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Publication numberUS2690136 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 28, 1954
Filing dateNov 9, 1949
Priority dateNov 16, 1948
Publication numberUS 2690136 A, US 2690136A, US-A-2690136, US2690136 A, US2690136A
InventorsAlfred Freeman
Original AssigneeAlfred Freeman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Conveyer
US 2690136 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. FREEMAN Sept. 28, 1954 CONVEYER Filed Nov. 9, 1949 4 Sheets-Sheet l A. FREEMAN CONVEYER 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Inventor /)//md flee/nan y Sept. 28, 1954 Filed Nov. 9, 1949 A. FREEMAN Sept. 28, 1954 CONVEYER 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Nov. 9, 1949 A. FREEMAN Sept. 28, 1954 CONVEYER 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Nov. 9, 1949 Patented Sept. 28, 1954 CONVEYER Alfred Freeman, Wellingborough, Northants, England Application November 9, 1949, Serial No. 126,290

Claims priority, application Great Britain November 16, 1948 7 Claims. 1

This invention relates to conveyors of the kind comprising parallel rails constituting tracks and carriages which are adapted for engagement with and to travel along the said tracks, for example for the conveyance of articles or goods from station to station during manufacturing processes and the like. v

In this connection the invention is intended for application principally without, however, limitation in this respect, to conveyors of this class suitable for installation in boot and shoe factories for the purpose of systemising and ex pediting the progress of manufacturing operations on and along production lines. Thus, in a conveyor for this particular purpose each of the carriages is usually in the form of a comparatively short wheeled tray or rack, like a small trolley, adapted for holding or supporting one or more series of lasted uppers, complete with lasts, or articles of footwear in various stages of manufacture, or even individual boot Or shoe components, and so on. For instance, for the support of lasts, a wheeled rack may be furnished with one or more series of upstanding pegs, Whereas other racks or trays may either be provided with work-holding or supporting loops or with receptacles for work in the form of, say, juxtaposed channels or compartmenta all as well known to those acquainted with the boot and shoe industry, Accordingly, the invention is not confined to the provision of carriages of any particular form. In use the carriages are propelled, either by hand or automatically, along the tracks from station to station so that the work conveyed can be dealt with progressively by different operators along the production line.

Moreover, the invention has reference particularly to conveyors of the form wherein the tracks are located at or near the backs of the carriages, thereby providing complete freedom of access to the latter. In such a conveyor the two spaced parallel rails of the track or of each track are arranged one above the other so that the track is in a Vertical, or substantially vertical, plane. The vertical face of the rail-supporting structure may, for example, have attached thereto superimposed pairs of vertically separated rails suchwise as to provide what may be regarded as an open-fronted conveyor.

Heretofore, conveyors of this form have often required to be arranged closely back to back so that carriages were available for the attention of operatives stationed at opposite sides of the double conveyor.

As, however,- such an arrangement is not possible where factory space is strictly limited, the object of the present invention is to provide an improved conveyor which, whilst it-has the advantage of a double (back to back) conveyor is adapted for erection and use in a minimum of space.

The invention accordingly consists of a track comprising two spaced rails arranged one above the other, and, mounted to travel along the track, carriages each of which is adapted to be rocked, whilst still engaged with the lower rail, from a position where it is tilted laterally to one side of the track and is handy for loading or unloading by an operative stationed at this side of the track to another position where it is tilted laterally to the opposite side of the track and is similarly handy for loading or unloading by another operative stationed at this opposite side of the track, according to requirements.

The idea, as will be appreciated, is to provide a track which is common to operatives stationed at opposite sides thereof and which, moreover, will provide freedom of access to the carriages irrespective as to which side of the track they are located.

I In a convenient embodiment of the invention each of the carriages is furnished with longitudinally aligned or alignable wheels engaged with and adapted to run along the lower rail of the track, and is provided with a member or members which are spaced in the lateral direction of the carriage and are adapted for engagement with the upper rail of the said track, the construction and arrangement being such that any one of the carriages can be tilted see-saw fashion laterally of the track to one side or the other with the lower rail as fulcrum, suchwise as to bring the appropriate member or members into contact with the upper rail. That is to say, if the carriage is tilted laterally in one direction the member or members at the appropriate side of the carriage will be brought into contact with the corresponding side of the upper rail, whereas if the carriage is similarly tilted in the other direction the member or members at the other side thereof will be brought into contact with the opposite side of the upper rail. The said members accordingly function not only as stops or abutments to determine the extent of the tilting movement of a carriage in either direction but to assist in supporting the carriage during travel thereof along the track. Thus, as will be understood, a carriage can readily be transferred by a rocking movement about the lower rail from a 3 position at one side or" the track to a corresponding position at the other side thereof.

By the expression laterally tilted in this specification and in the appended claims is meant that carriage, viewing it from one end, is moved bodily to or fro in a direction transverse to its line of travel at the time angularly with respect to a line connecting the upper and lower rails of the track.

The aforesaid combined stop and supporting members on each carriage are preferably in the form of rollers mounted on upwardly directed trunnions, the peripheries of the said rollers being so radiused that the carriage is supportable in an inclined position at the side of the track to which it is moved. In this way, the carriages are sitestively presented towards the operatives, and the loading and unloading of the carriages is thereby facilitated.

Each carriage may advantageously be mounted for movement, to one side or the other, relatively to its longitudinally aligned wheels so that during lateral tilting movement of a carriage in either direction its centre of gravity will be shifted to an extent to preclude any possibility of the carriage lifting or cooking up when lasts are taken off pegs thereon or work is removed from the work supporting elements thereon or receptacles therein, as the case may be.

In order that the invention may be more clearly understood and readily carried into praetical effect, a specific constructional example thereof as applied to a conveyor having a plurality of superimposed tracks, with carriages on each track, will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein,

Figure l is a general perspective View of a sec tion of the said conveyor,

Figure 2 is an elevational view of a fragmentary portion of the superimposed tracks as seen from one side,

Figures 3 and e are detail elevational views of those parts of Figure 2 ringed round at A and B respectively,

Figure 5 is a fragmentary end elevation of the tracks,

Figure 6 is an end elevational view of one of the carriages per se,

Figure 7 is a detail side view of a portion of one end of such carriage,

Figure 8 is an underside plan view of one of the end frames of the carriage, as seen in the direction of the arrow 1) in Figure 6, and

Figure 9 is a detail end elevation showing two carriages laterally tilted in respectively opposite directions.

Like parts are designated by similar reference characters throughout the drawings.

Referring to the drawings it will be seen that the improved conveyor includes a plurality of superimposed tracks T each comprising two vertically spaced upper and lower rails i and 2 respectively. The upper rail l of each track consists of vertically depending flanges of a series of longi tudinally aligned lengths or sections 3 of angle iron, whilst the lower rail 2 of the said track consists of upwardly directed vertical flanges of a further series of longitudinally aligned lengths or sections l of angle iron. The lengths or sections 5 are secured beneath, and supported from, the outer ends of arms 5 carried by uprights 5 of a conveyor frame. The lengths or sections 4, on the other hand, are secured and supported upon the top sides of the said outer ends of the arms 5. By reason of this arrangement, therefore, the

upper rail l of each track T is secured, together with the lower rail 2 of the track above, to the same rail-supporting arms 5. The on er end nortion of each rail-supporting arm 5 is wone end of an attachment block 3 which is arranged between, and bolted by of a o 8 to, the horizontal flanges of lengths or sections 3 and 4 of angle iron. Moreover, at each location where opposed ends of aligned lengths or sections 3 and 4 abut, these ends are, as s n more clearly in Figure 4, bolted to anachment block by means of a pair of the bolts At other appropriately spaced locations the ion as or sections 3 and i are maintained the cor distance apart by means of spacing collars cured in position by rivets ill (see Figure 3) inner ends of the arms 5 may advantageously b-v welded to the uprights 6, and the latter are nished with feet I! (Figure 1) adapted to be socured to the floor.

Each of the carriages C on each track T consists, as shown in Figures 6, l, 8 and 9, of a pull of spaced end frames 52 connected together a the sides by longitudinal tubular steel rails E serving to carry, in the illustrated example, transversely channelled sheet metal tray adapted to receive shoes in various stages 0.

the

manufacture. The tray is suitably welded to rails it. that the end frames 52, which are a st production, may alternatively be connected member or members serving to carry a pegs, work-holding or supporting loops or lent. As will be seen more clearly in Figures and 8, each end frame !2 comprises a leng tubular steel bent into the form of an in U, and a cross member l5 of angle section the ends of which are welded to the lower portions of the vertical limbs of the U. The inner of the vertical depending flange it of the cross member l5 has welded or otherwise suitably cured thereto a pair of spaced angle bracl is I which are drilled to provide bearings for stile l8. This axle is comparatively long and is cured in position by the application to its ends of clips [9. Axially slidable along the axle it tween two collars 20 mounted thereon, is a smell wheel 2i which is peripherally grooved for engagement with and to run along the lower rail 2 of a track T. The inwardly directed flang '22 of the cross member [5 is recessed at 23 to ire room for the wheel 2! and permit of move ment thereof along the wheel axle it. Each riage C is therefore provided at each end and the bottom thereof with a grooved wheel, and when engaged with a rail 2, the two wheels are, of course, longitudinally aligned. Welded or otherwise suitably secured to each end frame i2, near respectively opposite sides of the carriage, are two upwardly directed trunnions through which extend axle pins 25 of rollers 25. The peripheral corners of these rollers are radiused. Moreover, the rollers 26, which constitute the aforementioned combined stop and supporting members, are located well above the end frames l2 to an extent sufficient to enable the two rollers at either side of the carriage to bear inst and run along the appropriate side of the relevant upper rail I when the carriage is laterally tilted. To permit of initial engagement of the wheels 2% of a carriage with the lower rail 2 of a tracl: T, the appropriate rollers 26 can first be readily inserted between the two rails I and 2 of the said track by holding the carriage level, in a horizontal plane. When a carriage is so held the rollers 26 are disposed beneath and clear of the lower edge of the upper rail 1; it is only when the carriage is tilted that the appropriate rollers are swung upwardly and brought into contact with the upper rail.

One of the two carriages depicted in Figure 9 is shown tilted to the left-hand side of one track, whilst the other carriage is shown similarly tilted to the right-hand side of the next track below. Accordingly,'the two rollers 26 at the right-hand side of the upper of the two carriages are shown bearing on and running along the outer side of the upper rail of its track, whereas the two rollers at the left-handside of the lower carriage are shown bearing on and runningalong the inner side of the upper rail of the track below. Whenever a carriage C is transferred by a rocking movement from one side of the relevant track T to the other, the Wheel axles l8 slide through the grooved wheels 2|, this additional component of movement of the carriage changing the centre of gravity of the latter and resulting in a preponderance of weight shifting to that side to keep the carriage steady as previously explained.

To prevent carriages which are travelling at the appropriate side of a track from colliding with the rail-supporting arms 5, the outer end portions of the latter are inclined downwardly somewhat from the track. This will be clear from a consideration of Figure 9, wherein it will be seen that by reason of the inclination of the outer ends of the arms 5, the upper of the two carriages tilted to the left-hand side of its track is clear of those arms 5 serving to support the lower rail 2 of the said track.

If desired, means of any suitable character (not shown) may be provided for automatically effecting transference of carriages from one side of the track to the other. Such means may conveniently consist of guides or cams on the tracks arranged for contact with parts of or on the travelling carriages. Alternatively, guides or cams on the carriages may be adapted for cooperation with the tracks. Similar means may be employed, if necessary, so to move carriages, during travel, as to prevent them from colliding with parts of the conveyor frame.

What I claim then is:

1. A conveyor comprising a track consisting of two parallel rails arranged one above the other, a carriage movable along said track, means on the bottom of the carriage engaging and adapted to run along the lower rail, upwardly directed supporting members at the top of the carriage which are spaced in the lateral direction and are adapted for contact with the upper rail, each supporting member being provided with an upper rail contacting surface and the upper rail contacting surfaces being spaced a substantial distance apart to allow lateral tilting of the location of the center of gravity of the carriage with respect to the lower rail to one side or the other of the lower rail.

2. A conveyor comprising atrack consisting of two parallel rails arranged one above the other, a carriage movable along the track, elements on the bottom of the carriage engaged with and adapted to run along the lower rail of the track, upwardly directed supporting members at the top of the carriage which are spaced in the lateral direction and are adapted for contact with the upper rail, each supporting member being provided with an upper rail contacting roller and the peripheries of the upper rail contacting rollers being spaced a substantial distance apart 0 to allow lateral tilting of the location of the center of gravity of the carriage with respect to the lower rail to one side or the other of the lower rail.

3. A conveyor comprising a track consisting of two parallel rails arranged vertically one above 'the other, a carriage movable along the track,

longitudinally spaced wheels on the bottom of the carriage engaged with and adapted to run along the lower rail of the track, means mounting said wheels for lateral sliding movement relative to the bottom of the carriage, upwardly directed supporting members at each side of the carriage which are spaced in the lateral direction of the carriage and adapted for contact with the upper rail, each supporting member being provided with an upper rail contacting surface and the upper rail contacting surfaces being spaced a substantial distance apart to allow lateral tilting of the location of the center of gravity of the carriage with respect to the lower rail to one side or the other of the said lower rail, the carriage moving bodily sideways in relation to its wheels by virtue of the mounting of the wheels for lateral sliding movement relative to the bottom of the said carriage.

4. A conveyor according to claim 3, wherein the supporting members consist of rollers the axle pins of which are mounted in upwardly directed trunnions provided on the ends of the carriage.

5. A conveyor comprising in combination, a track consisting of two parallel rails arranged vertically one above the other, a carriage movable along the track, transversely disposed axles on the bottom of the carriage upon which are mounted wheels engaged with and adapted to run along the lower rail of the track, the said axles being slidable through the wheels, and the ends of the carriage being provided with upwardly directed parts which are spread in the lateral direction of the carriage and are fitted with supporting rollers adapted for contact as and when required to do so with the relevant side of the upper rail of the track, the construction and arrangement being such that the carriage is laterally tiltable see-saw fashion laterally of the track to either side with the wheels still in engagement with the lower rail and so that the carriage can be transferred as occasion demands from an inclined position at one side of the track determined by contact of the supporting rollers at the appropriate side of the carriage with the opposing side of the upper rail to an oppositely inclined position at the other side of the track determined by contact of the remaining supporting rollers with the opposite side of the said upper rail, the carriage, when tilted to either side as aforesaid, moving bodily sideways in relation to its wheels by reason of the axles sliding through the said wheels so as to change the location of the centre of gravity of the carriage and its contents with respect to the lower rail and shift the preponderance of its weight to that side, for the purpose set forth.

6. A conveyor comprising, in combination, a track consisting of parallel lengths of angle iron arranged vertically one above the other, arms serving to support the said angle irons, uprights carrying the arms, the bottom angle iron being disposed with one flange extending vertically'upwards to constitute the lower rail of the track whilst the top angle iron is disposed to present a vertically depending flange constituting the upper rail of the track, a carriage movable along the track, longitudinally spaced and peripherally grooved wheels on the bottom of the carriage engaged with and adapted to run along the lower rail, upwardly directed supporting members at the top of the carriage which are spaced in the lateral direction and are adapted for contact with the upper rail, and an upper rail contacting roller on each supporting member, the peripheries of said contacting rollers being spaced apart a sufficient distance to allow lateral tilting of the location of the center of gravity of the carriage with respect to the lower rail to one side or the other of the said lower rail.

'7. A conveyor according to claim 2, wherein the carriage consists of two end frames connected by longitudinal members serving to carry supporting means for articles to be conveyed, the said end frames being fitted with transversely disposed axles upon which the wheels are slidably mounted.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 555,280 Boynton Feb. 25, 1896 784,269 Monnier Mar. '7, 1905 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 9,809 Great Britain Apr. 1'7, 1902

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US555280 *Apr 2, 1895Feb 25, 1896 Railway-motor
US784269 *Aug 25, 1903Mar 7, 1905Dimitri MonnierConstruction of railways and vehicles for transporting light loads at high speed.
GB190209809A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2894641 *Aug 16, 1957Jul 14, 1959Edwards Jr Landon BStorage rack
US3002468 *Jun 18, 1958Oct 3, 1961Williams Marion RBasket rack and conveyor mechanism therefor
US3040675 *Feb 25, 1957Jun 26, 1962Rudolfi Gino AAssembly line apparatus
US3146732 *May 7, 1962Sep 1, 1964Wolf & VinePromotional display frame
US5062535 *Feb 15, 1991Nov 5, 1991Frank PotterSide-sliding storage rack for 3480 cartridges
US5205009 *Apr 30, 1992Apr 27, 1993British United Shoe Machine Ltd.Shoe support
US5341944 *Jan 14, 1993Aug 30, 1994Wright Line, Inc.Modular library system with stationary and mobile racks for storage of computer catridges
US5676259 *Aug 18, 1995Oct 14, 1997Automation & Information Planners Inc.Boot storage and retrieval system
US6036424 *Aug 12, 1998Mar 14, 2000Toray Plastics (America), Inc.Cart for unloading and transporting chain
US8763820 *Jun 24, 2009Jul 1, 2014Charles L. HanleyRack and tray device
USRE35047 *Nov 1, 1993Oct 3, 1995Wright Line, Inc.Side-sliding storage rack for 3480 cartridges
WO1997006717A1 *Aug 16, 1996Feb 27, 1997Automation & Information PlannBoot storage and retrieval system
Classifications
U.S. Classification104/121, 12/1.00A, 211/162
International ClassificationB65G9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65G2812/182, B65G9/002
European ClassificationB65G9/00B