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Publication numberUS2689678 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1954
Filing dateNov 9, 1950
Priority dateNov 9, 1950
Publication numberUS 2689678 A, US 2689678A, US-A-2689678, US2689678 A, US2689678A
InventorsWendt Donovan D
Original AssigneeBemis Bro Bag Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag
US 2689678 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 21, 1954 D. D. WEN T 2,689,678

BAG

Filed Nov. 9, 1950 Snventor attorneys Patented Sept. 21, 1954 BAG Donovan D. Wendt, Minneapolis, Minn., assignor to Bemis Bro. Bag

corporation of Missouri Application November 9, 1950, Serial No. 194,809

2 Claims.

My invention relates to a novel self-ventilating bag formed from imperforate tubular material and to the method of forming same.

The primary object of my invention is the provision of a conventional bag formed from imperforate tubular material and which is intended for the holding of commodities in chunk form, which automatically becomes self-ventilating when the chunk contents are placed therein.

A further object of my invention is the provision of a self-ventilating bag which has no material removed therefrom and is, therefore, not weakened with respect to stresses exerted on the bag longitudinally thereof.

A still further object of my invention is the provision of a bag for chunk style contents in which the ventilating means will not be closed in part by said contents.

A still further and highly important object of my invention is the provision of a bag having a plurality of laterally-spaced longitudinally-extended slits adjacent the upper and lower end portions thereof-which slits will automatically open under the stress exerted on the walls of the bag when the chunk contents are inserted therein and which will permit ventilation or passage of air completely through the bag even when the bags are piled one upon the other in horizontal (side-by-side) relationship.

A still further object of my invention is the provision of an elongated tubular bag of the class described, which is formed from imperforate thermoplastic material and which is provided only adjacent its opposite ends with circumferentially-extended rows of laterally-spaced ventilating slits-useful and necessary to the merchandiser of chunk-style goods such as oranges, apples, potatoes, and the like-but which ventilating slits may be cut off by the purchaser whereby to produce an imperforate tubular element which may be resealed by said user at one or both ends to provide a utility bag for packing food commodities in refrigerators, freezers, and the like.

A still further object of my invention is the provision of a novel method of providing a selfventilating bag from imperforate thermoplastic material, namely, by the use of cutting knives which have been heated to a sufficient temperature to cause heading of the edges of the slits so as to tend to check the tendency of the material to slit further.

The above and still further objects and advantages of my invention will become apparent from the following detailed specification, appended claims, and attached drawings.

Minneapolis, Minn., a

Referring to the drawings, wherein like characters indicate like parts throughout the several views:

Fig. 1 is a view in side elevation of a bag constructed in accordance with my invention;

Fig. 2 is a view corresponding to Fig. l but illustrating the bag with chunk-type contents therein;

Fig. 3 is a view in transverse section, taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view, illustrating a step in the method of producing my novel bag;

Fig. 5 is a view in section taken substantially on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4; and

Fig. 6 is a view in perspective, illustrating my self-ventilating bag structure when a plurality of same, with contents therein, are stacked one upon the other.

Referring with greater particularity to the drawings, the numeral I indicates, in its entirety, an elongated tubular bag, as shown, formed from a single sheet of flexible imperforate material folded upon itself to provide a closed bottom 2, a front wall 3, and a rear wall 4. The front and rear walls are secured together at their side edges, as indicated at 5. The bag I, prior to placing contents therein, is open at its top portion 6.

In order to assure ventilation to chunk-type contents within the bag I, such as oranges, apples, potatoes, and the like, I provide the imperforate front and rear walls 3 and 4 thereof with a plurality of laterally-spaced generally longitudinally-extending slits 1 intermediate the top 6 and the bottom 2 and preferably in spaced relation to each thereof. In fact, I have found that it is preferable to arrange the slits 1 in circumferentially-spaced rows 8, one adjacent the upper end portion 6 and one adjacent the lower end portion 2. As shown in Fig. 2, these slits 1 will open up when chunk-type contents such as oranges A are placed therein. This is due to the uneven stress or pressures exerted upon the walls 3 and 4 of the bag I by the oranges A. It should be obvious that when the slits l are in the open condition of Fig. 2, air is permitted to pass completely through the tubular and imperforate bag I, thus preventing spoilage of the contents. Furthermore, in view of the fact that the rows 8 of slits 1 are spaced one adjacent the bottom 2 and one adjacent the top 6 (which, of course, is closed in one manner or another after the contents A are placed therein), passage of air through the bag I through the slits 1 will not be curtailed or restricted, even when the bags I,

with contents therein, are stacked in a conven-.

3 tional manner, that is, in horizontal side-by-side relationship, one upon the other as shown in Fig. 6.

One inherent advantage of providing the bag I with slits 1, as distinguished from cutting out ventilating apertures from the walls 3 and 4 thereof, is that the tensile strength of the walls 3 and 4 is not weakened with respect to stresses exerted longitudinally of the bag.

Other advantages derived from placing the circumferentially-extended rows of generally vertically-extended slits adjacent one or both ends of the bag are numerous. For instance, when so positioned, a relatively wide band at the central portion of the bag remains unobstructed for printed and other advertising material as well as increased visibility. The'advantage of this arrangement is that it allows draw cords to' be run through either or both of the circumferentially-extended rows of slits to form a closure for either, or both ends of the bag, either for original or reuse purposes.

My invention is particularly adaptable to bags formed from imperforate thermoplastic material such as polyethylene. When material of this type is utilized, I preferably out the slits I with a cutting knife 9 (see Fig. 4) which has been preheated to a temperature sufiicient tomelt the thermoplastic material immediately adjacent the blade It) so as to cause the material to shrink or roll back slightly. so, a to cause a bead II to be, formed about the slits I. These beads or. reinforced edges I I obviously tend to prevent further slitting of the material such as may be caused by lifting the bag I, with contents therein, from either side edge l2.

My invention has been thoroughly tested and found to be completely satisfactory, for the accomplishment of the above objects; and, while I have disclosed a preferred embodiment of my invention, it is obvious that the same is capable of modification without departure from the spirit and scope of the invention as. defined by the appended claims.

What I claim is: I v

l. A tubular bag of thermoplastic material in cluding opposed normally flat rectangular side Walls, a row of ventilating slits in at least one of said walls, said row of slits being disposed adjacent an end of the bag transversely of said side walls, and said slits being transversely spaced and extending longitudinally of the side walls in parallel relation to each other, the edges of said slits defined by reinforcing beads and being substantially in contact in the normal flattened condition of the bag and the slits opening upon distension of the side Walls under fill of the bag.

"in tubular bag of thermopalstic material including opposed normally flat rectangular side walls, a row of ventilating slits in each side Wall adjacent each end of the bag, the rows of slits extending transversely of the side walls and the rows of slits in one side wall being substantially opposite the rows of slits in the other side wall, theslits" being transversely. spaced and extending longitudinally of the side walls in parallel relasome each other, the edges of said slits defined by reinforcing beads and being substantially in contact'in the normal flattened condition of the bag and the slits openingupon distension of the side walls under i lll of the bag.

References Cited in the file of this patent

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1918793 *May 18, 1932Jul 18, 1933Baker Ralph BLaundry bag
US1926066 *Feb 17, 1932Sep 12, 1933Int Paper CoWindow bag
US2085509 *May 31, 1935Jun 29, 1937Adolf RamboldBag
US2225089 *Jul 22, 1936Dec 17, 1940Howard L FischerLaundry bag
US2293178 *Jan 9, 1942Aug 18, 1942Cameron Machine CoArt of severing thermoplastic webs
US2365902 *Jul 12, 1941Dec 26, 1944Powers Milton AMethod of fabricating porous products
US2488212 *Oct 18, 1945Nov 15, 1949Visking CorpMethod of sealing thermoplastic material
AT111635B * Title not available
GB524535A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2892297 *Feb 28, 1956Jun 30, 1959Derrah Helen JBags and bag handling machines
US2900258 *Jan 17, 1956Aug 18, 1959Wagner James RPackaged effervescent concentrates and process therefor
US2987240 *Jun 8, 1959Jun 6, 1961Du PontFilm
US3040966 *Sep 28, 1959Jun 26, 1962Allied Plastics CompanyArticle packaging sleeve
US3040968 *Apr 28, 1959Jun 26, 1962Allied Plastics CompanyWrapper for packaged produce
US3069303 *Feb 5, 1960Dec 18, 1962Scholle Chemical CorpProcess and apparatus for producing flexible containers
US3109579 *Feb 14, 1961Nov 5, 1963Allied Plastics CompanySlit wrapper for use in packaging produce in baskets
US3123279 *May 21, 1962Mar 3, 1964 Plastic bag
US3150573 *Jan 11, 1962Sep 29, 1964Continental Can CoBag making method
US3495764 *Apr 17, 1968Feb 17, 1970Allied Plastics CoSlit bag for produce and the like
US3507443 *Jul 1, 1968Apr 21, 1970Jiffy Mfg CoVentilated multi-ply bag
US4712672 *Jun 6, 1986Dec 15, 1987Roy George NHay bale cover
US4834554 *Nov 16, 1987May 30, 1989J. C. Brock Corp.Plastic bag with integral venting structure
US4886372 *Feb 18, 1988Dec 12, 1989Michael GreengrassControlled ripening of produce and fruits
US5226735 *Aug 27, 1992Jul 13, 1993Daniel BeliveauPerforated plastic bag for packaging fruits or vegetables
US6811529 *Mar 10, 2000Nov 2, 2004Illinois Tool Works Inc.Perpendicular perforation on zipper tape for air evacuation of package
US7163339Apr 16, 2001Jan 16, 2007Plaspack U.S.A., Inc.Composite breathable produce bag with a reinforced mesh sidewall
US7640715Sep 19, 2006Jan 5, 2010Plaspack Usa, Inc.Multi-material vertical form, fill and seal bag forming method
US7837388May 9, 2003Nov 23, 2010Plaspack Usa, Inc.Multi-material vertical form, fill and seal bag
US8550717Sep 2, 2010Oct 8, 2013Plaspack U.S.A., Inc.Composite breathable produce bag with a reinforced mesh sidewall
US20110158562 *Mar 25, 2010Jun 30, 2011Emballage Rouville Inc.Deflatable bag with laterally perforated liner and non-adjacent humidity barrier
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/103, 383/76, 426/410, 383/119
International ClassificationB65D33/01
Cooperative ClassificationB65D33/01
European ClassificationB65D33/01