping fingers interdigitated with pumping elements
US5803712 *Feb 14, 1995Sep 8, 1998Patient Solutions, Inc.Method of measuring an occlusion in an infusion device with disposable elements
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EP0053437A1 *Oct 29, 1981Jun 9, 1982Novacor Medical CorporationPump and actuator mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/474, 222/214
International ClassificationG01F11/02, F04B43/00, F04B43/08, G01F11/08
Cooperative ClassificationF04B43/082, G01F11/088
European ClassificationF04B43/08B, G01F11/08F