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Publication numberUS2690121 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 28, 1954
Filing dateFeb 24, 1949
Priority dateFeb 24, 1949
Publication numberUS 2690121 A, US 2690121A, US-A-2690121, US2690121 A, US2690121A
InventorsAuerbacher George N, Caulfield Joseph R
Original AssigneeChamplain Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary printing press with interchangeable printing cylinder
US 2690121 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 28, 1954 G. N. AUERBACHER ET AL 2,690,121

ROTARY PRINTING PRESS WITH TNTERCHANGEABLE PRINTING CYLINDER 3 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Feb. 24, 1949 Sept 28 1954 G. N. AUERBACHER ETAL 2,690,121

ROTARY PRINTING PRESS wITH INTERCHANGEABLE PRINTING CYLINDER 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 24, 1949 sept. 2s, 1954 G. N. AUERBACHER ET AL 2,690,121 ROTARY PRINTING PRESS WITH INTERCHANGEABLE PRINTING CYLINDER Filed Feb. 24, 1949 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Patented Sept. 28, 1954 ROTARY PRINTING PRESS WITH INTER- CHANGEABLE PRINTING CYLINDER George N. Auerbacher, South Orange, and Joseph R. Caulfield, West Norwood, N. J., assignors to 'Champlain Company, lne., Bloomfield, N. J., a corporation of New York Application February 24, 1949, Serial No. 78,044

This invention relates to printing presses, and more particularly, though not necessarily, to a rubber plate printing press.

The primary object of the present invention is to generally improve printing presses. A more particular object is to provide a quick throwoff so arranged as to release the printing' cylinder simultaneously from both the impression roll and the inking mechanism. Another object of the invention is to make it possible to change the diameter of the printing cylinder without necessitating a corresponding change in diameter for either the impression roll or the ink roll. In accordance with a feature and object of the present invention, the printing lcylinder is mounted on normally fixed bearings', and the change in diameter of the printing cylinder is accommodated by a movement in approximately radial direction of both the impression roll and the inking mechanism. A further object of the invention is to so arrange the gearing for driving the impression roll and the ink roll as to accommodate the aforesaid movement of the rolls incident to a change in diameter of the printing cylinder.

Further objects are to facilitate rapid change of the printing cylinder; to make possible the use of any desired diameter of printing `cylinder (within the minimum and maximum limits of the machine), independently of particular increments determined by gear teeth size or like factors; and to make it possible for the mechanism which moves the rolls for a change in printing cylinder size to be used also to adjust the printing pressure and the ink transfer pressure.

Further objects concern the application of the invention to multiple unit printing presses. One object is to make it possible to employ a single variable gear transmission or variable speed transmission to change the speed ratio between the rollers and the printing cylinder in all of the printing units. Another object is to provide quick release or throw-01T simultaneously for all of the units. Still another object is to make it possible, by the inexpensive addition of one very small motor and overrunning clutch, to rotate the inking mechanisms of all of the units when the press is temporarily shut down.

To accomplish the foregoing objects, and other more specific objects which will hereinafter appear, our invention resides in the printing press elements and their relation one to another as are more particularly described in the following specification. The specification is accompanied by drawings in which:

22 Claims. (Cl. lOl- 181) Fig. l is a partially sectioned schematic elevation of a printing unit embodying features of our invention;

Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the rollers appropriately moved to accommodate a larger printing cylinder;

Fig. 3 is a schematic side elevation of a multiple unit printing press embodying features of the invention;

Fig. 4 is a plan View of the same;

Fig. 5 is a partially sectioned transverse elevation explanatory of the throw-off mechanism;

Figs. 6 and "I are explanatory of the drive mechanism for the printing cylinder;

Fig. 8 schematically illustrates a multiple throw-off mechanism;

Fig. 9 is a side elevation schematically illustrating the addition of a drier, and variations in inking mechanism; and

Figs. 10 through 17 are schematic diagrams explanatory of the invention.

Referring to the drawing, and more particularly to Fig, 1, the printing unit there shown comprises a printing cylinder I2, an impression roll I4, and inking mechanism including an ink roll I6 which is normally in Contact with the printing cylinder I2. The impression roll I4 is disposed Ibelow the printing cylinder I2 to receive a horizontal web 20 therebetween. The ink mechanism is sidewardly offset from the printing cylinder I2. The printing unit further comprises throw-off means to move the cylinder l2 a short distance in a diagonal direction, as indicated by the broken line position I2. F01` thisl purpose the printing cylinder bearings 22 are carried in slides 24 which slope in the desired direction. The direction is such that the throw-off movement disengages the printing cylinder I2 simultaneously from the impression roll I4 and the ink roll I6.

The specific throw-olf mechanism here shown comprises a shaft 2t extending across the press unit and carrying spaced eccentrios 28 which operate eccentric rods 30 connected to the bearings 22. Fig. 5 shows how spaced eccentrics 28 and connecting rods 30 are connected by shaft 2S. The shaft 26 is operated by means of suitable handle 32. The handle may be provided with a reciproca-ble spring-pressed lock pin 34 cooperating with mating holes to lock the printing cylinder in either released or printing position.

Referring now to Figs. 1 and 2, the impression roll I4 and its bearings 35 are carried in vertical slides 38. The ends of the inking mechanism, generally designated 40, are carried on spaced horizontal slides i2 .at the sides of the press. Appropriate adjusting means are provided for moving the impression roll and the inking mechanism along their respective slides, thereby accommodating a change in the size of the printing cylinder. This is illustrated by the change from the small diameter cylinder l2 shown in Fig. l to the large diameter cylinder H2 shown in Fig. 2. The printing cylinder bearings 22 retain their normally fixed center, and the change in diameter has been accommodated without changing the location of that center. The throw-off mechanism functions as before, and changes the location of the printing cylinder from the solid line position H2 to the dotted line position H2', thus releasing the printing cylinder simultaneously from both the impression roll Hl` and the ink roll I6.

The mechanism for moving the impression roll bearings may be varied, but in the form here shown comprises a crank or hand wheel 4d turning a shaft ce carrying spaced worms A8 meshing with worm gears 5t secured to the lower ends of screws 52 threadedly received by the bearings 36. It will be understood that the worm, worm gears and screws are disposed on opposite sides f the press to insure simultaneous and equal movement of both ends of the impression roll. If desired, some relative or independent adjustment may be provided in addition, to equalize the printing pressure when needed.

The mechanism for adjusting the inking mechanism may be of similar character, it comprising a hand wheel il turning a shaft 56 carrying a pair of spaced worms 53 meshing with worm gears El@ mounted on screws 62 threadedly received in spaced shoes at the sides of the inking mechanism.

The impression roll and the inking mechanism are preferably geared together, and are preferabh,7 driven by gearing so .arranged as to accommodate the substantial movement already described. For this purpose the impression roll Hl is driven by a helical gear 6A of unusually great length, disposed with its axis in the dir-ection of movement of the bearings St. The helical gear B meshes with .a helical gear SS carried on the shaft 68 of the impression roll. It will be noted that in Fig. l the helical gear 66 is disposed near the upper end of the long helical gear fili, whereas in Fig. 2 it is disposed near the lower end. The long helical gear is restrained against axial movement, and remains in mesh with gear t during any change in position of the impression roll incident to a change in diameter of the printing cylinder. It will be understood that the long gear 64 need not be a helical gear as used in most modern sense, an obvious variant being a long worm at (it, meshing with a worm gear at 66, this being a special case of helical gearing. I-Iowever, We believe the use of a multiple thread Worm of large pitch, or, in other words, a helical gear in modern usage, to be preferable in order that the gearing be reversible, and also being there is no need for a marked reduction gear ratio such as would be produced by an ordinary single thread worm.

The drive for the inking mechanism is similar in that it employs a long gear 'Iii disposed in the direction of movement of the inking mechanism. This gear 'i0 meshes with a gear 12 on a shaft 'M carrying a roll 'i6 which forms a main part of the inking mechanism. As before explained, the gears 'l0 and 'i2 are preferably helical gears, although a worm and worm gear may also be `employed. The long gear 10 is held against axial movement, and the driven gear 'l2 is disposed near the right end of the long gear 1D when the printing cylinder diameter is small, as is shown in Fig. 1, and is located near the left end of the long gear 1i! when the printing cylinder diameter is large, as is shown in Fig. `2.

It has already been mentioned that the impression roll l and the inking mechanism 40 are preferably geared tog-ether, and in the present mechanism this is done in a very simple way by providing the helical gears 64 and 1l! with meshed bevel gears I8 and 8U, respectively. Power applied to either will drive both, and for reasons which will be clear later when describing a multiple unit press, the power is preferably applied to the horizontal gear 10 by means of a horizontal main drive shaft, broken sections of which are here indicated at 82. In simplest form the main shaft 32 may pass directly through the helical gear 1li and bevel gear 8U. However, this is not at all essential, and if more convenient, the drive shaft may be disposed outside of or above the helical gears, and may be connected thereto by means. of simple spur gearing, or chain and sprocket drives, or whatever may be considered most convenient in a particular press.

r)The printing cylinder itself is driven from the same ultimate source of power as the impression ,and ink rolls, but is preferably driven through an independent train of gearing. The gear ratio between the power source and either the printing cylinder or the rolls may be appropriately changed when the printing cylinder diameter is changed. In such case there is no need to change the diameter of the impression roll or ink roll, or to make any changes in the localized drive of the same.

Multiple printing units may be combined to form an in-line press, and such a press is schematically illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4 of the drawing. The particular press there shown provides a straight-through web lead, which is of advantage when printing on heavy material such as cardboard. The particular press shown in Figs. 3 and 4 comprises three printing units B4, S6 and 8S, each of which may be like the unit already described in connection with Figs. 1 and 2 (although in Figs. 3 and 4 the web lead is shown from right to left, instead of from left to right, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, which look from the geared side of the press).

The in-line press employs two main drive shafts, one being shown at 82, and the other at 9E). In the present case the motor 92 is shown connected to main shaft 9c, but it might equally Well be connected to shaft 82. The form of drive from the motor is unimportant, and is here shown as a multiple V belt drive 94. Drive shaft 9U is connected to drive all of the printing cylinders in unison. However, for purposes of maintaining accurate registration of the multi-color printing operations the drive to the printing cylinders is preferably through appropriate compensating mechanisms, here illustrated as differential-gear compensating units 96. Such units are already 'known and require no detailed description, one form being described in U. S. patent to Grupe 2,163,035, issued June`20, 1939. In principle such a unit comprises differential gearing, with power supplied to one sun gear, and taken out through the other sun gear, the planet gears lbeing carried by means of a ring gear which may be turned Very slowly in one direction or the other to feed in or take out a slight movement `of the driven sun gear relative to the power input. This slightly changes the position of the printing cylinder relative to that of the other printing cylinders. The corrective movement may be fed in by means of a small reversing motor under remote control, but for simplicity is here shown as utilizing the hand cranks indicated at 98. 1

Referring now to Fig. 6, it will be seen that the output of the compensating unit 00 is applied to a gear |00 meshing with an idler |02 and a driven gear |04 on one end of the printing cylinder shaft |06. This is carried in the bearings 22 for slight throw-off movement on the diagonal slides 24 previously referred to. It will be noted that the spur gears |02, |04 are preferably disposed with their centers at an angle corresponding generally to the angle of the slides 24. Moreover, the throw-off distance is preferably less than the length of the gear teeth,` so that the gears will remain at least slightly in mesh even when the printing cylinder is released from the rolls. This is schematically shown in Fig. 7 in which the throw-olf distance |08 is less than the length of the gear teeth H0. In this way synchronism and approximate registration of the multiple printing cylinders is retained after throw-off. f

If desired, the printing cylinders may be released all at once. For this purpose the throwolf mechanisms may be operated hydraulically and connected to a common valve, or they may be operated by solenoids connected in a common electrical circuit. However, inFig. 8 we show a simple mechanical interconnection in accordance with which the control handles 32 of the multiple printing units are all connected by links ||4 so that movement of any one of the handles to throw-olf position will move the others as well. It will be understood that handles 32 turn eccentrics 28 which move connecting rods 30 leading to the printing cylinder bearings 22 carried iny diagonal slides 24. rIhe impression rolls are schematically indicated at |4 and the ink rolls at I6. It will also be understood that a locking mechanism such as that shown at 34 in Fig. 5 could be omitted, or provided at only one point.

Reverting now to Figs. 3 and 4, the second main shaft 82 is connected to the helical gears 'I0 previously described and thus drives the impression and ink rolls. The connection. between shafts 82 and 90 includes a variable speed drive ||5, and in the present oase this is shown as a so-called P. I. V. (positive, infinite, variable) drive made by the Link Belt Company. The speed is gradually varied by a suitable control, here marked I1. An equivalent Reeves drive might also be employed. Indeed a simple change-gear connection might be used, but in such case the printing cylinder diameters employed would be limited by the available gear ratios. With the infinitely variable drive, the printing cylinder diameter may be made anything desired (within minimum and maximum limits) without reference to increments which might be necessitated by gear teeth size and consequent gear ratios. It may be observed that it might be prohibitive in cost to employ a ,P. I. V. drive for each unit, but with the present arrangement using two main drive shafts, a single P. I. V. drive is employed in common for all of v the printing units.

Another advantage of the present arrangement is in simplifying the provision of means to continue rotation of the inking mechanism during throw-olf or temporary shut down. This is desirable in order to prevent drying of the ink on the ink rolls. For this purpose a very small motor vimpression rolls, and is not drivenl thereby because the printing cylinders are in throw-off position. The connection between the P. I. V. drive and the shaft 02 may include another overrunning clutch, indicated at |20, so that shaft 82 may be rotated by small motor H0 withoutl having to drive the P. I. V. drive, the shaft 00, the motor 02, and the printing cylinders.

The press of Figs. 3 and 4 is shown Without driers. When dealing with a thin flexible web, suitable driers may be interposed between the press units. However, `when dealing with a coarse, stiff web it is better not to bend the same excessively, and a straight-through lead is preferable, as shown. Fortunately a stiff web is usually an absorbent web, and it is possible to print in multiple colors without using driers between the press units.l However, some drying may be desired at the end of the multiple printing operation,-and such an arrangement is schematically shown in Fig. 9, in which it will be seen that the three units |22, |24 and |28 are followed by a drier |28. The web lead is straight through except at the drier, where it is bent downward at |30 and then upward at |32.

Fig. 9 illustrates the fact that the particular inking mechanism employed may be varied, and for this purpose different inking mechanisms are shown in the units |22, |24 and |26, although it will be understood that in actual practice the inking mechanisms in any one multiple press are ordinarily and preferably kept alike for the sake of uniformity. Referring to unit |22, the inking mechanism there shown is of a simple type comprising an intermediate ink roll |34 rotating with its lower portion immersed in an ink tank |36. Ink from roll |34 is transferred by means of a transfer ink roll |38 to the printing cylinder |40.

Morevmodern inking mechanisms of the socalled AniloX type may be employed. They permit the use of more volatile inks and higher speed operation. They employ a doctor blade, which helps enclose the volatile ink against evaporation as wellas splashing. A simple arrangement for this purpose is shown in unit |24, in which an ink roll |42 runs in an ink tank |44. A doctor blade |46 bears against the roll |42. The roll |42 is a metal roll having an intagliated surface, and the doctor blade |46 is usually made of rubber.

The inking mechanism shown in unit |26 is another form of Anilox design. In this case an intagliated roll |48 runs in an ink tank |50 and is wiped by a doctor blade |52, much as previously described, but the ink is applied to the printing cylinder |54 through an intermediate transfer roll 50. The transfer roll |50 picks up the ink from the cells or pockets in the surface of the roll |48, and applies it to the surface of the printing cylinder |54.

With the conventional inking mechanism shown in unit |22, the amount of ink transfer is regulated by the pressure between rolls, partially between the rst and second ink rolls |34 and |38, and partially between the ink roll |30 and the printing cylinder |40. In the present The impression rolls are 7 apparatus the worm, worm ,gear and screw mechanism for changing the position of the mechanism for a change in `cylinder diameter may be employed also to adjust the pressure between the ink roll and the printing cylinder. Similarly the worm, worm gear and screw mechanism for changing the position of the impression roll for a change in printing cylinder size,

may be employed to regulate the printing pressure. In the Anilox type of inking mechanismsschematically shown in printing units |24 and |26, the amount of ink may be controlled by yadjustment of the doctor blade pressure, and also by the pressure between the ink roll and the printing cylinder, the latter being adjustable by the worm, worm gear, and .screw mechanism.

If a yconventional inking mechanism is employed as schematically shown in unit |22, the press is reversible, that is, the web can be run through .the press .in ether direction provided that the direction of rotation by the motor Vis appropriately changed. However, inkling mechanism of the Anilox type should be run in only one direction because of the action of the doctor blade.

The particular inking mechanism shown in Figs. 1 and 2 is of the Anilox type, and corresponds nearly to that schematically shown in press unit |.2:6 in Fig. `9. Referring to Figs. 1 .and 2, the pressure of the intagliated roll .16 against the roll 1|6 is regulated by means of hand wheel |60, worms |62, worm gears |64, and screws |266. lThe position of the doctor blade l|68 is regulated by means of hand wheel |10, worm |12, and worm gear |14. However, the .inking mechanism `is not a main feature of the present invention, other than that it should be .adapted :to and mounted for movement 4in the press, as

already described.

AThe printing cylinder itself may be varied in Itype. That contemplated `in the particular press `here illustrated is a so-called rubber plate printing cylinder. This is a metal cylinder having a `scored surface adapted to :receive `sei-called sticky back rubber printing plates. However, the invention is not at all limited .to the use Aof such .a printing cylinder.

Some of the :theory underlying the design of printing presses embodying the present invention maybe described with reference to Fig. lOof the drawing. `In .that figure the printing `cylinder is shown at |16, the impression roll at |18, and the ink roll at |86. The roll |18 is disposed beneath cylinder |16 and is movable in .a vertical direction over a large range, as .is indicated b5 arrow |82. The ink roll |85 is ydisplaced in horizontal relation to the cylinder :|16 'and is movable in horizontal direction over -a large range, as is indicated by arrow |84. The throw-off movement of cylinder |16 is at an .angie which preferably bisects `the .space between a radius running to lroll |18 and another radius `running to roll |86. In the present case vthe angle of direction line |86 Iis simply 45., .and the .small throw-off movement is symbolized .by the short distance :between arrow heads at |86.

It is convenient 'to have the printing cylinder :on top, where it is most readily changeable, .and so that the printing on the Aweb may :be observed from above. However, it is not essential to locate the printing cylinder at the top, .and Fig. .llshows in similar symbolic form vanarrangement .in-.which the impression roll `|88 is at the top, printing cylinder |90 is at the bottom, and ink roll #|92 is horizontally displaced `from the 'printing cylinder. Here again, the throw-off movement indicated at |94 may be at an angle of 45, thus releasing the cylinder equally from the rolls |88 `and |92 but, of course, the movement of the printing cylinder is downward at 15 rather than upward at 45.

Although convenient to deal with a horizontal- ,ly moving web, that is not essential to the invention, and in Fig. 12 we show the invention applied toa vertical web |96. The printing cylinder 'is shown at |98, the impression roll at 20D, and vthe ink roll at 202. The long range movement of the impression roll transversely of the Aweb is symbolized 'by arrow 204, while the long range movement of the ink roll in the direction ofthe web is symbolized by arrow 266. The short throw-off movement of the printing cylinder is indicated at `208, and is in a direction bisecting the radii to the rolls, specically at an angle of 45.

Figs. 13 and 14 show how the web may be vdisposed at an angle, in this case at an angle 45. In Fig. 13 the cylinder is shown at 2m. the impression roll at 2 |2, and the ink roll at 2 I4. The long range movements of the rolls are indicated by Iarrows 2|6 and 2|B, respectively. The small throw-off movement of the cylinder is shown at 220, and it will be noted that in this case the throw-off vmovement is a vertical movement, yet it satisfies the Idesideratum of bisecting the radii to the rolls in order that the printing cylinder be simultaneously released from both rolls.

In Fig. 14 the printing cylinder is shown at 222, the impression roll at 224, and the ink roll at 22B. `Their long range movements are indicated by the arrows 228 and 232. The short throw-off movement of the cylinder 222 is shown at 2.32. In this case the throw-off movement is .a horizontal movement, but it satisfies the test of dividing the .angle between the radii extending to the rolls.

When dealing with a printing cylinder above a horizontal web, there may be diiculty in disposing the ink roll in truly horizontal lrelation to the printing cylinder. Reverting momentarily to IFig. 2 or to Fig. 9, it will be seen that the ink roll is often elevated somewhat, this resulting from the need to locate-the entire inking mechanism above the web when dealing with even the smallest diameter printing cylinder. This results in a modiication of the preferred throwoff-direction. Referring to Fig. 15, the impression roll 234 is disposed beneath the printing cylinder 236 as before, but the inl; roll 238 is disposed on a radius 24D elevated from the horizontal. vrThe long range movements are again indicated by the arrow-s 242 and 2M. The desired .short throw-off movement is indicated at 246. "This is on a direction line bisecting the radii 248 and '241i leading to the rolls 2.34 and 238, respectively.

Referring now to Fig. 16, if the printing cylinder is changed to a new printing cylinder 250 double the previous diameter, the impression roll '234 is lowered, and the `ink roll 238 is moved horizontally, yas shown. The desired throw-off movement of the printing cylinder -is indicated at 252, and is on a direction line which bisects the radii 254 and 25B leading to the rolls. The direction 0f line 252 in Fig. 16 diifers somewhat from the direction of line 246 in Fig. 15. In actual practice `a `throw-off direction is adopted which is preferably a compromise, as suggested by the dotted line 262. The line 266 is satisfactory for either the :smallest or the largest diameter printing cylinder, and its departure from theoretical direction may be quite small.

The arrangement of Figs. 15 and 16 assumes horizontal movement for the ink roll. This is convenient and desirable, but is not essential. Referring to Fig. 17, impression roll 262 is disposed beneath printing cylinder 254, as before, and ink roll 266 is disposed on a radius elevated somewhat from horizontal, as before. The long range movement of roll 262 is vertical, as indicated by arrow 268. The long range movement of roll 263, instead of being horizontal, is shown to be radial, as indi-cated by arrow 21W. The short throw-orf movement of the cylinder is indicated at 272. This may be in a direction bisecting the radii to the rolls. No compromise is needed because there is no change of direction when changing the size of the printing cylinder. However, in this arrangement the long helical gear for driving the innng mechanism is disposed at the angle 2li), and the connection to the main drive shaft is appropriately modied.

Note that these matters need not arise when using the other arrangements shown in Figs. 1K1 through 14 of the drawing. For example, in Fig. 11 the ink roll may be ldisposed in truly horizontal relation to the printing cylinder, for the web is above the ink roll, and there is unlimited room beneath the ink roll for the ink tank and other inking mechanism. Similar remark would apply to Figs. 12, 13 and 14, if the ink tank, etc. is shaped to clear the web.

It is believed that the construction and voperation of our improved printing press, as well as the advantages thereof, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description. The particular arrangement shown places the printing on top of the web where it is visible to the operator, and this is convenient not only for adjusting the registration of multiple printing units, but even with a single unit, `when the press is combined with subsequent fabricating operations, such as perforating, punching, and so on. The location of the printing cylinder facilitates rapid change, for it is located on top in the most convenient place and is readily removed without diiculty. The printing cylinder diameter may be changed without changing the diameter of the impression roll or the inking rolls. The change of printing cylinder diameter may be made without necessitating a laborious or inconvenient change in gear ratio. There is no need to make special gears, or to keep a large stock of change-gears on hand to eiect proper linear speed. Instead the printing' cylinder size may be changed in any desired increments, without limitation caused yby gear tooth size. The change in cylinder size may be effected rapidly by simply backing away the impression and ink rolls, and changing the speed at the 13. I. V. drive. No change in gearing need be made when backing away thc impression and ink rolls.

The web may be released by a rapid and con- Venient throw-01T, and a single throw-onp movement serves to separate the printing cylinder from both the impression roll and the inking roll. The throw-oir operation may be ganged for simultaneous control of all units. The gear relation between the impression roll and the ink roll is such that it is only necessary to synchronize one or the other with the printing cylinder. Because this adjustment is made oetween the two main drive shafts, a single adjustment serves for all of the printing units. The inking mechanism may be of the aniline type using smooth rolls, or of the AniloX type using an intagliated roll and doctor blade, and in either case a greater or lesser number of ink rolls may be employed as desired. The drive of both the impression and ink rolls is from a common main shaft, and is divorced from the drive of the cylinders, which is from another common main shaft. only in requiring but one 13. I. V. drive for all units but also in making it conveniently possible to employ individual independent register control or compensating units for the different printing cylinders. The inking mechanisms may be kept rotating when the press is temporarily shut down, in order to prevent drying of the ink on the rolls. A single small motor takes care of this for all of the printing Many oi the features are of value independently oi the others. For example, the quick throw-ori for moving the printing cylinder at an angle having components for simultaneous separation from both the impression roll and the inking roll would be of value in a press having a xed cylinder size. Conversely, the long helical gear arrangement affording movement of the rolls to accommodate a change in printing cylinder size would be of value even without diagonal throw-01T of the printing cylinder. Inking mechanisms of varied type may be employed. Other .forms of speed adjustment than the P. I. V. drive may be used. Long worms may be used in lieu of long helical gears, or short gears splined for axial movement along splined shafts, and indeed exible shafts, or shafts with universal joints, might be employed to accommodate the lateral movement of the rolls. Other forms of compensating mechanism for registration may be used in lieu of the differential gears mentioned.

These and numerous other changes may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention as sought to be defined in the following claims. In some claims the printing cylinder is said to have ak normally fixed center. This has reference to the change of diameter, and does not exclude the temporary displacement for throw-01T. In some claims the ink roll is said to be sidewardly offset from the printing cylinder, which is intended to include the somewhat elevated position of Figs. l, 2, 15, 16, and 1'7, as well as the truly horizontal offset shown in Figs. 10 and 11.

The reference to the impression roll being below the printing cylinder, and the ink roll being sidewardly offset, while the throw-onc movement is in a diagonal direction, is to be constructed in a relative sense rather than an absolute sense, for the entire group of rolls may be bodily re-oriented, as was explained in connection with Figs. 10 through 17, without changing the signiiicant inter-relation between the cylinder and rolls as contemplated and taught by the present disclosure. For convenience and clarity in definition and simple terms vertical, horizontal, and diagonal are employed in the claims, but are meant in a relative sense. Thus the movement of the impression roll, while usually vertical, would not be vertical in Figs. 12, 13 and le, and the movement of the inin'ng mechanism, while usually horizontal, would not be horizontal in Figs. 12, 13, 14 and 17. Similarly, the throwoff movement of the printing cylinder, although usually diagonal, would not be diagonal in Fig. 13 or 14.

Such an arrangement is convenient not We claim:

l. A printing unit comprising normally fixed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby beneath said printing cylinder to receive a horizontal web therebetween, vertical slides for said impression roll bearings, adjusting means for moving said impression roll bearings for a substantial distance along said slides to accommodate a substantial change in the size of the printing cylinder, inking mechanism including an ink roll sidewardly offset from said printing cylinder, horizontal slides `for said inking mechanism, adjustment means for moving said inking mechanism 'for a substantial distance along .said slides to accommodate a change in the size of the printing cylinder, a power source for driving the printing cylinder and for driving the impression roll, and variable speed gearing of the positive infinitely variable type between said printing cylinder and the impression roll, said variable speed gearing providing a large overall range of speed ratio in minute graduations, in order to maintain proper relative speed upon change in the size of the printing cylinder, whereby it is unnecessary to change the size of the roll.

2. A printing unit comprising normally nxed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby beneath said printing cylinder to receive a horizontal web therebetween, vertical slides for said impression roll bearings, worm, Worm gear and screw adjusting means for moving said impression roll bearings for a substantial distance along said slides to accommodate a change in the size of the printing cylinder, inking mechanism including an ink roll sidewardly offset from said printing cylinder, horizontal slides for said inking mechanism, worm, worm gear and screw adjustment means for moving said inking mechanism for a substantial distance along said slides to accommodate a change in the size of the printing cylinder, means gearing said ink roll and said impression roll to one another for rotation in fixed ratio, a power source for driving the printing cylinder and for driving the impression roll and ink roll, and variable speed gearing of the positive infinitely variable type between said printing cylinder and the rolls, said variable speed gearing providing a large overall range of speed ratio in minute graduations, in order to maintain proper relative speed upon change in the size of the printing cylinder, whereby it is unnecessary to change the size of the rolls.

3. A printing unit comprising normally xed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby beneath said cylinder, vertical slides and associated mechanism for raising or lowering the impression roll, inking mechanism disposed at one side of the printing cylinder, horizontal slides `and associated mechanism for moving the inlring mechanism toward or away from the printing cylinder, a gear oi great axial length meshing with a gear on the inking mechanism for driving the inking mechanism, the axis of said gear being parallel to the horizontal slides, a gear of great axial length meshing with a gear on the impression roll for driving the impression roll, the axis of said gear being parallel to the vertical slides, gears connecting said long gears, said long gears having a length corresponding to the desired range of adjustment and accommodating adjustment of the impression roll and inking mechanism in order to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder.

1l. A printing unit comprising normally fixed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby beneath said cylinder, vertical slides and associated mechanism for raising or lowering the impression roll, inking mechanism disposed at one side of the printing cylinder, horizontal slides and associated mechanism for moving the inking mechanism along the slides, a helical gear of great axial length meshing with a helical gear on the inking mechanism for driving the inking mechanism, the axis oi said gear being parallel to the horizontal slides, a helical gear of great axial length meshing with a helical gear on the impression roll for driving the impression roll, the axis of said gear being parallel to the vertical slides, and gears connecting said helical gears, said long helical gears having a length corresponding to the desired range of adjustment and accommodating adjustment of the impression roll and inking mechanism in order to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder,

5. A printing unit comprising normally xed center bearings and a printing cylinderv carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby beneath said cylinder, vertical slides and associated mechanism for raising or lowering the impression roll, inking mechanism disposed at one side of the printing cylinder, horizontal slides and associated mechanism for moving the inking mechanism along the slides, a gear of great axial length meshing with a gear on the inking mechanism for driving the inking mechanism, the axis of said gear being parallel to the horizontal slides, a gear of great axial length meshing with a gear on the impression roll for driving the impression roll, the axis of said gear being parallel to the vertical slides, gears connecting said long gears, said long gears having a length corresponding to the desired range of adjustment and accommodating adjustment of the impression roll and inking mechanism in order to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder, a power source to drive the printing cylinder and also to drive one of the long gears, and variable speed gearing between said power source and either the printing cylinder or the long gears to maintain desired speed ratio when the size of the printing cylinder is changed.

6. A printing unit comprising normally fixed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby beneath said cylinder, vertical slides and associated mechanism for raising or lowering the impression roll over a substantial distance, inking mechanism disposed at one side of the printing cylinder, horizontal slides and associated mechanism for moving the inking mechanism along the slides for a substantial distance, a helical gear of great axial length meshing with a helical gear on the inking mechanism for driving the inking mechanism, the axis of said gear being parallel to the horizontal slides, a helical gear of great axial length meshing with a helical gear on the impression roll for driving the impression roll, the axis of said gear being parallel to the vertical slides, bevel gears connecting said helical gears, said long helical gears having a length corresponding to the desired range of adjustment and accommodating adjustment of the impression roll and inking mechanism in order to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder, a power source to drive the printing cylinder and also to drive the long horizontal helical gear, and variable speed gearing between said power source and said helical gear to maintain the desired linear speed when the size of the printing cylinder is changed.

7. An in-line press comprising a plurality of printing units, each of said units comprising normally fixed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby beneath said cylinder, inking mechanism disposed at one side of the printing cylinder, gearing connecting said roll and said inking mechanism, a rst main shaft extending longitudinally of the inline press for driving all of the printing cylinders, compensating means between said main shaft and each of said printing cylinders for registration, said compensating means affording adjustment of the cylinders relative to the main shaft and relative to one another, a second main shaft extending longitudinally of vsaid in-line press and connected to the aforesaid rolls and inking mechanism, and a power source to drive both main line shafts.

8. An in-line press comprising a plurality of printing units, each of said units comprising normally xed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby beneath said cylinder, vertical slides and associated mechanism for raising or lowering the impression roll over a substantial distance, inking mechanism disposed at one side of the printing cylinder, horizontal slides and adjustment mechanism for moving the inking mechanism along the slides for a substantial distance, gearing connecting said roll and said inking mechanism, said gearing accommodating adjustment of the impression roll and inking mechanism over a substantial distance to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder, a iirst main shaft extending longitudinally of the in-line press for driving all of the printing cylinders, compensating means between said main shaft and each of said printing cylinders for registration, said compensating means affording adjustment of the cylinder relative to the main shaft and relative to one another, a second main shaft extending longitudinally of said inline press and connected to the aforesaid rolls, a power source to drive both main shafts, and variable speed gearing between said power source and one of said main shafts to maintain the desired linear speed when the size of the printing cylinders is changed.

9. An in-line press having a straight-through web lead, said press comprising a plurality of printing units, each of said units comprising normally fixed center bearings and a 'printing cylinder carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby beneath said cylinder, vertical slides and associated mechanism for raising or lowering the impression roll over a substantial distance, inking mechanism disposed at one side of the printing cylinder, horizontal slides and adjustment mechanism for moving the inking mechanism along the slides for a substantial distance, a helical gear ofgreat axial length meshing with a helical gear on the inking mechanism for driving the inking mechanism, the axis of said gear being parallel to the horizontal slides, a helical gear of great axial length meshing with a helical gear on the impression roll for driving the impression roll, the

axis of said gear being parallel to the vertical slides, gears connecting said long helical gears, said long helical gears having a length corresponding to the desired range of adjustment and accommodating adjustment of the impression roll and inking mechanism in order to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder, a first main shaft extending longitudinally of the in-line press vfor driving all of the printing cylinders, a second main shaft extending longitudinally of said in-line press and connected to the aforesaid long helical gears, a power source to drive both main shafts, and variable speed gearing between said power source and one of said main shafts to maintain the desired linear speed when the size of the printing cylinders is changed.

10. A printing unit comprising a printing cylinder, an impression roll, `inking mechanism including an ink roll, means gearing said rolls together independently of the printing cylinder, a power source to drive the printing cylinder and the rolls, and variable speed gearing of the positive infinitely variable type between said printing cylinder and the'rolls, said variable speed gearing providing a large overall range of speed ratio in minute graduations, in order to provide a desired speed ratio for any desired cylinder diameter. l

'11. A printing unit comprising a printing cylinder, an ink roll, an impression roll, means for moving the ink roll toward or away from the printing cylinder to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder, means for moving the impression roll toward or away from the printing cylinder to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder, means connecting said rolls together for simultaneous rotation, a power source, means connecting said power source to said rolls, the connections being such as to accommodate the movement of the rolls relative to the printing cylinder, means connecting said power source to the printing cylinder, and variable speed gearing of the positive infinitely variable type between said printing cylinder and the rolls, said variable speed gearing providing a large overall range of speed ratio in minute graduations, in order to maintain desired speed ratio when the size of the printing cylinder is changed.

l2. A printing unit comprising normally fixed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby, slides and associated mechanism for moving the impression roll over a substantial distance, a lhelical gear of great axial length meshing with a helical gear on the ilnpression roll for driving the impression roll, the axis of said gear being parallel to the slides, said long helical gear having a length corresponding to the desired range of 'adjustment and accommodating adjustment of the impression roll in order to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder.

13. A printing unit comprising normally 'fixed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, inking mechanism disposed at the printing cylinder, slides and associated mechanism for moving the inking mechanism along the slides for a substantial distance, a helical gear of great axial length meshing with a helical gear on the inking mechanism for driving the inking mechanism, the axis or said gear being parallel to the slides, said long helical gear having a length corresponding to the desired range of adjustment and accommodating adjustment of the inking mechanism in order to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder.

14. A printing unit comprising normally fixed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby, slides and associated mechanism for moving the impression roll over a substantial distance, a helical gear of great axial length meshing with a helical gear on the impression roll for driving the impression roll, the axis of said gear being parallel to the slides, said long helical gear having a length corresponding to the desired range of adjustment and accommodating adjustment of the impression roll in order to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder, a power source to drive the printing cylinder and also to drive the long helical gear, and variable speed gearing of the positive infinitely variable type between said power source and said helical gear to maintain the desired linear speed when the size of the printing cylinder is changed.

15. A printing unit comprising normally xed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, inking mechanism disposed at the printing cylinder, slides and associated mechanism for moving the inking mechanism along the slides for a substantial distance, a helical gear of great axial length meshing with a helical gear on the inking mechanism for driving the inking mechanism, the axis of said gear being parallel to the slides, said long helical gear having a length corresponding to the desired range of adjustment and accommodating adjustment of the inking mechanism in order to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder, a power source to drive the printing cylinder and also to drive the long helical gear, and variable speed gearing of the positive infinitely variable type between said power source and said helical gear to maintain the desired linear speed when the size of the printing cylinder is changed.

16. An in-line press comprising a plurality of printing units, each of said units comprising normally fixed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby, a first main shaft extending longitudinally of the in-line press for driving all of the printing cylinders, compensating means between said main shaft and each of said printing cylinders for registration, said compensating means affording adjustment of the cylinders relative to the main shaft and relative to one another, a second main shaft extending longitudinally of said in-line press and connected to the aforesaid impression rolls, and a power source to drive both main line shafts.

17. An in-line press comprising a plurality of printing units, each of said units comprising normally fixed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, inking mechanism disposed at the printing cylinder, a rst main shaft extending longitudinally of the in-line press for driving all of the printing cylinders, compensating means between said main shaft and each of said printing cylinders for registration, said compensating means affording adjustment of the cylinders relative to the main shaft and relative to one another, a second main shaft extending longitudinally of said in-line press and connected to the aforesaid inking mechanisms, and a power source to drive both main line shafts.

18. An in-line press comprising a plurality of printing units, each of said units comprising normally fixed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, impression. roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby, slides and associated mechanism for moving the impression roll over a substantial distance, a rst main shaft extending longitudinally of the in-line press for driving all of the printing cylinders, compensating means between said main shaft and each of said printing cylinders for registration, said compensating means affording adjustment of the cylinders relative to the main shaft and relative to one another, a second main shaft extending longitudinally of said in-line press and connected to the aforesaid impression rolls, a power source to drive both main shafts, and variable speed gearing between said power source and one of said main shafts to maintain the desired linear speed when the size of the printing cylinders is changed.

19. An in-line press comprising a plurality of printing units, each of said units comprising normally fixed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, inking mechanism disposed at the printing cylinder, slides and adjustment mechanism for moving the inking mechanism along the slides of a substantial distance, a first main shaft extending longitudinally of the in-line press for driving all of the printing cylinders, compensating means between said main shaft and each of said printing cylinders for registration, said compensating means affording adjustment of the cylinders relative to the main shaft and relative to one another, a second main shaft extending longitudinally of said inline press and connected to the aforesaid inking mechanisms, a power source to drive both main shafts, and variable speed gearing between said power source and one of said main shafts to maintain the desired linear speed when the size of the printing cylinders is changed.

20. An in-line press having a straight-through web lead, said press comprising a plurality of printing units, each of said units comprising normally xed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, impression roll bearings and an impression roll carried thereby, slides and associated mechanism for moving the impression roll over a substantial distance, a helical gear of great axial length meshing with a helical gear on the impression roll for driving the impression roll, the axis of said gear being parallel to the slides, said long helical gear having a length corresponding to the desired range of adjustment and accommodating adjustment of the impression roll in order to accommodate a change in size of printing cylinder, a first main shaft extending longitudinally of the in-line press for driving all of the printing cylinders, a second main shaft extending longitudinally of said in-line press and connected to the aforesaid long helical gears, a power source to drive both main shafts, and variable speed gearing between said power source and one of said main shafts to maintain the desired linear speed when the size of the printing cylinders is changed.

21. An in-line press having a straight-through web lead, said press comprising a plurality of printing units, each of said units comprising normally fixed center bearings and a printing cylinder carried thereby, inking mechanism disposed at the printing cylinder, slides and adjustment mechanism for moving the inking mechanism along the slides for a substantial distance, a heli- 17 cal gear of great axial length meshing with a helical gear on the inking mechanism for driving the inking mechanism, the axis of said gear being parallel to the slides, said long helical gears having a length corresponding tb the desired range of adjustment and accommodating adjustment of the inking mechanism in order to accommodate a change in size of printing cylin- 1 der, a rst main shaft extending longitudinally of the in-line press for driving all of the printing cylinders, a second main shaft extending longitudinally of said in-line press and connected to the aforesaid long helical gears, a power source to drive both main shafts, and variable speed gearing between said power source and one of said main shafts to maintain the desired linear speed When the size of the printing cylinders is changed.

22. In a printing unit, bearings for a shaft, slides and associated mechanism for moving the bearings along said slides over a substantial distance for a desired range of adjustment, a helical gear of great axial length disposed outside one of said bearings With its axis in the direction of movement of the bearings, said gear being fixed against axial movement, a helical gear on said shaft meshing with said long helical gear, said 18 long helical gear having a length corresponding to the desired range of adjustment and thereby accommodating the movement of the shaft and bearings along the slides.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification101/181, 101/91, 101/219, 101/247
International ClassificationB41F13/00, B41F13/44
Cooperative ClassificationB41F13/44
European ClassificationB41F13/44