Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2691291 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 12, 1954
Filing dateAug 2, 1949
Priority dateAug 2, 1949
Publication numberUS 2691291 A, US 2691291A, US-A-2691291, US2691291 A, US2691291A
InventorsAlbert Henderson
Original AssigneeAlbert Henderson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building of precast concrete segments
US 2691291 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1954 A. HENDERSON 2691291 BUILDING 0F PRECAST CONCRETE SEGMENTS Filed Aug. 2, 1949 3 Sheefs-Sheet 1 IN V EN TOR.

Oct. 12, 1954 A. HENDERSON 2,691,291

BUILDING OF PRECAST CONCRETE SEGMENTS IN VEN TOR.

Oct. 12, 1954 A. HENDERSON 2,691,291

BUILDING 0F PRECAST CONCRETE SEGMENTS Filed Aug. 2, 1949 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. H4 BERT HENDE RSOA/ Patented Oct. 12, 1954 BUILDING OF PRECAST CONCRETE SEGMENTS Albert Henderson, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Application August 2, 1949, Serial No. 108,131

Claims. 1

This invention relates to the art of building houses, apartments and other structures wherein these structures comprise multiples of a common precast reinforced concrete segment which are cast substantially in a horizontal position, then later erected in a vertical position in abutting end to end relation. The segment is a one piece concrete casting having spaced walls supporting a roof and a floor and in some cases I use only one wall, the roof and floor projecting from the wall in cantilever fashion.

Another object of this invention is to avoid the use of segments that are too large or unwieldy. To this end I form the building with a plane of division along its longitudinal axis and use two similar shaped segments that abut at said plane, and thus provide a complete cross sectional unit of a building, the two segments being secured together at the longitudinal joints by welding together reinforcing rods that are embedded in each segment. All segments may have their reinforcing welded together at all the joints.

Another object of this invention is to provide multiples of a segment, each of which has short portions projecting from an inner wall to provide one half of a hallway floor, roof and duct, so that these segments when erected provide two rooms with a hallway therebetween.

Another object of this invention is to install concrete partitions, door frames, doors, windows, plaster or stucco work while the segment is in a horizontal position so that they act as bracing when the hardened segment is being hoisted to a vertical position.

Another object of this invention is to provide a precast concrete end enclosure or wall for the segments which can be made detachable by using bolts so that the building may be made longer without destroying materials.

Another object of this invention is to provide a precast concrete segment having a side wall, two end walls, partitions, a roof and a floor, all integrally cast in one piece and assemblying it with another similar segment in longitudinally abutting engagement and securing the two segments together at their longitudinal joints.

Another object of this invention is to provide similar segments for a house and using the same similar shaped segments for a porch for the house.

Another object of this invention is to provide a false gable roof portion to provide valleys where a series of assembled gable roof segments are connected with a series of transversely disposed similar shaped segments.

Another object of this invention is to provide a precast concrete chimney and fireplace made in one piece which can be attached to the side of a segment or to the precast concrete end wall or I may cast the chimney and fireplace integrally with the segment or with the end wall.

This invention will greatly reduce current high building costs and provides fireproof, bug and rodent-proof housing for the low income group which cannot afford the prices asked for houses built by present methods. This type of house eliminates many high priced building materials.

A complete understanding of the invention may be obtained from the following detailed description and explanation which refer to the accompanying drawings. In the drawings Fig. 1 is a perspective elevation of my precast concrete segment for small buildings.

Fig. 2 is a perspective elevation of my precast concrete end wall for my segment in Fig. 1.

Fig; 3 is an elevation of assembled segments and end walls.

Fig. 4 is a plan of assembled segments and end walls.

Fig. 5 is a perspective elevation of assembled segments with porch.

Fig. 6 is an elevation of my small segmental buildings side by side.

Fig. 7 is a perspective of two half segments.

Fig. 8 is a front elevation of two segments, one being disposed within the other.

Fig. 9 is a front elevation of a segment for a multi-story building.

Fig. 9a is a longitudinal sectional view through an assembly of segments as formed in Fig. 9, showing the segments in section on the line IXAIX-A of Fig. 9;

Fig. 9b is an enlarged View showing the manner in which the reinforcement members are welded together at the center lines of the segments.

Figs. 10 and 11 are a side elevation and plan of a longitudinal segment.

Figs. 12 and 13 are fragmentary front and side elevation of the end wall and chimney and fireplace.

Fig. 14 is a front elevation of two similar sloped segments.

Referring in detail to the drawings and, for the present to Fig 1, precast concrete building segment I is made in one piece and comprises spaced walls 2, floor 3, and roof 4, and gutters 5.

I put gable roofs on my small building segments so that the concrete in the roof is always in compression, thereby eliminating the necessity of 3 roofing material, as concrete in compression never cracks.

The reinforcing in flat roofs may be prestressed so that the roof concrete is always in compression thereby making unnecessary the application of roofing material such as shingles, tile, etc. A prestressed reinforced concrete roof never leaks. The roof and walls of my segments may be sprayed with colored elastic coating.

Segment may have duct 3a. cast integrally to it and have opening 32; in the floor communicating with duct 3a. The duct can convey a heating and airconditioning means and it may be used for piping or electric wires. Door frame 6 is made from structural steel and is embedded in the concrete wall. The frame is placed in the form, then the segment concrete is cast around it and the reinforcement. The frame is thus securely held and provides excellent bracing for the wall which has lost much of its cross section and strength due to the door opening. I may install the door l while the segment is in a horizontal position. Window 8 also has its frame placed in the mold before casting the segment. This braces the wall and compensates for the loss of cross section in the concrete wall so that when the segment is tilted up to a vertical position the walls will not crack. This is very important especially in multistory buildings.

The segment lengths are from i to 6 feet and the side walls must be very stiff. Holes 9 through the segment are for tie bolts to clamp the segments together. Insulation board Hi is placed in the form and the concrete is cast against it, thereby bonding the insulation board securely to the segment. The insulation board It may extend all around the inside of the segment and may form the inside walls or core of the mold for the segment. If a separate core is used in the mold then it could be quickly and easily extracted without having to collapse the core. The board ill would hold the green concrete in place while the core could be quickly removed to be used for making another segment.

Gasket H fragmentarily shown in Fig. 1 may be made of sponge rubber, asbestos or insulation board. It is applied to the segment before erection and it may be placed in the bottom of the mold and the concrete of the segment cast on it. This would prevent leakage in the mold and also bond the gasket II to the segment. The gasket extends all around the segment including below the gutters 5.

Fig. 2 shows the precast concrete end wall 12 for enclosing segment i. This end wall also closes on the gutters 5, duct 30!. and also the space below the floor. The width of the end wall is wide enough to extend from outside of gutter to outside gutter. Holes 13 are provided for bolts to secure the end wall to the segment.

Door opening id and window opening l may be provided where required. In some cases I may cast the end wall l2 directly to the segment after the segment is cast.

Figs. 3 and 4 show assembled standard segments 1 and l and end walls 12 in one building in connection with other assembled segments and end walls I2 disposed transversely to each other and having false roof portion It resting on some of the segments to provide a valley at the junction of the two sets of assembled segments. False roof It may be made from precast concrete in two pieces, each piece having a lip which fits into the gutters of the segments on which the false roof rests. The false roof is set in a mastic bed and will stop any leaking of water under the false roof I6.

Tie bolts ll tie the assembled segments and end walls together.

Fig. 5 shows a building made up of my segments I and end wall l2. Porch I8 is also made up of standard segments I. I may fashion a porch end wall trim and porch rail from end wall 12. I may apply the standard segments sideways against several of the end to end arrangement of the segments to form a side porch.

Fig. 6 shows two of my segmental buildings 19 and 20 in side by side relationship, end walls l2 being provided with door and windows. The end walls l2 abut side by side and cover the space between the two buildings under their gutters. I may provide openings in some cases in end wall l2 so that gutters could drain through the end wall.

Fig. 7 shows segment 2| made up of two halves 22 and 23 and are secured at their longitudinal center line by bolts 24 at lugs 25. W'indow open ing 25w has grooved upper and lower members 25b cast integrally to some of the segments where light is required.

Fig. 8 shows segment 26 made up of an outer segment 21 and inner segment 28. The segments have air space 29 and segment 28 rests on and is positioned by insulating cushions 30. This type of building would be shockproof.

Figs. 9 and 90. respectively show a multi-story building segment 31 and an assembly of such segments to form spaced rooms 32 with hallway 33 therebetween and ducts 34 disposed above the floors. The building 31 is made up of two oppositely disposed precast concrete segments, the segments being similar and having supporting walls 35 and floors 36, and inner walls 3?. A roof 38 is formed integrally with the walls 35 and 31, as are the floor 36 and. ducts 34 and their walls 39. Balconies 40 may be cast integrally with the segments. The reinforcing lla embedded in the concrete of the roof floors, walls and duct may be welded .at the joints of the segments such as at 4| as shown more clearly in Fig. 9b. Longitudinal partition 42 and cross partition 42a are made of concrete and may be installed while the segment is in a horizontal position. Door openings 43 may be provided in the partitions and walls 35 and 31 where required. Plaster coat 44 may be applied to the segment when it is also in a horizontal position as it will help to stiiien the segment. Outside coating 45 may be a veneer hardening elastic colored coating. Removable covers 46 are used on the ducts. Tie rods Mb in holes 9a hold the segments assembled, as do the rods H in Fig. 3.

Figs. 10 and 11 show a longitudinal precast concrete segment '47 having end walls t8, partition walls 49 and a side wall so, a floor 5|, and a roof 52 with a gutter 53, all of which are cast in one piece. Door opening 54 is provided where required. Windows 55 may be provided in wall '50. Two of the segments 4'! make up an entire building and are fastened together at the longitudinal vertical mid plane of the building.

'Figs. 12 and 13 shows an end Wall fragment 56 and chimney and. fireplace 5'! detachably secured to the end wall or to a segment. The chimney and fireplace may be cast integrally to the end wall or to the side of a segment, openings being provided in the end wall or segment wall to accommodate the fireplace.

Fig. 14 shows portion of a building 58 made up of two oppositely disposed segments 59 and having light well 60 windows 6| and skylight 62 disposed in the segments. Crane run way 63 is cast integrally to the segment; each segment has floor 64 supporting wall 66 and roof 65 and gutter 61. As the floor 64 may carry a heavy load and it may have too long a span it is shortened and a field cast floor 68 is placed between the two floors of the segments.

The reinforcing of the segment floors and the field cast floor may be welded together and form a tie across the total width of the floor, thereby securely anchoring the tWo segments. The reinforcing on the roofs 65 may be welded at the longitudinal joint 69. The segments 59 rest on field cast footings 10.

To facilitate welding of the reinforcement, pockets or recesses are left in the concrete at the joints to render the reinforcing rods accessible for welding. For example, when the abutting ends of reinforcement lla are welded in Fig. 9, these pockets at 4! are filled with grout or the like, as indicated by the dots.

The placing of insulating boards in the molds and bonding the boards to the spaced walls, ceiling and floor, not only makes the removal of the mold core easy and quicker than extraction under ordinary conditions but no collapsible core is necessary and the insulating boards can easily be trimmed at the joints where the segments meet, so that if the segments do not exactly fit the boards can be made level.

In some cases I may make the segments of reinforced gypsum and I may set forms in the mold and cast the gypsum against the insulating boards, thus eliminating hand trowelling of the interior plastering.

Although I have illustrated and described but a preferred embodiment of the invention with a few modifications, it will be understood that changes in the details of construction disclosed may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A multi-story building that comprises pairs of oppositely-disposed concrete castings, each of which castings extends across one-half the width of the building, the pairs being alined with one another in directions longitudinally of the building, in abutting relation along transverse vertical planes and each casting having spaced integral vertical walls perpendicular to said planes, for the full height of the building, and floor members integral therewith, to form rooms, one vertical wall of each casting being disposed in a plane parallel to the longitudinal center line of the building and spaced laterally from said line, to serve as one wall of a hallway, and shelf-like extensions integral with the hallway walls and extending crosswise of the hallway space, to form a floor therefor.

2. A multi-story building that comprises pairs of oppositely-disposed concrete castings, each of which castings extends across one-half the width of the building, the pairs being alined with one another in directions longitudinally of the building, in abutting relation along transverse vertical planes and each casting having spaced integral vertical walls perpendicular to said planes, for the full height of the building, and floor members integral therewith, to form rooms, one vertical wall of each casting being disposed in a plane parallel to the longitudinal center line of the building and spaced laterally from said line, to serve as one wall of a hallway, shelf-like extensions integral with the hallway walls and extending crosswise of the hallway space, to form a floor therefor, and other shelf-like extensions below the first-named extensions, to serve as conduit walls. a

3. A building having spaced rooms with a hallway therebetween, comprising pairs of precast concrete castings, tie members holding the pairs sequentially arranged in abutting relation longitudinally of the building, the castings of each pair being assembled in relatively-opposed abutting relation, at opposite sides of the longitudinal center line of the building, tie members holding the members of each pair together, and inner and outer side walls formed with each casting, floor and roof members formed integrally with the side walls, portions of the floor members extending in cantilever fashion from the inner side walls toward the longitudinal mid plane of the building, to serve as hall floor members.

4. A building having spaced rooms with a hallway therebetween, comprising pairs of precast concrete castings, tie members holding the pairs sequentially arranged in abutting relation longitudinally of the building, the castings of each pair being assembled in relatively-opposed abutting relation, at opposite sides of the longitudinal center line of the building, tie members holding the members of each pair together, and inner and outer side walls formed with each castfloor and roof members formed integrally with the side walls, portions of the floor members extending in cantilever fashion from the inner side walls toward the longitudinal mid plane of the building, to serve as hall floor members, and the roof members extending to the longitudinal mid plane of the building for edgeto-edge engagement with one another.

5. A building having spaced rooms with a hallway therebetween, comprising pairs of precast concrete castings, tie members holding the pairs sequentially arranged in abutting relation longitudinally of the building, the castings of each pair being assembled in relatively-opposed abutting relation, at opposite sides of the longitudinal center line of the building, tie members holding the members of each pair together, and inner and outer side walls formed with each casting, floor and roof members formed integrally with the side walls, portions of the floor members extending in cantilever fashion from the inner side Walls toward the longitudinal mid plane of the building, to serve as hall floor members, and ledge-like projections extending inwardly from the inner walls, in vertically-spaced relation to the hall floor members, to thereby serve as conduit walls.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,392,402 Cottman Oct. 4, 1921 1,411,005 Dula Mar. 28, 1922 1,697,070 Knight Jan. 1, 1929 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 144,913 Great Britain of 1920 743,766 France of 1933 754,815 France of 1933 397,695 Great Britain of 1933 536,572 Great Britain of 1940 919,044 France of 1947 588,623 Great Britain of 1947

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1392402 *Jul 13, 1920Oct 4, 1921Clark Cottman RichardBuilding-wall construction
US1411005 *Jun 12, 1919Mar 28, 1922Robert B DulaBuilding block
US1697070 *Aug 10, 1921Jan 1, 1929Herbert M KnightFloor
FR743760A * Title not available
FR754815A * Title not available
FR919044A * Title not available
GB144913A * Title not available
GB397695A * Title not available
GB536572A * Title not available
GB588623A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3201907 *Dec 5, 1956Aug 24, 1965Albert HendersonPrecast segmental building units
US3252430 *May 31, 1963May 24, 1966Talbot WaggonfabBox-shaped body for street and rail vehicles
US3264791 *Mar 4, 1963Aug 9, 1966Square D CoBuilding floor construction and underfloor wiring duct system
US3292327 *Sep 8, 1961Dec 20, 1966Patent Concern NvPlural story building comprising superimposed box-shaped dwelling units
US3301249 *Jun 3, 1964Jan 31, 1967Prekast Fireplace Mfg CompanyPrecast fireplace, methods of manufacture and erection
US3377755 *Jan 15, 1964Apr 16, 1968Stucky Fritz ChristophPrefabricated building units including prestressed floor panels with upstanding end members connected by tension means
US3442056 *Mar 2, 1966May 6, 1969Hendricus Jacobus Cornelis NiePrefabricated building section with wall,floor and ceiling components cast in profiled edge beams
US3455075 *May 1, 1967Jul 15, 1969Frey ChristianModular building unit
US3527002 *Feb 15, 1968Sep 8, 1970Austin & MeadModular building structure
US3590392 *Jun 12, 1968Jul 6, 1971American Standard IncPrefabricated bathroom assembly
US3596417 *Apr 9, 1969Aug 3, 1971Zachry Co H BPrecast rooms
US3676536 *Jan 10, 1969Jul 11, 1972Shelley Systems IncSystem for producing modular building blocks
US3690077 *Mar 4, 1970Sep 12, 1972Kisner Clinton EBuilding construction
US3724141 *Jan 15, 1970Apr 3, 1973Kelleher MModular units, buildings and systems
US3748794 *Nov 20, 1970Jul 31, 1973R DoddsBuilding construction and method
US3778528 *Apr 27, 1972Dec 11, 1973Heifetz SModular building unit and method for making same
US3898776 *Jul 2, 1973Aug 12, 1975Zachry Co H BPrecast concrete housing
US4010579 *Sep 29, 1975Mar 8, 1977Mario GalvagniThree dimensional pre-fabricated structural elements for building habitation units
US4016859 *Jan 2, 1976Apr 12, 1977Landowski Edmund APre-cast fireplace and flue assembly
US4023315 *Nov 4, 1971May 17, 1977Elcon A.G.Prefabricated buildings
US4035966 *Sep 23, 1976Jul 19, 1977Leon Eugenie Daniel DompasStructure having vertical bearer walls and horizontal ceilings
US4106243 *Jan 25, 1977Aug 15, 1978Pepsico Inc.Sloped roof construction for modular building structures
US4120133 *Jul 24, 1974Oct 17, 1978Credelca A.G.Method of constructing a transportable prefabricated room element
US4136492 *Jun 4, 1973Jan 30, 1979Willingham John HIndustrialized building construction
US4553362 *Jan 17, 1983Nov 19, 1985Imperial Oil LimitedPrefabricated building units
US4759158 *Aug 29, 1986Jul 26, 1988Andre AubrySet of prefabricated construction elements
US4835936 *May 16, 1984Jun 6, 1989Marcel MatiereProcess for obtaining hollow structures such as conduits, silos or shelters
US5906075 *Feb 6, 1997May 25, 1999Sowers; John MarkModular building structure
US6035583 *Sep 19, 1997Mar 14, 2000Papke; William R.Extruded building and method and apparatus related to same
US6035585 *Apr 6, 1998Mar 14, 2000Boyd; Jon TaylorApparatus and method for a portable, modular, vehicle washing and servicing structure
US7673422 *Nov 23, 2005Mar 9, 2010Peter William De La MarcheModular buildings
US8065840 *Apr 6, 2009Nov 29, 2011Syed Azmat Ali ZaidiModular building construction system and method of constructing
US8082699 *Jan 22, 2009Dec 27, 2011Kychelhahn Jerry AModular structure
US8132388Dec 31, 2008Mar 13, 2012The Spancrete Group, Inc.Modular concrete building
US8156689 *Nov 6, 2007Apr 17, 2012Eisenmann AgLarge-capacity booth for the treatment, in particular the spraying and/or drying, of workpieces
US8156691 *Feb 11, 2010Apr 17, 2012New Enterprise Stone and Line Co., IncModular building structure with foldable landing
US8353131 *Jan 11, 2007Jan 15, 2013Freet Patrick ALoq-kit building component system
US8397467Dec 31, 2008Mar 19, 2013The Spancrete Group, Inc.Methods and apparatus for concrete panel connections
US8490363Mar 13, 2012Jul 23, 2013The Spancrete Group, Inc.Modular concrete building
US8615933 *Nov 15, 2003Dec 31, 2013Stephen Day BroderickBuilding block
US8615934 *Oct 7, 2011Dec 31, 2013Stephen C. WebbPanelized portable shelter
US8661742 *May 6, 2005Mar 4, 2014Christopher M. HuntMoisture and runoff removal system
US8763317Dec 31, 2008Jul 1, 2014The Spancrete Group, Inc.Concrete roof panel
US9556629 *Aug 7, 2013Jan 31, 2017Benjamin BravoPrecast concrete module which can be adapted internally to multiple uses
US9631358 *May 12, 2016Apr 25, 2017Cecil Darel TrahanModular building system
US20040159052 *Nov 15, 2003Aug 19, 2004Broderick Stephen DayBuilding block
US20060130422 *Nov 23, 2005Jun 22, 2006De La Marche Peter WModular buildings
US20070213960 *Jan 11, 2007Sep 13, 2007Freet Patrick ALoq.kit building component system
US20070251184 *Apr 17, 2006Nov 1, 2007Steven SchumannSelf-supporting modular wall
US20080110104 *Nov 6, 2007May 15, 2008Eisenmann Anlagenbau Gmbh & Co. KgLarge-capacity booth for the treatment, in particular the spraying and/or drying, of workpieces
US20090205287 *Apr 25, 2007Aug 20, 2009Luc SauteraudQuick construction component
US20100162651 *Dec 31, 2008Jul 1, 2010The Spancrete Group, Inc.Concrete roof panel
US20100162655 *Dec 31, 2008Jul 1, 2010The Spancrete Group, Inc.Methods and apparatus for concrete panel connections
US20100162658 *Dec 31, 2008Jul 1, 2010The Spancrete Group, Inc.Modular concrete building
US20100269420 *Apr 6, 2009Oct 28, 2010Syed Azmat Ali ZaidiBuilding construction system
US20110023382 *Feb 11, 2010Feb 3, 2011New Enterprise Stone & Lime Company, Inc., d/b/a Newcrete ProductsModular building structure with foldable landing
US20110232543 *Mar 24, 2010Sep 29, 2011Paramount Structures Inc.Attachment mechanism for blast resistant modular buildings
US20140124053 *Nov 8, 2012May 8, 2014Boris BlankReservoir Accessory Assembly
US20150040499 *Aug 7, 2013Feb 12, 2015Benjamin BravoPrecast concrete module which can be adapted internally to multiple uses
US20160116112 *Oct 21, 2015Apr 28, 2016Anchor Concrete Products Ltd.Modular Assembly For Fabricating A Hollow Structure
US20170044754 *Aug 5, 2016Feb 16, 2017Eduardo Ricardo AguilaPrecast modular living habitat
EP0160155A1 *Apr 24, 1984Nov 6, 1985André AubrySet of prefabricated construction elements
EP0161370A1 *May 21, 1984Nov 21, 1985Marcel MichelettiMethod of constructing small buildings, and buildings obtained by carrying out the method
EP0513435A1 *Oct 15, 1991Nov 19, 1992Eberhard SchradeMethod of constructing edifices and buildings and prefabricated module for executing the method
EP1207251A1 *Nov 13, 2001May 22, 2002Ludwig SindelCar port
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/79.9, 52/206, 52/27, 126/500, 52/79.14, 52/11, 52/18, 52/220.2, 52/79.7
International ClassificationE04B1/348
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/34823
European ClassificationE04B1/348C2