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Publication numberUS2689631 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1954
Filing dateApr 21, 1953
Priority dateApr 21, 1953
Publication numberUS 2689631 A, US 2689631A, US-A-2689631, US2689631 A, US2689631A
InventorsMarks Saul H
Original AssigneePhoenix Closet Accessories Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible luggage
US 2689631 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 21, 1954 s. H. MARKS ,6

' GQLLAPSIBLE LUGGAGE "Filed April 21. 1953 2 Sheets-=Sheet 1 INVENT-OR.

BY JTI'O NE? p s. H. MARKS 2,689,631

COLLAPSIBLE LUGGAGE Filed April 21, 1953 I '2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORL 54w: 14 MAW;

- JTTOQR 1" Patented Sept. 21, 1954 COLLAPSIBLE LUGGAGE Saul H. Marks, Brooklyn, N. Y., assignor to Phoenix Closet Accessories, Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey Application April 21, 1953, Serial No. 350,047

8 Claims. 1

This invention relates to collapsible luggage of the type and kind where garments can be hung in a long wardrobe type of container, and then folded substantially centrally to bring end portions in close proximity to each other in forming a relatively small rectangular piece of luggage which can be conveniently carried about. More particularly, the invention deals with luggage of the kind under consideration wherein means is provided to retain the end portions of the luggage in collapsed relationship when carried as a small piece of luggage.

Still more particularly, the invention deals with the provision of reinforcing and support-- ing rods for supporting the folded luggage in upright position on a support in the manner of a normal bag or case, said means being normally collapsible within boundaries of the luggage when not in use.

The novel features of the invention will be best understood from the following description when taken together with the accompanying drawing, in which certain embodiments of the invention are disclosed, and in which the separate parts are designated by suitable reference characters in each of the views, and in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a flexible and collapsible luggage shown in its extended wardrobe position;

Fig. 2 is a rear view of the luggage as seen in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is an end view of the luggage in collapsed position showing one of the supporting rods in operative position;

Fig. 6 is a side view of the structure as seen in Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a bottom plan view of the structure as seen in Fig. 5;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged sectional view substantially on the line 8-8 of Fig. 1, showing the upper portion of the luggage in position for hanging; and

Fig. 9 is a bottom detailed view of the top supporting frame construction which I employ, with parts of the construction broken away.

In practice, I provide a flexible and collapsible luggage defined generally by elongated outer and inner walls 10 and II, the term outer and inner being appropriate in considering collapsed luggage when assuming the case environment, as seen in Figs. 5, 6 and '7 of the drawing. The flexible luggage also includes a top wall I2, bottom wall l3 and side walls M, the top,bottom and side walls being suitably stitched to peripheral edges of the front and back walls, and these junctures may be reinforced in any suitable way as with other luggage of this type and kind.

Stitched to the front wall I0 are two pocketforming sheets I 5 and I6, note Fig. 2, having one open edge, this open edge being closed by a separable fastener closure as at I! and [8 respectively. In Fig. 8 of the drawing, I have shown in part a sectional view through the sheet [5 to clearly illustrate the formation of one of the pockets. These pockets can be utilized for the support of accessory garments in addition to the hanging of garments within the main body portion of the luggage.

The rear wall II has a large L-shaped opening, as clearly noted in Fig. 1 of the drawing, which opening is closed by a long separable fastener l9, suitable pull tabs 20 and 2| being employed at ends of the opening to facilitate operation of the fastener. This construction gives access to the interior of the luggage for the insertion of garments into the luggage and removal of the same therefrom. Thus, the opening is arranged adjacent one side wall and the top wall l2 as clearly indicated.

Centrally of the rear Wall II and arranged upon the inner surface thereof is a reinforcing and fold strip 22 arranged in a protective fabric casing 23. The strip 22 terminates short of the opening controlled by the fastener l9, as clearly shown. The strip 22 facilitates folding of garments in movement of the luggage from the position shown in Fig. 1 to the position shown for example in Fig. 5, and this strip eliminates creasing where the garments are folded. Pivoted to end portions of the strip 22, as at 24, are two supporting rods or legs 25 which are normally held in collapsed position longitudinally of the strip 22 by a center strap 26 held in position by a snap fastener device 21. However, these supporting rods or legs can be extended into operative position, as indicated in Figs. 5 and 7 of the drawing, so as to provide a rigid support for the luggage, maintaining a position substantially similar to that diagrammatically shown in Fig. 5 of the drawing. In other words, luggage of the kind under consideration, when in position shown in Fig. 5, would normally have the outer sides defined by the wall I0 bulge laterally with the top part of the resulting luggage case in much closer relationship to the bottom thereof than to the relationship shown. Actually when garments are in the luggage, there would be a slight rounding of the wall [0, but the spac- 3 ing between the top and bottom of the luggage would be maintained.

Supported within the top wall I2 is a hanger frame unit, which is shown in detached detail in Fig. 9 of the drawing and in part in section in Fig. 8 of the drawing. The unit comprises an oblong rectangular wire frame 29 which defines the peripheral edges of the top wall it of the resulting luggage. Secured centrally of the side members 30 of the frame 29 is a transverse plate 31, having pairs of curled edge portions 32 which envelop the side members 35, the side members 30 having downwardly and inwardly offset loops 33 centrally thereof and between the spaced curled edge portions. This construction centralizes the plate 3! on the frame and also provides means for coupling a U-shaped garment hanger rod 34; with the frame.

The hanger rod 34 has looped ends 35 engaging the loops 33, as clearly illustrated in Fig. 9 of the drawing. The crosshead of the rod 35 is preferably corrugated, as seen at 36, to give rigidity thereto and also to provide spacing of hangers thereon. Hingedly supported on the rod 34 at 3'? is a hanger retaining strap 35 having a spring catch end 39 to frictionally engage the hanger 34, as will be apparent. By swinging the strap 38 outwardly, the garment hangers can be readily detached from the rod 34.

The plate 3| is preferably reinforced by a plurality of transverse ribs or beads M], as noted in Fig. 9 of the drawing. Centrally of the plate 3i is an aperture 4i adapted to receive a loop at with which a hanger hook 33 is coupled, as clearly seen in Fig. 8 of the drawing. The loop 82 is free to rotate in the aperture ii so that the hook can be swung into position shown in Fig. 8, and also moved into the position shown in Figs. 1 and 7, in which latter position a strap 44 similar to the strap 21 will engage the hook to hold the same in a definite position on the wall I2.

End portions of the plate 31 are also apertured to receive other handle supporting loops 45 with which a handle member 46 is coupled. The bottom wall is of the luggage has a strap 41 similar to the strap 21 to engage the handle member 46 to support the same in defined position on the bottom of the luggage when the luggage is in the position shown in Figs. 5, 6 and '7 of the drawing.

The front wall It has substantially centrally thereof an elongated rectangular reinforcing strip 5 secured thereto and covered by a facing sheet 459, note Fig. 4 of the drawing. Secured to this strip at spaced intervals centrally thereof are metal straps 55 for support of another handle member 5|, the straps 58 having center pins 52 which operate in elongated slots 53 of the handle, note Fig. 2, so that the handle can be retained in a flat position on the wall II), as indicated in Fig. 2, and also extended for use as indicated in Figs. 5 and. 6. Also secured centrally of the bag inwardly of the wall I0 is a transverse strap, indicated in dotted lines at 54 in Fig. 2 of the drawing, the strap having buckle means as at 55, and this strap is adapted to engage the central portion of garments hung within the luggage to hold them in firm position preparatory to folding the luggage into the position shown in Figs. 5, 6 and 7 of the drawing.

In the use of the luggage, the same can be laid upon a surface or support with the wall it arranged downwardly, the garments can be laid in the luggage after attachment of hangers therewith, the hangers being coupled with the hanger rod 34 as will be apparent. After the main compartment of the luggage has been packed with the garments, the fastener is can be closed, then the strap can be opened to release the rods 25 and the rods swung into position perpendicularly to the strip 22, whereupon the luggage can be folded into the position shown in Figs. 5, 6 and 7, and the luggage placed on the floor or other support, the luggage being maintained substantially in the position shown in Fig. 5, which position will be governed largely by the thickness of the garments which would be disposed between the strip 22 and the strip 55. The two pockets formed by the facings i5 and It can be filled with the other luggage pieces prior to, or after, the luggage has been brought into the position shown in Fig. 5. When in this position, the luggage will be much the same as an ordinary suitcase having flexible side walls, the only difierence being that the degree of flexibility of the side walls might be enlarged upon with this luggage, particularly from the standpoint that the transverse dimensions of the top portion of the luggage are materially less than that of the lower portion of the luggage. The handle member 5| forms means for carrying the luggage when in collapsed position.

In this connection, it will be understood that the lower wall I3 of the luggage has a stiffening and reinforcing strip 55 which will be faced on the inner surface of the luggage by a facing 5'5, as noted in part in Fig. 2 of the drawing, the strip 56 being generally similar to the strip 48 to which the handle 5i is coupled. It will thus be apparent that the strip 55 together with the frame 29 will provide a relatively large rectangular base to the luggage, as shown in Fig. 5, and bulging of the Walls it will most likely take place at the upper portions of the luggage, as seen in Fig. 5.

It will be understood that the entire luggage or casing, except for the reinforcing strips and hanger frame, is entirely flexible so that the luggage can be compactly folded for packaging, storage, and the like, into a relatively thin package of a length and width defined substantially by the reinforcements employed. The handle membar on the top wall can be utilized in carrying the luggage with the luggage fully opened, as shown in Fig. 1 of the drawing, particularly in conveying luggage of this type from a home to a motor car in which the luggage can be hung. On the other hand, in general transportation of the luggage, it is collapsed or folded into the position shown in Fig. 5, and while in such position it is practical to maintain the bracing and supporting means, such as the leg members in operative position so that the luggage can be placed on a supporting surface at any time with assurance that the luggage will maintain its more or less upright position. It will be understood that in the upright position of the luggage in the folded position of the luggage, the garments themselves aid in giving stability to the luggage, particularly in maintaining the top and bottom walls in relationship to each other. This latter being further aided by the coupling of said walls one with the other through the coupling means employed, namely the coupling of the handle member 45 with the strip 4i.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In flexible walled luggage, an elongated rectangular casing defined by inner and outer walls and top, bottom and side walls, an oblong rectangular wire hanger frame supported within the top wall, said frame including a garment hanger rod centrally of the frame and transversing said top wall, the inner wall of the luggage having a long L-shaped closure controlled by a separable fastener, said closure freeing said wall to give access to the interior of the luggage for arrangement of garments on said hanger rod, the central portion of the luggage having a wide reinforcing strip fixed to the outer wall and a narrow reinforcing strip fixed to the inner wall, said hanger frame having a central reinforcing plate, means coupled with said plate and extending through the top Wall for supporting a handle member externally of the top wall, and the wide strip fixed to the outer wall having a handle member secured thereto, said last named handle member being utilized as carrying means for the luggage in collapsed position of the latter with the top and bottom walls disposed at the lower part of the collapsed luggage.

2. In flexible walled luggage, an elongated rectangular casing defined by inner and outer walls and top, bottom and side walls, an oblong rectangular wire hanger frame supported within the top wall, said frame including a garment hanger rod centrally of the frame and transversing said top wall, the inner wall of the luggage having a long L-shaped closure controlled by a separable fastener, said closure freeing said wall to give access to the interior of the luggage for arrangement of garments on said hanger rod, the central portion of the luggage having a wide reinforcing strip fixed to the outer wall and a narrow reinforcing strip fixed to the inner wall, said hanger frame having a central reinforcing plate, means coupled with said plate and extending through the top Wall for supporting a handle member externally of the top wall, and the wide strip fixed to the outer wall having a handle member secured thereto, said last named handle member being utilized as carrying means for the luggage in collapsed position of the latter with the top and bottom walls disposed at the lower part of the collapsed luggage, and means on the bottom wall engaging the handle member of said top wall to maintain said top and bottom walls against relative movement.

3. In flexible walled luggage, an elongated rectangular casing defined by inner and outer walls and top, bottom and side walls, an oblong rectangular wire hanger frame supported within the top wall, said frame including a garment hanger rod centrally of the frame and transversing said top wall, the inner wall of the luggage having a long L-shaped closure controlled by a separable fastener, said closure freeing said wall to give access to the interior of the luggage for arrangement of garments on said hanger rod, the central portion of the luggage having a wide reinforcing strip fixed to the outer wall and a narrow reinforcing strip fixed to the inner wall, said hanger frame having a central reinforcing plate, means coupled with said plate and extending through the top Wall for supporting a handle member externally of the top wall, and the wide strip fixed to the outer wall having a handle member secured thereto, said last named handle member being utilized as carrying means for the luggage in collapsed position of the latter with the top and bottom walls disposed at the lower part of the collapsed luggage, means on the bot tom wall engaging the handle member of said top wall to maintain said top and bottom walls against relative movement, and a pair of leg members pivotally supported to said narrow strip and adapted to extend downwardly at the sides of the luggage when in collapsed position for support of the luggage against collapsing between the wide strip and said top and bottom walls.

l. In collapsible flexible luggage of the character described, comprising an oblong rectangular casing defined by inner and outer walls bordered by narrow side and top and bottom walls, the top and bottom walls having reinforcing means maintaining said walls in firm substantially rectangular position, the front wall having centrally thereof a reinforcing strip extending the full width thereof, said strip forming the top of the luggage when in collapsed position, the top and bottom walls forming collectively the bottom of the collapsed luggage, means for maintaining the reinforcing means of said walls in edge to edge relationship in the collapsed position of the luggage, and bracing means secured to said luggage and extending from a point substantially in alignment with the bottom of the collapsed luggage to the upper portion of the luggage for supporting the upper portion of the luggage in spaced relation to the bottom.

5. In collapsible flexible luggage of the character described, comprising an oblong rectangular casing defined by inner and outer walls bordered by narrow side and top and bottom Walls, the top and bottom walls having reinforcing means maintaining said walls in firm substantially rectangular position, the front wall for maintaining the reinforcing means of said walls in edge to edge relationship in the collapsed position of the luggage, bracing means extending from a point substantially in alignment with the bottom of the collapsed luggage to the upper portion of the luggage for supporting the upper portion of the luggage in spaced relation to the bottom, and said last named means comprising a pair of rods plvotally supported to the luggage and normally collapsed along the inner wall of the luggage.

6. In collapsible flexible luggage of the character described, comprising an oblong rectangular casing defined by inner and outer walls bordered by narrow side and top and bottom walls, the top and bottom walls having reinforcing means maintaining said walls in firm substantially rectangular position, the front wall having centrally thereof a reinforcing strip ex tending the full width thereof, said strip forming the top of the luggage when in collapsed position, the top and bottom walls forming collectively the bottom of the collapsed luggage, means for maintaining the reinforcing means of said walls in edge to edge relationship in the collapsed position of the luggage, bracing means extending from a point substantially in alignment with the bottom of the collapsed luggage to the upper portion of the luggage for supporting the upper portion of the luggage in spaced relation to the bottom, said last named means comprising a pair of rods pivotally supported to the luggage and normally collapsed along the inner wall of the luggage, and means transversing the luggage for bracing said inner wall in support thereof by said bracing means.

7. In collapsible flexible luggage of the character described, comprising an oblong rectangular casing defined by inner and outer walls bordered by narrow side and top and bottom walls, the top and bottom walls having reinforcing means maintaining said walls in firm substantially rectangular position, the front wall having centrally thereof a reinforcing strip extending the full width thereof, said strip forming the top of the luggage when in collapsed position, the top and bottom walls forming collectively the bottom of the collapsed luggage, means for maintaining the reinforcing means of said walls in edge to edge relationship in the collapsed position of the luggage, bracing means extending from a point substantially in alignment with the bottom of the collapsed luggage to the upper portion of the luggage for supporting the upper portion of the luggage in spaced relation to the bottom, said last named means comprising a pair of rods pivotally supported to the luggage and normally collapsed along the inner wall of the luggage, means transversing the luggage for bracing said inner wall in support thereof by said bracing means, and the reinforcing means of said top wall including an outwardly extending handle member secured to said reinforcing strip.

in maintaining the top Wall in predetermined spaced relationship to said bottom walls.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,394,007 Hall Oct. 18, 1921 1,895,208 Salavsky Jan. 24, 1933 1,927,165 Freedman Sept. 19, 1933 1,980,714 Brady Nov. 13, 1934 2,002,638 Lee et al. May 28, 1935 2,154,630 Marbury et al Apr. 18, 1939 2,596,412 Kish et a1. May 13, 1952 2,606,636 Braverman Aug. 12, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1394007 *Jan 3, 1921Oct 18, 1921Lucy Hall MaryCollapsible wardrobe
US1895208 *Jun 24, 1931Jan 24, 1933Keva SalavskyGarment carrying container for use with closed vehicles
US1927165 *May 13, 1930Sep 19, 1933Ruth FreedmanWardrobe bag
US1980714 *Dec 5, 1928Nov 13, 1934Bradka Holding CorpTraveling bag
US2002638 *Aug 9, 1934May 28, 1935Kaufmann & Co Inc KTraveling bag
US2154630 *Mar 6, 1937Apr 18, 1939Fulton Bag And Cotton MillsConvertible wardrobe handbag
US2596412 *Sep 28, 1948May 13, 1952Atlantic Prod CorpWardrobe type foldable luggage bag
US2606636 *Jul 24, 1951Aug 12, 1952Braverman Irving LGarment bag
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2718943 *Nov 3, 1954Sep 27, 1955Braverman Irving LCollapsible traveling bags
US2740506 *Sep 18, 1953Apr 3, 1956Crescent Products CoFlexible travel bag with stiffening means
US2774450 *Feb 15, 1954Dec 18, 1956Smallberg Harry RFoldable, limp-walled article of luggage
US3273678 *Sep 3, 1963Sep 20, 1966 Foldable luggage bag
US3289985 *Apr 1, 1966Dec 6, 1966Crest Lock CoExternal hanger for garment carrying bag
US3958675 *Apr 22, 1974May 25, 1976Rosenblum Julia RGarment carrier
US4262780 *Dec 5, 1979Apr 21, 1981Samuelian Richard WFixture for converting luggage for articulated movement
US4342479 *Dec 17, 1980Aug 3, 1982Wolfgang HoferHanging implement for garment bags
US4538709 *Jul 11, 1983Sep 3, 1985The Huntington National BankWheeled garment bag
US4613039 *Mar 11, 1985Sep 23, 1986D. Klein & Son, Inc.Drop bottom garment bag
US4732270 *Dec 22, 1986Mar 22, 1988Andiamo, Inc.Garment bag hanger support
US4736854 *Jul 30, 1987Apr 12, 1988Samsonite CorporationGarment receptacle clothes hanger support
US4850562 *Mar 3, 1988Jul 25, 1989Lenox IncorporatedHanger-retaining clamp for garment bags
US4852845 *Mar 3, 1988Aug 1, 1989Lenox IncorporatedHanger clamp with inclined frame
US4887700 *Jul 25, 1988Dec 19, 1989Rice Allen CLuggage to carry suits/dresses
US4927014 *Jun 26, 1989May 22, 1990American Tourister, Inc.Garment bag with flap cover for strap hook
US5352006 *Nov 25, 1992Oct 4, 1994Morton OcuinHanging assembly for folding garment bags
US5400900 *Feb 26, 1993Mar 28, 1995Andiamo, Inc.Clothes hanger support, garment bag having such a support, and method of making same
US6439526Apr 20, 1999Aug 27, 2002Clemco Products, Inc.Jointed clamp for garment bag
WO2013072405A1Nov 15, 2012May 23, 2013Samsonite Ip Holdings S. A R. L.Luggage frame structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification190/18.00R, 206/287.1
International ClassificationA45C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45C3/004
European ClassificationA45C3/00D