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Publication numberUS2693765 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 9, 1954
Filing dateSep 22, 1951
Priority dateSep 22, 1951
Publication numberUS 2693765 A, US 2693765A, US-A-2693765, US2693765 A, US2693765A
InventorsPetri Jan Evert
Original AssigneeAmerican Optical Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid pump and method of making the same
US 2693765 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1954 J. E. PETRI FLUID PUMP AND METHOD OF' MAKING THE SAME 2 SheeLs-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 22, 1951 INVENTOR JAN E PE.TR\

1954 J. E. PETRI FLUID PUMP AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FiledSept. 22, 1951 INVENTOR E, Pam

JAN

United States Patent M FLUID PUB/[P AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Jan Evert Petri, Pomfret, Conn., assignor to American Optical Company, Southhridge, Mass, a voluntary association of Massachusetts Application September 22, 1951, Serial No. 247,830 7 Claims. (Cl. 103149) This invention relates to pumping apparatus and has particular reference to the provision of a novel and simple device which may be readily assembled with a continuous section of flexible tubing for pumping fluid through said tubing.

A principal object of the invention is to provide a simple and inexpensive pumping device which may be attached with ease to a continuous section of a flexible tube whereby said device, when operated, will function cooperatively with the tube in a positive and an exceptionally free operable manner for causing an enforced flow of a fluid through said tube while compensating for non-uniformity as to resiliency, wall thickness or other irregularities which might be present in the tube.

Another object is to provide a device of the above character with a circular channel having a restricted mouth portion through which the flexible tube may be positioned and more positively held within said channel and having a rotatable disk member carried by a manually operable lever in such manner that the peripheral edge of the disk will extend through said restricted mouth portion into engagement with the tube to successively and progressively compress contiguous areas of the tube against the bottom surface of the channel to cause an enforced flow of a fluid through said tube when the lever is rotated and being so constructed as to permit adjustment of said disk, without disconnection of the device from the flexible tube, to a position which will permit gravital flow of the fluid through the tube.

A further object is to provide a device of the above character having means for controlling the direction of rotation of disk member and, therefore, the direction of pumping of the fluid through the tube.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of the device embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view of said device;

Fig. 3 is a view generally similar to Fig. 1 illustrating the position of the disk member when it is desired to permit gravital flow of fluid through said device;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken as on line 44 of Fig. 3 and looking in the direction indicated by the arrows;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken as on line 55 of Fig. l and looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken .as on line 66 of Fig. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows; and

Fig. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on line 7--7 of Fig. 1 and looking in the direction indicated by the arrows.

Although the device embodying the present invention is designed for various different uses, its primary purpose is for use in hospitals, first-aid stations, and the like where enforced transfusions and infusions of blood are required. It has been a common practice in providing as enforced transfusion to employ one of three diflierent methods as follows:

A. Cause the blood to flow through the tube by compressing the tube between the two fingers and sliding the fingers along the tube;

B. By using an apparatus embodying compressed oxygen for forcing the blood through the tube from a suitable container; and

C. By manual injection by means of a syringe.

All of the above methods have proven to be quite unsatisfactory and, in some instances, extremely dangerous.

The present invention relates particularly to overcoming the difliculties of the prior art methods by providing a device that may be used with a short length of rubber tubing incorporated in a standard transfusion set by simply threading a section of the tubing into the device and into cooperative relation with means which may be freely manipulated for forcing the blood through the tube at a controlled rate.

Among the several advantages of the present device is that it does not require the severing of the tube for assembly therewith and thereby overcomes any danger of dirt, dust, etc. gaining access to the interior of the tube and in no way effects the sterile condition which must be maintained during such transfusions.

Referring to the drawings wherein there is illustrated a preferred embodiment of the invention, the numeral 10 designates a housing having a circular channel 11 formed in a side surface thereof. The said housing 10, adjacent the channel 11, is recessed to receive an annular member 12 having its outer edge portion 13 overlying the channel to provide a restricted mouth portion 14, see Figs. 5 and 6. The annular member 12 is secured to the housing 10 by screws or other suitable means 15. A lever 16, formed of resilient blade spring material, is pivotally connected at 17 concentrically with the channel 11 and is provided with suitable roller bearings 18 and 19 for ease of rotary movement thereof. The said lever is provided with a hand-grip member 20 by means of which it may be manually rotated. Adjacent the outer end of the lever 16, there is supported a disk 21 mounted on a pivot 22 carried by a block 23. The block 23 is connected with the lever 16 by rivets or other suitable connection means 24. The disk 21 is provided with a convexly curved peripheral edge positioned to extend inwardly of the channel 11 through the mouth portion 14 and is adapted to engage and compress a tubular member 25 formed of resilient material such as rubber, synthetic rubber or the like located in said channel. The tube is adapted to be positioned internally of the channel 11 by forcing it inwardly through the restricted mouth portion 14 and is normally held therein by the lip 13.

The outer side wall of the channel 11 is cut away, as illustrated at 26, to permit the sections 27 and 28 of the tube 25 to be turned outwardly therethrough after the tube has been looped inwardly of the said channel 11. The housing 10, adjacent the cut away wall portion .26, is provided with a bracket 29 secured thereto by screws or other suitable connecting means 30. The bracket is provided with a pair of spaced openings having communicating slotted portions 31 and 32 for receiving the respective sections 27 and 28 and for aiding in retaining the portion of the tube positioned within the channel against creeping during the operation of the device. The spaced openings are of a diameter less than the diameter of the tubing and maintain a slight gripping action thereon during the use of the device. If the related dimensional characteristics of the channel and tubing are so controlled that the diameter of the tube is slightly greater than that of the width of the channel 11, the inherent tendency for the tube to return to its initial set after stretching will cause said-tube and inner wall of the channel to have frictional contact with each other. In most instances, this frictional contact will be suflicient to overcome any tendency of the disc 21 to cause the tube to creep when the device is operated. However, with a view to more positive assurance against such creeping, particularly in instances when the tube 25 might be slightly smaller in diameter than the inner dimension of the channel or slightly less than the optimum diameter of tubing which is normally used, the bottom surface of the channel 11 is provided with serrations 11a or radial grooves thereby forming'an irregular surface having, in effect, a plurality of projections, By pressing the tubing against the serrations 11a, the friction created between the serrations and the tube will be substantially greater than the friction between the disk 21 and the tube thereby causing the tube to be retained in its original position at the point of, compression.

When the lever 16 is rotated in a clockwise direction about its pivot 17, the disk 21 will compress the tube 25, as illustrated best in Fig. 6, and will cause blood or other fluid drawn from a source or origin to be drawn inwardly of the tube, as illustrated 'by the arrow 33, and forced outwardly of the opposed end thereof, as illustrated by the arrow 34. This is in response to the successive and progressive compression of contiguous areas of the tube by the disk 21 against the bottom of the channel 11. Continuous rotary movement 'of the disk in a clockwise direction will, therefore, cause a continuous pumping action to take place and the speed of flow may be controlled by the speed of rotation of the lever 16. Due to the fact that the lever 16 is made :in the form of a resilient blade spring whereby the d sk 21 will be resiliently urged in compressing relation with the tube 25, any slight variations in the texture 'of the Y tube such -as hard spots or dimensional changes will be readily compensated for by said resiliency and a smooth freely operable pumping action is obtained.

It is to be noted that when the disk '21 is located in a-position, such as shown in Fig. -1, "that'th'etube 25 will be compressed and will not permit a free flowing of blood or other liquid therethrough. V

The diameter of the disk 21 'and 'the distance between the sections 27 and 28 of the tube which extend outwardly of the cut away section 26 'of the outer wall portion -of the housing are so controlled that when the disk 21 is located between said sections, as illustrated in .Fig. 3, free gravital flow of the liquid through the tube 25 is permitted. This arrangement, therefore, permits instantaneous pumping, if desired, and also permits free gravital flow of a liquid "through the tube without the necessity of detaching the device from the tube.

To insure against improper direction of 'flowduring the pumping, the lever 16, on the side thereof opposed to the hand-grip member 20, extends outwardly of the pivot 17 and is provided with a block 35 which "is secured thereto by screwsor'other suitable means 36. The block 35, as-shown in Fig. '7, is provided with-an angled undersurfa'ee 37 which is adaptedto engage and compress a resiliently supported stop pin 38 to enable the lever i -16 to be rotated in the proper pumping direction. This block 35, however, when the lever 16 is rotated -in "the opposite direction, will engage andinterlock with the stop pin and will prevent the lever from being rotated in said direction and'thereby render the pump inoperative when said lever is moved in a direction opposite from that of the desired pumping direction. 7

The resiliently supported stop pin "38 has an enlarged flange 39 thereon which is mounted within a hollow bore 40 formed in the housing 10 and has its 'upper portion slidably mounted within-an opening in -a threaded ,nutlike member 41 which -is threaded inwardly of a'suitable threaded area 42'formed internally of'the bore 40. Surrounding the 'pin 38 beneath the flange -39 and internally of the bore 40 is a coil spring 4-3: which is adapted to 'c'on'sta'ntly urge the pin 38 ina direction outwardly-of the 'openingin the nut-like'member41. "The housing m, on the side thereof opposite the lever 16, is provided with an integral boss 44 havinga hollow bore adapted to receivethe stem 45 of a clamp 46 by means of which the pump may be connected to a suitablesupporting stand or other upright member -47. The stem 45 is secured to the boss 44 by 1 means of a suitable -'-set screw or the like 48 -'and the clamp member 46 is provided with -a wingscrew '49 whereby the=saidclamp -'may be secured to'the stand or upright 47 at any'suitableheight.

In operation, the device is coupled with'the 'tube 25 by stretching a section-of the tube and forcing it through the restricted mouth portion -14 inwardly of the channel -11. This procedure is accomplished by first threading the section 27 of the tube inwardly of the-opening in the br'a'cket29 through the slot 31 and thence drawing the tube through the cut away portion 26 *o'fthe side wall of the housing 10. The tube is continuously "stretched and forced inwardly of the channel until a continuous loop is formed "throughout thechannel and 'the opposed section of the tube 28 -is drawn outwardly of the cut away area 26 and threadedinwardly 'of the opposite opening of the bracket through the slot 32. The fact that the openings inthe bracket which receive the two sections 27 and 28 are of a diameter slightly less than the diameter of the tubing, the inherent tendency of .the material of the tube to .return to .its initial :set after-stretching will cause therespective portions of 'the bracket having the openings therein to have azgripping action with said respective :sec'tions.

It is particularly pointed out that while it has been described that the pumping results from the continuous and progressive compression of the tube in the direction of rotary movement of the disk 21, the tube, immediately following the compressing must return to its initial set in order to create a sucking action whereby the fluid or blood will be drawn from the source of origin inwardly of the tube, as indicated by the arrow 33 and, simultaneous to this function, the progressive compressing of the tube will force the blood, previously drawn into the tube, outwardly of the opposed end thereof, as indicated by the arrow 34. Therefore, the pumping action is definitely a cooperative function of the compressing action of the rotary disk 21 and the resiliency of the tube.

Due .to the fact that as the disk .21 .is rotated-it tends to continually force the tube 25 in a direction inwardly of the channel 11, there is little, if .any, danger of the tube being displaced from the channel during the use of the device. The fact that the tube compressing force ,on the disk is paralleland offset with respect to the axis of rotation of the lever 16 also greatly obviates mechanical frictionon the pivot and results .in a free and smooth functionlng device. This is due also to the fact that suitable ball bearings are provided for permitting free pivotal movement of the lever 16 and that the spring lever 16 will automatically compensate for variations of thickness and other irregularities in the resilient tube. The tens'ion of the blade spring lever 16 .is such that it will completely compress the tube 25 as the disk 21 is rotated thereby assuring a positive pumping action. To insure that only a compressing action takes place as the disk is rotated the base of the channel 11 is curved substantially to the same cross-sectional shape as the tube.

The lip 13 .forming the restricted mouth of the channel also aids in retaining the looped ,-portion of the tube internally of said channel.

'By varying the speed of rotation of the disk, the amount of blood delivered to .thepatient and the pressure thereof during said delivery may be controlled.

Although the pump has been particularly described as being adaptable to transfusions or infusions, it is quite apparent that it might be put to .several other uses Where a fluid pump is required and also where sterile conditions must be maintained.

From the foregoing description, it will be seen that simple, efiicient and economical means have been provided for accomplishing all the objects and advantages of .the invention. It will be apparent, however, that many changes may be made in the details of construction and arrangement ofparts shown and described without departing from the spirit of the invention asexpressed in the accompanying claims. Therefore, it is to be understood that all matter set forth -or shownin :the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not :in allim'itin'g sense.

Having described my invention 1 claim:

1. .A pumpingapparatus for use with flexible tubing to move-fluid therethrough by successively and progressively compressing said tubing in a direction longitudinallyofa section thereof comprising a base having .a circular channel in a side .surface thereo'f provided with :an open mouth facing in a direction paralleling the axis about which the channel is defined and having -a passageway extending through the wall of the :channel and communicating with said channel whereby a looped section of said tubing may be positioned in said channel with the ends of the looped section extending outwardly of the passageway, said base having a lever rotatably connected thereto in concentric relation with the .axis about which said circular channelis defined, a'ndtadisk rotatably=connected with the lever, its axis of-rotationvbeing.substantially perpendicular't'o the axisof rotation'for the lever, andsaid disk being spaced 'fromthe :aXis of rotation of thelever whereby 'theperipheral edge of the disk'will 'extend within the channel and will engage the tubing of resilient material when .in position in .said channel, the peripheral edge of said disk being convexly curved and having a thickness less than that of the width .of the channel whereby the tubing will be successively-and ;prog-ressive'ly.compressedwith a minimum amount of creep as the lever is rotated and a smooth freely operating purnpingaction may be obtained;

2. A pumping apparatus for use with flexible tubing .to *move fluid therethrough by successively and progressively compressing said tubing in a direction longitudinally of a section thereof comprising a base having a tubing receiving circular channel formed in a side surface thereof, said channel having a semi-circular bottom and an overlying lip portion forming a restricted mouth portion to the channel that is substantially narrower than the diameter of the tubing with which the apparatus is intended to be used, said restricted mouth portion of the channel facing in a direction paralleling the axis about which the circular channel is defined, said base having a passageway in the outer edge wall thereof communicating with the channel, said channel being adapted to receive a looped section of said flexible tubing with the opposed ends of said looped section extending outwardly of the passageway, a lever rotatably connected with the base in concentric relation with said axis about which the channel is defined, and a disk rotatably connected with said lever with its longitudinal axis of rotation being substantially perpendicular with respect to the longitudinal axis of rotation for the lever, said disk being so supported on the lever from the axis about which the lever rotates as to have its peripheral edge extend through the restricted mouth portion into the channel whereby the said disk will engage the looped section of the resilient tubing when positioned in said channel and will cause successive and progressive portions of said tubing to be compressed as the lever is rotated.

3. A pumping apparatus for use with flexible tubing to move fluid therethrough by successively and progressively compressing said tubing in a direction longitudinally of a section thereof comprising a base having a circular channel formed in a side surface thereof to receive a looped section of said tubing, the bottom surface of said channel being curved substantially to the curvature of the contour of said tubing when positioned internally of said channel and the mouth of said channel facing in a direction paralleling the axis about which the circular channel is defined, an annular member secured to the base with its outer edge portion overlying said mouth of the channel so as to form a restricted mouth portion communicating with said channel, said channel being of a width less than the cross-sectional dimension of the section of said resilient tubing to be positioned therein, a lever rotatably connected with the base in concentric relation with said axis about which the channel is defined, and a disk rotatably connected with the lever with its axis in normal relation with the axis of rotation for the lever whereby the peripheral edge of said disk will extend through said restricted mouth portion internally of the channel and, when the lever I is rotated, it will engage and successively and progressively compress the section of resilient tubing in said channel.

4. A pumping apparatus for use with flexible tubing to move fluids therethrough by successively and progressively compressing said tubing in a direction longitudinally of a section thereof comprising a base having a circular channel formed in a side surface thereof to receive a section of said tubing, the bottom surface of said channel being curved substantially to the contour of said section of tubing when positioned internally of said channel and its mouth facing in a direction paralleling the axis about which the channel is defined, an annular member secured to the base with its outer edge portion overlying the said mouth of the channel so as to form a restricted mouth portion communicating with said channel, said channel being of a width less than the cross-sectional dimension of the section of resilient tubing to be positioned therein, a lever rotatably connected with the base in concentric relation with said axis about which the channel is defined and a disk rotatably connected with the lever with its axis in normal relation with the axis of rotation of the lever whereby the peripheral edge of said disk will extend internally of the channel and, when the lever is rotated, it will engage and successively and progressively compress the section of resilient tubing in said channel, said lever being formed of resilient blade spring material to hold tle disk under resilient tension during the rotation there- 0 5. A pumping apparatus for use with flexible tubing to move fluid therethrough by successively and progressively compressing said tubing in a direction longitudinally of a section thereof comprising a base having a circular channel in a side surface thereof and having a passageway extending through the wall of the channel and communicating with said channel whereby a looped section of said tubing may be positioned in said channel with its ends extending outwardly of the passageway, said channel having its mouth facing in a direction paralleling the axis about which the channel is defined, and a lever rotatably connected to said base in concentric relation with said axis about which the circular channel is defined, and a disk rotatably connected with the lever with its axis being substantially perpendicular to the axis of rotation of the lever whereby the peripheral edge of the disk will extend within the channel and will engage and successively and progressively compress the tubing when the lever is rotated, said lever being formed of resilient blade spring material to hold the disk under resilient tension during the rotation thereof whereby slight variations in the texture of the tubing such as hard spots and dimensional changes will be readily compensated for and a smooth freely operable pumping action may be obtained.

6. A pumping apparatus for use with flexible tubing to move fluids therethrough by successively and progressively compressing said tubing in a direction longitudinally of a section thereof comprising a base having a circumferential groove therein and a passageway communicating with said groove whereby a looped section of said tubing may be positioned internally of the groove with the opposed ends thereof extending outwardly of the passageway, the mouth of said groove facing in a direction paralleling the axis about which the groove is defined, a resilient lever rotatably connected with the base in concentric relation with said axis about which the groove is defined, a disk connected with said lever for rotation about an axis disposed normal to said axis of rotation of the lever and having its edge extending within the groove to engage the looped section of resilient tubing when positioned therein and to successively and progressively compress said looped section when the lever is rotated, and a handle on said lever adjacent the connection of the disk therewith, the compressing force of the disk on the tubing being substantially parallel and offset with respect to the axis about which the lever is gotzlaltei whereby a smooth freely pumping action may 7. A pumping apparatus for use with flexible tubing to move fluids therethrough by successively and progressively compressing said tubing in a direction longitudinally of a section thereof comprising a base having a circumferential groove therein with its mouth facing in a direction paralleling the axis about which the groove is defined and a passageway communicating with said groove through which a looped section of said flexible tubing may be positioned internally of the groove and with the opposed ends of said looped section extending through said passageway, a lever rotatably connected with the base in concentric relation with the groove, a disk rotatably connected with said lever for movement in a circumferential path about an axis disposed approximately normal to said axis about which the groove is defined and having its edge extending within the groove to engage the looped section of the tubing when positioned therein so as to successively and progressively compress said looped section when the lever is rotated, the tubing being retained against substantial creeping in said groove during said successive and progressive compressing thereof, and means for so supporting said opposed ends of the looped section of the tubing as to provide a space along the path of the disk in the groove where substantially no compressing action will be imparted to said tubing by said disk and so permit uninterrupted flow of fluid through the tubing when the disk is located in said space.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 425,015 Allen Apr. 8, 1890 922,205 Still May 18, 1909 2,018,998 De Bakey Oct. 29, 1935 2,102,523 Ferrara Dec. 14, 1937 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 11,924 France Aug. 4, 1840

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US425015 *Nov 11, 1889Apr 8, 1890 Instrument for the transfusion of blood
US922205 *Jan 19, 1909May 18, 1909Milan StillPump.
US2018998 *May 11, 1934Oct 29, 1935George D LillySurgical pump
US2102523 *Mar 23, 1936Dec 14, 1937Deen William EBlood transfusion machine
FR11924E * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3502034 *Aug 20, 1968Mar 24, 1970Extracorporeal Med SpecRoller pump heads
US4406440 *Sep 15, 1981Sep 27, 1983Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Flow regulating device
US5057081 *Jun 15, 1990Oct 15, 1991Sherwood Medical CompanyPeristaltic infusion device
US5127908 *Jun 21, 1991Jul 7, 1992Sherwood Medical CompanyPeristaltic infusion device
US5133650 *Mar 1, 1991Jul 28, 1992Sherwood Medical CompanyInfusion device rotor shield
US5147312 *Jun 25, 1991Sep 15, 1992Sherwood Medical CompanyPeristaltic infusion device drip chamber yoke
US5158528 *Mar 27, 1991Oct 27, 1992Sherwood Medical CompanyPeristaltic infusion device and charger unit
US5181842 *Mar 1, 1991Jan 26, 1993Sherwood Medical CompanyPeristaltic infusion device
EP0344640A1 *May 26, 1989Dec 6, 1989Giuseppe ValisiPeristaltic pump provided with means to contain and guide the flexible suction and delivery pipe within its seat
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/476
International ClassificationF04B43/12
Cooperative ClassificationF04B43/1269
European ClassificationF04B43/12G4