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Publication numberUS2690215 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 28, 1954
Filing dateOct 26, 1953
Priority dateOct 26, 1953
Publication numberUS 2690215 A, US 2690215A, US-A-2690215, US2690215 A, US2690215A
InventorsCroxen Donald J
Original AssigneeCroxen Donald J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Venetian blind
US 2690215 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. J. cRoxEN 2,690,215

VENETIAN BLIND Filed Oct. 26, 1953 Sept. 28, 1954 "Wiiih-lulmlmlniiuimlun f za DONALD J. CROXN,

INVENTOR.

ATTORNEK Patented sept. 2s, 1954 UNITED STATES ?ATENT OFFICE VENETIAN BLIND Donald Croxen, Lawndale, Calif.

Application October 26, 1953, Serial No. 388,194

2 Claims. 1

The present invention relates generally to a Venetian blind structure and relates more particularly to a Venetian blind slat arrangement for providing a nearly light-tight closure for windows and the like. The present invention contemplates the use of a plurality of crowned slats that are adapted for edge-to-edge contact when moved to a closed position, thereby to prevent the passage of light thereabout, while still retaining the relative simplicity of such blinds and operating mechanism thereof.

Heretofore, Venetian blind structures have utilized a plurality of slats supported on various types of tapes, cross bars, and lift cord arrangements, these arrangements necessarily extending intermediate the slats and tending to hold such slats in spaced relationship when in a closed position. This prior construction permitted the passage of a suicient amount of light between the slats, as to prohibit the use of such closures in situations requiring the darkening of rooms or the like. For example, in classrooms, it is often desirable to darken the room to enable projection and viewing of motion pictures or slides. Heretofore, it has been necessary to provide the windows of such classrooms with auxiliary curtains, drapes or shades in order to accomplish such darkening, while still retaining conventional Venetian blinds. This additional equipment has been necessarily expensive and often unattractive, thus establishing the desirability for more efcient light control means for the Venetian blinds.

Prior attempts at a solution to this light passing problem in Venetian blinds have included relatively large longitudinal notches in the edge of each slat, these notches being of a length wider than the combined width of two adjacent cross bars or tapes and the lift cord to permit movement of the slats into a closed position. Such construction presents open areas that are either not used or not lled with operating or supporting structure when the blind was closed, thereby to permit the passage of undesirable light therethrough.

With reference to the drawing:

Figure 1 is a perspective view taken from the rear of a Venetian blind structure of the present invention; Y

Figure 2 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line 2 2, Figure 1, and showing the edge-to-edge contact attained by the slats utilized in the present invention;

Figure 3 is a perspective view showing a plurality of adjacent slats;

Figure 4 is a sectional view taken substantially as indicated by line 4 4, Figure l;

Figure 5 is a sectional view of the slats taken at the connection of the support tapes to the tilt bar with the slats shown in an open position; and

Figure 6 is a fragmentary transverse sectional View taken substantially as indicated by line 6 6, Figure 5.

In the drawing, with reference primarily to Figure 1 thereof, the Venetian blind structure of the present invention is shown as indicated generally at I0. As shown, the upper portion of the blind is adapted to be supported by a suitable Valance box II having side portions I2 and I3 and end caps or boxes I4. In accordance with conventional practice, the valance box I4 is adapted to be secured adjacent the upper portions of a Window or the like. The boxes I@ are adapted to house suitable conventional blind operating mechanisms I5. The mechanism I5 may be operatively secured to a tilt bar I6, Fig-- ures 4 and 5, the detail construction thereof to be hereinafter more fully described.

It is to be clearly understood that, While the present Venetian blind structure is shown and will be described in connection with a specific valance box and associated supporting structure, the invention has many applications in connection with a variety of like arrangements.

The Venetian blind structure comprises a plurality of slats and supporting structure therefor that is indicated generally at II and adapted to be supported from the upper end thereof as by any suitable conventional attachment means. The sides or ends of the various slats may be disposed intermediate vertically extending channel members. i8 to prevent the passage of light about the end portions of the blind. The members I8 may be secured adjacent the opposite ends of the slats by any suitable means desired so long as they surround or embrace the outer extremities of the blind.

The blind structure l1 is composed of a plurality of relatively thin elongated slat members I9. These slat members may be made from metal, plastic, wood, or the like and are preferably crowned, as best shown in Figure 2. The slats I9 are adapted to be supported in normally spaced relationship by means of vertically disposed front and rear main supporting tapes 2u and 2| arranged on each side of the plurality of slats. The upper ends of the tapes 26 and 2i may be suitably secured to the tilt bar IB that is rotatably supported within the valance box II, as sho-wn primarily in Figure 5. A plurality of cross tapes 22 are secured to and/or formed from the tapes 2e and 2l, and extend between said main tapes, the slats I9 being adapted to be supported by and rest on these cross tapes. As shown primarily in Figure l, the cross tapes 22 are arranged in staggered relationship to each other and disposed on opposite sides of .the centerlines of the main supporting tapes 22 and 2l, in order thereby to reduce mechanical interference one with the other when the blind structure is moved from one position to another. A space is thus presented transversely intermediate the cross tapes for placement of other supporting and operating mechanism to be hereinafter described.

'Ihe cross tapes 22, being connected to the main supporting tapes 20 and 2l at equally spaced points to form ladders are substantially parallel and are all substantially horizontal at what may be termed the maximum open position of the slats I9 shown in Figure 5. A feature of the invention is that the tilt bar I6 is transversely inclined upwardly and rearwardly from the horizontal, as shown in solid lines in Figure 5, when the cross tapes 22 are substantially horizontal. As may be seen in Figure 5, this relationship between the tilt bar l5 and the cross tapes 22 is provided by connecting the tilt bar to the iront supporting tape 2@ by an upper end portion 26a of the supporting tape that is relatively short as measured upward from the uppermost cross tape 22, and by connecting the tilt bar to the rear supporting tape 2| by a longer end portion 2id of the rear supporting tape 2l.

In order to provide the light-restricting seal contemplated by the present invention, as shown primarily in Figures 3 and 6, each of the slats i9, adjacent opposite ends thereof, is provided with cutouts 23 in the rear edges thereof which may be referred to as rst marginal notches. Ihe cutouts 23 are substantially rectangular and adapted, adjacent one longitudinal end portion thereof, to accommodate the Vstaggered cross tapes 22. The cutouts in adjacent slats i9 have portions that are staggered to correspond to the staggered relationship of the cross tapes 22, thereby to reduce the size of such cutouts and eliminate the beforementioned unnecessary openings that would normally admit unn desirable light therethrough.

In accordance with conventional practice in the manufacture of Venetian blinds, each of the slats i9 is provided with transversely extending elliptical apertures 24 through which a lift cord 25 is adapted to extend. The apertures 24 are in vertical alignment in adjacent slats i9, in transverse alignment with end portions 25 of the cutouts 23 and formed forwardly from the longitudinal centerline 0I the slats i9. The end portions 26 of the cutouts which intercept the extended axes of the elongated apertures 2li are in vertical alignment in adjacent slats i9 and adapted to accommodate the lift cord 25 when the blind is moved to a closed position. It may further be seen that the end portions 25 of the cutouts and the openings 2d are substantially transversely aligned and positioned in the open space between the cross tapes 22.

When the Venetian blind is moved to a closed position with the rear edges of the slats IS directed downwardly, the cross tapes 22 and the lift cord 25 will be disposed in the cutouts 23, thus to permit full closure of the blind structure in a manner shown primarily in Figures 2 and 4. It is to be noted that as the blind is moved toward a closed position, and as the tilt bar H5 moves in a clockwise direction from the solid line position to the dotted line position in Figure 5, the shorter front supporting tape 2E) will be pulled taut while the rear tape 2i will be slackened. As shown, the tilt bar I6 rotates to a position in the order of six degrees past the vertical of the blind structure. The rotation oi the tilt bar l@ past a vertical position, through the shortened front tapes induces a rotational force in each Slat that exceeds that encountered in conventional blind construction to force the rear edges of the slats into positive engagement with the convex surface of adjacent slats. As the slats are thus forcibly moved into the closed position, the depth of the notches 23 can be held to a minimum.

In an open position, as shown in Figures 5 and 6, the rear edges of the slats I9 are adapted for suspension on the tapes 22 at points adjacent the rear main supporting tape 2@ with the inner edge 2l of the cutouts 23 engaging the tapes In order to insure constant precise alignment of the cross tapes 22 with the staggered cutouts 23, as shown in Figures 3 and 6, each of the slats i9 is provided with a pair of T-shaped slots 2i? in the front edge thereof and remote from the cutouts 23. These shaped slats may be referred to as second marginal notches. The slots 28 are staggered in relation to each other in adjacent slats I9 and adapted to receive the cross tapes in a manner permitting the cross tapes te be slidable therein as may be necessary when moving the slats from one position to another. The

- slots 2t are of a width just sumcient to permit reception and free movement of the tapes while still preventing excess light from passing thereabout. Each of the slots iid has one end thereof in transverse alignment with the correspending end of the adjacent cutout 23, 'thus to guide the slats IS and insure constant disposition of the cross tapes 22 in the cutouts rIlhese slots 23 also permit a reduction in the Width of the cutouts 23 as might otherwise be required to insure the constant alignment of the tapes 22 therein.

The slots 28 also form, as best shown in ure 6, pair of oppositely directed tongues fd having their adjacent ends spaced apart to facilitate reception of the cross tapes 22 into the slots 28. The tongues 29, once the tapes 22 are disposed in the slots 28, act to hold the slats against pivotal mcvement relative to the cross tapes. This construction thus prevents move- K ment of the slats by reason of drafts or wind currents as well as careless L'handling of the slats by occupants of the room in which the blinds are mounted.

As shown in Figure 3, each end or" the slats i@ is provided with a group consisting or" a cutout or i'lrst marginal notch, elliptical opening or aperture and T-shaped slot or second marginal notch which will cooperate to accomplish the purpose of the present invention. These necessary open areas through the slats are formed in such a manner as to reduce light passing openings to a minimum and to present no open areas that are not used in the maintenance of effective and reliable operating characteristics for the blind. The group of openings at each end of the slats ld are reversed in order to maintain uniiormly manufactured articles.

Having thus described the invention and the present embodiment thereof, it is desired to emphasize the fact that other modiiications may be resorted to in a manner only limited by a just interpretation of the following claims.

I claim:

l. A set of slats of curved cross sectional coniguration for use in a full-closure Venetian blind having at least two lift cords and at least two corresponding pairs of vertical supporting tapes with the vertical tapes of each pair interconnected by cross tapes to form at least two ladders, and with the cross tapes narrower than the supporting tapes and staggered alternately on opposite sidesof the center lines of the supporting tapes, each of the slats of said set having a group of openings for cooperation with each of said ladders and the corresponding lift cord, one of said openings of each group being an elongated aperture for said lift cord with the axis of the aperture extending transversely of the slat, said aperture being positioned to one side end of one of said cross tapes, the dimension of said rst notch longitudinally of the slat being greater than the width oi a cross tape but less than twice such Width, with an end portion of said first notch intercepting the extended axis of said aperture to receive said lift cord when the blind is closed, another of said openings of each group being a second notch in the margin of the slat on the same side of the longitudinal center line of the slat as said apertLu'e for the other end of said one cross tape, said second notch having a relatively narrow marginal entrance and having a dimension longitudinally of the slat substantially equal to the width of a cross tape, said rst notches of the successive slats extending alternately in opposite directions from the extended axes of the corresponding apertures in the slats with said end portions of the iirst notches of the successive slats in vertical alignment, said second notches of the successive slats being likewise positioned alternately on opposite sides of the axes of the corresponding apertures of the slats.

2. A full-closure Venetian blind, comprising: a vertical series of horizontal slats; at least two ladders supporting said slats, each of said ladders comprising a front vertical supporting tape and a rear vertical supporting tape interconnected by a plurality of vertically spaced cross tapes, said cross tapes being narrower than the supporting tapes and staggered alternately on opposite sides of the center lines of the supporting tapes; lift cords passing down through said ladders between said alternately staggered cross tapes; a plurality of vertically spaced horizontal slats of curved cross sectional configuration supported by said cross tapes, each of said slats having a group of openings for cooperation with each of said ladders and the corresponding lift cord, one of said openings of each ygroup being an elongated aperture for said lift cord with the axis of the aperture extending transversely of the slat, said aperture being positioned to one side of the longitudinal center line of the slat, another of said openings of each group being a irst notch in the margin of the slat to the other side of the longitudinal center line of the slat for one end of one said cross tapes, the dimension of said first notch longitudinally of the slat being greater than the width of a cross tape but less than twice such width, with an end portion of said iirst notch intercepting the extended axis of said aperture to receive said lift cord when the blind is closed, another of said openings of each group being a second notch in the margin of the slat on the same side of the longitudinal center line of the slat as said aperture for the other end of said one cross tape, said second notch having a relatively narrow marginal entrance and having a dimension longitudinally of the slat substantially equal to the width of a cross tape, said rst notches of the successive slats extending alternately in opposite directions from the extended axes of the corresponding apertures in the slats with said end portions of the first notches of the successive slats in vertical alignment, said second notches of the successive slats being likewise positioned alternately on opposite sides of the axes of the correspond- Y ing apertures of the slats; and an upper horizontal tilt bar rotatable about an axis longitudinally thereof, the front of said tilt bar being operatively connected with the front supporting tape of each ladder at a given distance from the uppermost cross tape of the ladder and the rear of the tilt bar being connected to the rear supporting tape of each ladder at a greater distance from the uppermost cross tape of the ladder, whereby the cross tapes are positioned substantially horizontally when said tilt bar is tilted upwardly and rearwardly from the horizontal.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,572,224 Walker Oct. 23, 1951 2,573,700 Ferguson et al. Nov. 6, 1951 2,646,115 Bucher et al July 21, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2572224 *Dec 14, 1945Oct 23, 1951Brooks WalkerVenetian blind slat
US2573700 *May 11, 1949Nov 6, 1951Ferguson Harold WVenetian blind
US2646115 *Jan 24, 1952Jul 21, 1953Hunter Douglas CorpVenetian blind
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2983316 *May 8, 1958May 9, 1961Croxen Donald JVenetian blind
US3170505 *Dec 27, 1962Feb 23, 1965Levolor Lorentzen IncFull-closure type venetian blinds
US3189081 *Oct 26, 1962Jun 15, 1965Levolor Lorentzen IncVenetian blind slat and cross tape construction
US5386867 *May 20, 1993Feb 7, 1995Care Mate International Co., Ltd.Venetian blind
US5409050 *Sep 24, 1993Apr 25, 1995Hong; AmyVenetian blind
US5573051 *Feb 6, 1995Nov 12, 1996Judkins; RenVenetian type blinds
US5692552 *Jun 10, 1996Dec 2, 1997Judkins; RenVenetian type blinds
US5806579 *Jul 18, 1997Sep 15, 1998Judkins; RenVenetian type blinds having opposed lift cords
US5839494 *Dec 27, 1997Nov 24, 1998Judkins; RenBottom and top stacking venetian type blind with fixed headrail tilt
US6033504 *Aug 28, 1998Mar 7, 2000Judkins; RenMaterial for venetian type blinds
US6068039 *Apr 14, 1997May 30, 2000Judkins; RenMaterial for venetian type blinds
US6263944Nov 18, 1997Jul 24, 2001Ren JudkinsVenetian type blinds
US6443042Mar 31, 2000Sep 3, 2002Newell Operating CompanyMethod and apparatus for manufacturing a wood blind
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/173.00R
International ClassificationE06B9/384, E06B9/38
Cooperative ClassificationE06B9/384
European ClassificationE06B9/384