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Publication numberUS2693591 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 2, 1954
Filing dateOct 24, 1950
Priority dateOct 24, 1950
Publication numberUS 2693591 A, US 2693591A, US-A-2693591, US2693591 A, US2693591A
InventorsMorse Frank P
Original AssigneeMorse Frank P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Light and control switching by and in combination with a lock
US 2693591 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 2, 1954 F P MORSE 2,693,591

LIGHT AND CO NTR OL SWITCHING BY AND IN COMBINATION WITH A LOCK Filed 001:. 24, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. Fkm/F P Mme Nov. 2, 1954 F. P. MORSE 2,593,591

LIGHT AND CONTROL SWITCHING BY AND IN COMBINATION WITH A LOCK Filed Oct. 24. 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 i 0 57 FIG n 4 G6 0 l 1 75 77 I FIGS INVEN TOR.

Nov. 2, 1954 F. P. MORSE 2,693,591

LIGHT AND CONTROL SWITCHING BY AND IN COMBINATION WITH A LOCK Filed Oct. 24. 1950 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 1 Fla I41 INVENTOR.

United States Patent LIGHT AND CONTROL SWITCHING BY AND IN COMBINATION WITH A LOCK Frank P. Morse, Boston, Mass. Application October 24, 1950, Serial No. 191,778 7 Claims. (Cl. 340275) The present invention relates to an electrical switching system in combination with door locks pertaining to economy in electrical illumination for rooms, apartments, hotels and other similar uses for turning off lights automatically when one departs from his room and turning them on when he unlocks the door as he enters the room and also to means for providing a signal tending to give some evidence as to the occupancy of the room at any time without trying the door or lock.

In the operation of a hotel, particularly medium sized to large hotels, the office is sometimes unaware of certain vacancies. This may happen in a number of ways. Usually however, if a room is vacant it will be locked from the outside or left unlocked. In connection with the present invention wherein the lights are turned out when the occupant leaves his room, means are also provided to show whether the room is locked from the inside, locked from the outside, entirely unlocked and also locked from both sides. This indication and control may be effected by electrical means operating through a low voltage source, such as a 24 volt system or through the usual lighting source and the indications may be given on the floor where the room is located or it may be wired to the ofiice where the room clerk can review the status of the room periodically day or night.

The present arrangement also avoids the necessity of going to each room and trying the lock as is customary in some hotels at night or when the chamber maids wish to clean, change linens, etc.

Further as to the other feature of the present invention it is common practice in hotels for guests to leave lights burning when they leave their rooms or apartments. This is not always done inadvertently, as people very frequently do not want to come into an unlighted room particularly at night or when it is getting dark. The same also applies to certain dwellings and apartments. It is customary under such conditions to leave one or more lights on when the occupant leaves the premises even through this will consume considerable electricity.

While it is common practice in automobiles, refrigerators, closets, stoves and other places, to provide a switch in the door jam so that the lights will be turned on when the door is opened, this is quite different from the present invention since the control must be obtained in connection with the lock and in such a way that when the door is locked from the outside and not from the inside, the lights will be turned off, while if locked from the inside, the lights will function in the usual manner.

In the present invention an arrangement is provided such that when a person unlocks the door from the outside, if any lights were left on when he went out, they will light up again when the door is unlocked, before it is even opened. When the door is shut as he enters the apartment, the light will remain on and stay on after he has locked the door from the inside.

The lights however in accordance with the present invention are fully controlled from the inside of the room so that they may be put out or on at any time of the day or night whether the door is locked or unlocked. The present invention further provides that where the door is locked from the inside the lighting circuit will be undisturbed and cannot be disturbed by attempting to lock the door from the outside. The principal advantage, however, gained by the present invention is that when a person goes out and locks the door from the outside, all of the lights inside of the room or apartment are put out except, if desired, for a Separate pilot lightwhieh 2,693,591 Patented Nov. 2, 1954 may be independent of the common lighting circuit. Further in the present invention it is not necessary in order to have the lights properly operate in the room to have the door either opened or shut, the operation being enirely controlled by the locking and unlocking of the oor.

The invention may be applied to various standard types of locks and in this connection is shown in the specification below in one embodiment as applied to a type known as the Lockwood lock which is opened and locked from the inside and out by means of the same key operating a single dead bolt. The invention however may equally well be applied to a split type of dead bolt or to a pair of dead bolts either mounted horizontally or one above the other in the door rail as will appear below. The principle of the invention may also be applied to other locking systems.

The invention will be more fully described in the specification set forth below when taken in connection with the drawings showing the embodiment of the invention in various forms in which:

Fi ure 1 shows a standard lock with the cover removed to which the present invention has been applied.

Filgure 2 shows a section taken on the line 22 of Figure Figure 3 shows a view of a portion of Figure 1 somewhat enlarged with the dead bolt in its furthest projection position.

Figure 4 shows a view somewhat similar to the arrangement of Fi ure l with the dead bolt in a locked position but not as fully extended as in Figure 3.

Figure 5 shows a detail in the door jam or wall illustrating somewhat diagrammatically a switch operable by the dead bolt in its extreme position.

Figure 6 shows an exploded view in perspective of details of the lock to which the invention is applied.

Figure 7 shows in perspective and somewhat diagrammatically the arrangement of a split dead bolt in the operation of the electric switches for controlling the lighting of the room.

Figure 8 shows a modification of a detail shown in Figure 7.

Figure 9 shows a still further modification employing a mercury type tube as a switch; and

Figure 10 shows a modification of the system for providing full information of the occupancy of a room.

In Figure 1 the lock is shown with the cover plate removed. The mechanism of the lock is mounted on a face plate 1 which forms with a continuous side wall 2 extending around the top, back and bottom of the lock and a forward plate 3 which sets flush into the edge of the door, a box containing the entire locking mechanism.

The drawing in Figure 1 shows a dead bolt 4 and a door latch or live bolt 5, the latter being operated by the turning of the knob of the door, not shown, the shaft of which extends through the square hole 6 of the cam 7 which operates to force backward the lever 8 at the contact edge 9 to force backward the bevelled latch 5 against the spring 11. This construction is common to many types of locks and forms no part of the present invention. A second lever 12 is also pivoted to a post 13 extending upward from the back wall 1. This lever has its upper end 14 as seen in Figure 1 held to the left by means of a spring 15 in a position to be engaged by a projecting boss 16 carried on the lever when that is turned counter-clockwise by turning the handle in a counter-clockwise direction. The lower end of the lever 12 is provided with an extending point 17, the purpose of which is to operate against the mechanism for forcing the dead bolt 4 inward when the door is locked from the outside as will be explained more in detail below.

In the cylinder-type lock described in Figures 1 to 6 inclusive, the same key is used both on the inside of the door and on the outside and for this purpose each side face of the lock has its own key barrel one of which is shown at 18 rojecting slightly from the inside face 1 of the lock. The key when inserted into the lock operates the eccentrically pivoted cam 19, Figure l. which is rotated in a clockwise direction from the position indicated in Figure l to force the dead bolt 4 outward for locking the door. The dead bolt 4, Figure 6, vis supported by means of a plate which is provided with a horizontally positioned slot 21 engaged by a rectangular boss 22 extending from the back plate 1. This rectangular slot and therectangular boss 22 together with the opening in the plate 3 through which the dead moves keeps the motioning of the dead bolt and its plate in a horizontal direction as it is moving out or in its operation.

The plate 20 carries a pin 23 shown in dotted position in Figure 6, which engages a slot 24 in a pivoted link 25 pivoted to the case by a post projecting into a center hole 26. The arm or bar 25 has at its other end a second slot 27 which engages a projecting pin 29 projecting from the lower face of the element 28. The plate or element 28 is shown more clearly in Figure 6. This comprises a flat section 30 in which there is formed a slot 31 which rides on a pin 32, Figure l projecting from the back of the case. Pivoted to the plate 28 is a top plate 33. This pivot is shown at 34 and the plate or lever 33 is tensioned by means of a leaf spring 35 against a projecting boss 36 projecting forwardly as seen in Figures 1 and 6 from the plate 28. The top plate 33 is forced by the leaf spring 35 against two V-shaped shoulders 37 and 38 which are spaced apart and into which opening a projecting finger 39 from the plate 33 extends. Both the back plate 28 and the forward member 33 are provided with rectangular openings which are in part aligned together. The opening 40 for the top plate 33 is larger than the opening 41 for the bottom plate 28. The top edge of these rectangular openings are aligned with one another with the edge 42 of the plate 33 provided with a shoulder 43 projecting from the top edge of the plate 33 into the opening. The plate 33 is pivoted so that the projection 43 may be raised to clear the post 44 as the bar or cam 19 of the barrel engages the V-shaped projections 37 and 38 and the member 39 as it is being turned.

When the end 45 of the cam 19 comes in contact with the member 39, the plate 33 is rotated counterclockwise as seen in Figure 1 so that the shoulder 43 will clear the post 44 and ultnnateiy come to rest on the other side of the post in which case the bolt 4 will have moved outward to its outward position and be held in that position until the key is again turned in the opposite direction.

The mechanism just described is normally the operation of locking and unlocking from the outside of the room and the cam 19 engages only the underplate 28 as viewed in Figure 1. A somewhat similar plate 46 lies directly over the plate 45. This plate 46 has at its forward end a fiange member 47 at right angles to the main portion of the plate 46 which flange 47 engages at its inner surface a fiat member 48 at the end of the section 30 of the plate 28. The plate 46 also has pivoted to it a second plate or lever member 49 which is similar in most respects to the member 33 pivoted on the plate 28. This member 49 is pivoted at 50 and ten sioned in its position by means of a leaf spring 51. The member 49 also has a downwardly projecting section or shoulder 52 positioned between two shoulders formed by the V-shaped elements 53 and 54 of the member 46. The pivoted member 49 is likewise as in the case of the member 33 provided with a window opening 55 whose top edge 56 has a downwardly projecting shoulder 57. The two plates are normally in one position held together so that the shoulders 57 and 43 align with each other. Essentially the plate 46 and the pivoted plate 49 mounted on it control the operation of the door from the outside. The two component elements, one comprising the elements 28 and 33 and the other comprising the elements 46 and 49 are interlocked. This is accomplished by means of the finger 58 projecting from the top of the pivoted plate 33 and the notch 59 projecting from the top of the pivoted plate 30. When the elements are lined up as indicated in Figure l, the members 58 and 59 interlock as indicated in that figtire. The top plate of the two plates 46 also has an ear 60 projecting from the topedge of the top plate 46 and this ear is formed with a hole 61 to receive the post 62 of the member 63. The member 63 travels back and forth with the movement of the plate 46 and it has a projecting finger 64 which acts to limit the motion of operation of unlocking when the door has. been locked 4 from the inside. In this position the door may not be unlocked from the outside after it has been locked from the inside. The member 64 comes in contact with the member 58 and prevents the movement of the shoulder 43 around the post 44.

In the type of lock shown in Figures 1 to 6, the door may always be unlocked from the inside even if locked from the outside. In the case where the door is locked from the outside, merely turning the handle of the door knob will unlock the door. This is accomplished through the action of the lever 12. Turning the door knob will bring the post 16 against the shoulder 14 of the lever 12 moving it in a clockwise direction as positioned in Figure 1 and bring the projecting point 17 against the curved surface 65 of the plate 33 and between this curved surface and the V-shaped shoulder 38 of the plate 28 causing the plate 33 to be raised at the back so that the plates will be moved in a direction to the right as viewed in Figure 6 and Figure 3, thereby moving the bolt 4 into the door.

The mechanism which has been described above at length is a standard lock type mechanism. Its details are somewhat complicated and have been dwelt upon at length in order that the modification which follows may be better understood.

In this mechanism which has been described, the lock is shown looking at the barrel or cylinder member which operates with a key at the outside. The key when rotated in a clockwise direction moves the plate 28, Figures 1 and 6, to the right, raises the plate 33 on its pivot so that the shoulder 43 clears the post 44 and the finger 58 clears the notch 59, and comes down to the left side of the post 44. Such motion will rotate the link 25 and force the dead bolt 4 to move to the left in Figure 1 and therefore outward. This motion, however, will have no effect on the position of the plate 46 and its pivoted plateor lever 49. This will only be operated by the lock on the inside when it is turned. Turning the key on the inside will first bring the eccentric cam of the key barrel up against the projection 52 thereby raising the plate 49 so that the shoulder 57 will clear the post 44. Since the plate 49 bears against the finger 58 of the bottom pivoted plate 33, the shoulder 43 will also be raised to clear the post 44. At the same time, the eccentric lever of the key barrel will come against the shoulder 54 and move both the elements 46 and its plate 49 to the right as viewed in the position shown in Figure 6. The flange 47 extending over the end section 48 will move the whole bottom mechanism comprising the plate 28 and its pivoted member 33 also to the right as viewed in Figure 6 and this too will move the bolt 4 to the left and lock theidoor. In this position the door cannot be unlocked by turning the cam lever 19 of the outside cylinder. The cam lever of the outside cylinder will raise the shoulder 43 and the projection 58 but movement 'of the elements 28 and 33 to the right as viewed in Figure l or Figure 6 will bring the shoulder 57 against the post 44 and therefore prevent further movement. Unlocking of the door when once locked from the insidef ca%.only be accomplished by a master key which"move's1t {er-pin or post 66 outwardly along the eccentric axis of the cam 19 so as to operate against the projection 52 of the pivoted plate '49.

In the locking mechanism shown therefore in Figures 1 to 6, the door will be locked and unlocked from the inside with the same throw of the bolt.

In the consttruction as further devised the mechanism will throw the dead bolt further outward when locked from the outside than when locked from the inside and this is accomplished in such a way that manipulation of the key in either direction from the outside will not change this condition.

For this purpose ,there is mounted on the back plate 1 for rotation, a dyimd 6,7 which has projecting from its surface a V-shape' -fejection 68 coaxially aligned with the cylinder. The cylinder is positioned adjacent the fiat section 30 of'the plate 28 which flat sectionis provided with a V-shaped recess 69- in which the V- shaped projection 68 is adapted to engage as the cylinder 67 is rotated. At the top offthe cylin 7,67 thereis mounted a flat bar 70 whichflexte'tids 53''? the hat section 71 of the plate 46 from which a pin"72,:projectsjwhich is in line, when moved horizontally as shown in'Fig' tires 1 and 3 to engage the end of the bar 70. When the door is locked from the outside only the plate 28 and the top plate 33 pivoted to it, are moved to the right as viewed in Figures 1 and 3. The upper plate element 46 and its top pivoted plate 49 remain stationary during this action. It will be evident, therefore, that the cylinder 67 is not turned and remains as indicated in Figures l and 3.

When however the lock is turned from the inside, both the bottom sets of plates 28 and 33 and the top sets of plates 46 and 49 are moved to the right as viewed in Figures 1, 3 and 4 to lock the door. During this action the pin 72 engages the bar 70 and turns the cylinder 67 until the projection 68 engages in the recess 69 in the flat surface 30 of the plate 28. This brings the stop 73 on the cylinder 67 against the fixed stop 74 on the back plate 1 so that the dead bolt is prevented from going to its out-most position as it does when locked from the outside. The full line position in Figure 4 shows this arrangement. Figures 1 and 4 show the post 44 with a half top section 74. By cutting the post 44 partly away at the top, the shoulder 57 of the top plate pivoted element 49 may snap into its normal. position when the dead bolt is fixed in the full line position shown in Figure 4 and this will prevent movement of the locking mechanism to the left as viewed in Figures 1 and 4 by insertion and turning the lock from the outside.

When a person leaves the room and locks the door from the outside, the dead bolt 4 is moved in the further position shown by the dotted line of the dead bolt of Figure 4 and in this position is designed to operate the electrical circuit to the lights in the room to turn them off. The dead bolt position when the door is locked from the outside is shown in full in Figure 5. Here the dead bolt comes up against a switch button 75 which at the end of an insulated post 76 carries a wiping contact 77 which wipes over the plate 78 of one circuit terrninal 79. The other terminal is indicated at 80. The circuit is closed when the push button 75 has been moved by the spring 81 to bring the contact element 77 in electrical contact with the inverted L-shaped conductive element 82. Under these conditions a circuit is completed between the terminals 79 and 80 and the lights in the room will remain on if they have been turned to an on position. When however the bolt 4 forces the push button 75 to the left as seen in Figure 5, the circuit is broken and the lights are turned out. This occurs only when the door is locked from the outside. When the door is unlocked or locked from the inside, nothing happens. 1

A modification of the present construction is shown in Figure 7 in which also a diagrammatic arrangement of the room lights in the electrical circuit are also indicated. In Figure 7, two dead bolts 83 and 84 are shown side by side extending up and down with respect to the rail 85 of the door 86. As shown in the figure, the bolt 83 is operated from the outside by the cylinder lock 87 and the bolt 84 is locked from the inside. Both bolts are shown in their extended position. The bolt 84 is shown operating the projecting arm 88 of the switch 89. The switch 89 is shown somewhat diagrammatically and any other suitable type of switch may be substituted for it. The arm 88 of the switch is a part of the pivoted lever 90 tensioned by the spring 91 so that the bolt 83 acts against the action of the spring at all times. The lower end of the lever 90 operates a bell crank lever 92 which carries one of the pair of contacts 93 and 94 by which the light circuit is opened and closed. When the bolt is in its extended position as shown in Figure 7, the contacts 93 and 94 are apart and the lighting circuit 95 is opened so that none of the lights 96, 96, etc., will carry current. If desired a pilot light 97 may be kept on or off at all times in the room or apartment as the case may be. This light would be connected to the supply 98 in the position before the switch 89 is in circuit and this light may be controlled by an independent switch 99. Provision is made in the arrangement shown in Figure 7 so that if the door should be locked from the outside the lights in the inside of the room may still be turned on provided the door is locked also from the inside. This arrangement finds its usefulness in party doors in apartments. In this case a switch 100 in the Wall frame work is in position to be closed when the bolt 84 is extended. Such a switch is shown diagrammatically and maintains the switch 89 shorted at all times when the bolt 84 is in its extended position. The switch 100 is connected across the switch 89 by means of the conductors 101 and 102. Figure 7'shows the two dead bolts side by side on a horizontal alignment.

Figure 7 also provides a low voltage system for indicating in connection with the position of the lock, complete information about the occupancy of the room. Two indicators 130 and 131 are provided for each room, either positioned on the floor where the room is, or in the ofiice. The indicators may be arranged in suitable banks each bearing the number of the room. The illustration in Figure 7 and also in Figure 10, which will be explained later, shows only one room, but the circuit and principles are the same for many rooms. The switch also makes a further circuit closure between the element 132 and 133 in the position shown in Figure 7 when the door is locked from the inside. Similarly the switch 89 makes a further circuit closure between the elements 134 and 135 when the outside bolt 83 is in the unlocked position or broadly when the door is locked from the outside.

These contacts operate over the lines 136, 137 and 138 through a supply source 139 which may be a low voltage for example, 24 volts the indicators 130 and 131. When the circuits are closed the flags 140 and 141 are up and when open, are down. If therefore the flags 140 and 141 are both up, the door is locked from the inside only and the room presumably would be occupied. If flag 140 is down and the flag 141 is up, the door is unlocked. This may signify that the room is vacant if it remains unlocked all night for instance or that the occupant negligently forgot to lock the room. If flag 140 is down and 141 is up, the door is locked from the outside only, and if this condition should occur all night, it would indicate that the room had been unoccupied. Certain conditions as these would cause the hotel employees to investigate to see whether the room was vacated permanently or temporarily. It is evident therefore that with two indicators, all conditions regarding the occupancy or unoccupancy of the room may be indicated.

Figure 8 shows two dead bolts 103 and 104, side by side in vertical alignment. In this case the same switch arrangement and circuit may be used as in Figure 7, the bolt 103 operating the switch circuit 105 and the switch 106 to open the electrical supply when the door is locked from the outside. The bolt 104 may be operated similarly as the bolt 84 in Figure 7.

Figure 9 shows in fragmentary detail two horizontally aligned dead bolts 107 and 108, the outer bolt 107 operating a mercury switch 109 for controlling the breaking of the circuit to the lights across the conductors 110 and 111. A mercury switch or tube switch is highly useful in the arrangement of the present invention since it has a larger current capacity and will be free from any difiiculties due to arcing. However it will be noted that the ordinary type of switches approved by the Underwriters Laboratories may be used in the present invention and these are of such a size that the switch controlling the lights for a room or apartment may readily be mounted on a door jam without any difficulty whatsoever.

In the arrangement shown in Figure 10, the dead bolt 4 operating as in Figures 1 to 6 in its furthermost extended position, opens both the first switch and the second switch 121 indicating that the door is locked from the outside by the release of both indicators 122 and 123 by opening respectively the current supply to the electromagnets 124 and 125. If the dead bolt does not extend to its full distance, the indicator 122 only will operate showing the door is locked from the inside. If the door is unlocked, neither indicator 122 nor 123 will be operated indicating the door is unlocked. This information, as has been explained, is highly desirable in hotels. At night it often happens that people go to sleep and leave their doors open. When the room supposedly occupied is vacant, this is shown by a continued condition of being locked from the outside or being unlocked. These indications may be produced in a downstairs office or on the floor where the room is situated and is of great aid in running large hotels.

The arrangement of Figure 10 may also be made to operate with separate circuits for the indicators on a low voltage system. The arrangement of Figure 10 is applicable to the mechanism of Figure 6 and may also be applied to a split dead bolt as in Figures 7 and 8. Various types of indicators may be used as for instance,

lights, flags, numbers and also intermittent audible signals if desired.

Having now described my invention, I claim:

1. In combination with a door and'door frame of a room, apartment or the like, a lock controlled switching means mounted in a recess in the door jamb facing the edge of the door, locking means carried by said door having a dead bolt adapted to engage in said recess for locking said door, said locking means including a pair of parallel operable plate elements with a link connected from the dead bolt to one of the same for moving said dead bolt in the same parallel direction, means connecting the second plate to the first whereby operation of the second plate will move the first the same amount but permit the first plate to be moved independently, means associated with operation of the lock from one side for moving the first plate only and extending the dead bolt to its further position and means associated with the second plate for moving the dead bolt to a limited position when both plates are operated together said lock controlled switching means having different operations depending upon whether said dead bolt is in its further position or its limited position.

2. In combination witha door and door frame of a room, apartment or the like, a lock controlled switching means mounted in a recess in the door jamb facing the edge of the door, locking means carried by said door having a dead bolt adapted to engage in said recess for locking said door, said locking means including a pair of parallel operable plate elements with a link connected from the dead bolt to one of the same for moving said dead bolt in the same parallel direction, means connecting the second plate to the first whereby operation of the second plate will move the first the same amount but permit thefirst plate to be moved independently, means associated with operation of the lock from one side for moving the first plate only and extending the dead bolt to its further position and means associated with the second plate for moving the dead bolt to a limited position when both plates are operated together including a limited stop' operable by the second plate to lock the first plate from obtaining further outward motion of the dead bolt said lo'ck controlled switching means having different operations depending upon whether said dead bolt is in its further position or its limited position.

3. In combination with a door and door frame of a room, apartment or the like, a lock controlled switching means mounted in the door jamb having a switch operating element positioned in the path of the dead bolt of the door, means for operating said dead bolt from the outside and inside for locking and unlocking said door including means for limiting the magnitude of extension of the dead boltwhen operated from the inside such that it will not operate said switch element and when operated from the outside will operate said switch element.

4. In combination with a door and door frame of' a room, apartment, or the like, a lock controlled switching means mounted in the door jamb having a switch operating element positioned in the path of the dead bolt of the door, means for operating said dead bolt from the outside and inside for locking and unlocking said door including means for extending said dead bolt from the outside to operate said switch and means preventing the extension from the outside when the dead bolt has been extended from the inside.

5. In combination with a door and door jamb having a lock with a dead bolt adapted to be extended from the door into a recess in the door jamb, means iricluded in the locking mechanism for extending said bolt further into said recess when locked from the outside than from the inside, two independent indicators, means for operating said two independent indicators when the bolt is in said further extended position and only one when said bolt is in said recess but not in its further position whereby definite indications are obtained showing whether the door is unlocked, locked from the outside or locked from the inside.

6. In combination, means for locking 2. door from the outside, means for locking said door from the inside, electrical means controlled by said locking means including means for indicating when the door is unlocked, means for indicating when it is locked from the outside, anid means for indicating when it is locked from the ins1 e.

7. In combination with means for locking a door from the outside, means for locking said door from the inside, electrical means controlled by said locking means including means for indicating when-the door is unlocked, means for indicating when it is locked from the outside, means for indicating when it is locked from the inside, and means for indicating when it is locked from both sides.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 880,168 Shannon et al Feb. 25, 1908 1,160,496 Casper Nov. 16, 1915 1,170,032 Williams Feb. 1, 1916 1,381,021 Schlote June 7, 1921 1,702,483 Phelps Feb. 19, 1929 1,783,633 Stewart Dec. 2, 1930 2,266,086 Schlage Dec. 16, 1941 2,286,463 Chaskin June 16, 1942 2,301,290 Knight Nov. 10, 1942 2,427,040 Billman Sept. 9, 1947 2,615,083 Krueger Oct. 21, 1952

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3196293 *May 16, 1962Jul 20, 1965Howard Eugene LesterCombination door latch light switch system
US4058740 *Mar 12, 1975Nov 15, 1977Lok-A-Wat, Inc.Entry-controlled energy system
US8160749Dec 22, 2008Apr 17, 2012David DonaldsonEnergy conservation system
Classifications
U.S. Classification70/134, 70/432, 200/61.68
International ClassificationE05B59/00, E05B17/22, E05B17/00, E05B59/04
Cooperative ClassificationE05B17/22
European ClassificationE05B17/22