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Publication numberUS2693927 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 9, 1954
Filing dateSep 5, 1952
Priority dateSep 5, 1952
Publication numberUS 2693927 A, US 2693927A, US-A-2693927, US2693927 A, US2693927A
InventorsGardner Byron T
Original AssigneeGardner Byron T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Curtain rod bracket
US 2693927 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 9, 1954 B,y T GARDNER 2,693,927

CURTAIN ROD BRACKET Filed sept. 5, 19952 v INVENTOR.

United States Patent CURTAIN ROD BRACKET Byron T. Gardner, Ridgewood, N. J.

Application September 5, 1952, Serial No. 308,035

6 Claims. (Cl. 248-263) This invention relates to improvements in brackets or hangers for supporting curtain rods, drapery rods .and the like on window frames, door frames, walls and simllar elements of building structures. More particularly, the invention relates to brackets of the type having a projecting hook or prong adapted to be received 1n an opening or hole in the end of a metal or wood curtain rod to support the latter in spaced relatlon to a window frame or other element of a building structure.

The curtain rod and drapery rod brackets commonly available are provided with a base ange to be secured against the wall or window frame and have a proJecting hook, prong or collar to engage the end of a solid or hollow curtain rod and support it in proper relation to a window or the like. The hangers or brackets are usually secured to the building structure by means of nails or screws which are inserted through openings 1n the base plate of the bracket. Hangers or brackets of the type described generally above, have, as a general rule, one very undesirable feature. The holes in the base plate of the hanger are usually close-to the hook or prong in order to keep the size of the hanger or bracket small. Because of this arrangement of the holes it is difficult to insert a nail through the hole and hold it in position to be driven into the building structure with a hammer without striking the fingers. After the nail has been started into the hole, it is very diicult to drive the nail into the building structure without also striking and flattening the hook or prong on the bracket which, of course, thereafter must be straightened before the curtain rod can be applied to it. It is equally difficult to attach the bracket by means of screws because this usually necessitates forming of a starting hole in the building structure and driving the screw with a screw driver or the like, while standing on a step ladder or in some other inconvenient and usually uncomfortable position.

The present invention overcomes the above-noted disadvantages of the prior types of brackets by providing a bracket which has an anvil or striking member thereon which extends outwardly beyond the hook or prong which supports the curtain rod. The bracket also carries two or more spikes or points which may be driven into the building structure by striking the anvil or impact member so that the bracket can be conveniently held with the fingers out of the range of the hammer head. The provision of the anvil or striking surface extending outwardly beyond the hook or prong enables the bracket to be driven tightly against the wall without in any way damaging or distorting the hook or other curtain rodsupporting element thereon.

For a better understanding of the present invention, relflernce may be had to the accompanying drawing in w 1c Fig. 1 is a view in perspective of a blank from which braicket embodying the present invention may be prouce Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the bracket produced from the blank shown in Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is an exploded and perspective view of a modified form of bracket embodying the present invention; 4 is a view in section taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 5 is a perspective view of a blank from which the bracket disclosed in Fig. 3 is made; and

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of still another form of bracket embodying the present invention.

2,693,927 Patented Nov. 9, 1954 It is recognized in the art that curtain rod brackets may be provided with various types of hooks, prongs, collars and the like, for engagement in holes in the ends of a curtain rod or for engagement in telescopic relation in the ends of said curtain rods. The present invention will be described with reference to several different types of hooks and collars but it will beunderstood that the new brackets may be provided with any of the usual types of supporting elements for the curtain rods.

Referring now to Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawing, one form of bracket may consist of a sheet metal member 10 having a base plate 11 of rectangular or generally square form or, for that matter, any other desired form, depending upon the ornamental effect desired. At one edge of the base member 11 is a collar 12 having a resilient tongue 13 therein for engaging in the end of a hollow curtain rod. The collar 12 is of conventional type. At the opposite end of the base plate is a flange 14 which forms an anvil or striking member. Theange 14 consists of two layers of the metal, the outermost layer 14a being bent at an angle of about 90 to the base memberand the innermost layer 15 being bent toward the base plate 11 and engaging it to render the iiange 14 suiciently rigid to enable it to be struck at its outer edge 16 with a hammer without deforming or bending the ilange. The base plate also has a pair of spikes 17 and 18 extending in the opposite direction from the flange 14 and closely adjacent thereto. The bracket shown in Fig. 2 may be formed from the blank disclosed in Fig. l which consists of a generally rectangular body portion 19 which includes a section corresponding to the base flange 11 and the outer and inner layers 14a and 15 of the upstanding anvil or bracket flange 14. The left-hand end of the blank 19 has a T-shaped head portion 20 which can have its outer ends bent inwardly to form the collar 12. The tongue 13 is formed at about the mid-portion of the head portion 20. The spikes 17 and 18 extend outwardly from the corners of the base portion 11 of the blank 19 and, as described above, when bent at a right angle to the blank 19, extend in the opposite direction from the anvil or striking ilange 14.

The height of the flange 14 from the base plate 11 exceeds the height of the collar 12 so that the spikes 17 and 18 can be driven into the building structure by striking the outer end of the flange without striking and deforming the collar 12.

While the bracket 10 has been illustrated as having the collar 12 thereon, it will be understood that the collar 12 can be replaced with a hook integral with the base iiange or with a rod-like prong of generally hook shape which may be secured to the base flange 11 in any desired way. It will be understood also, that the bracket may be provided with a pair of collars or hooks to support a pair of curtain rods, if desired, and that brackets such as that shown in Fig. 2 can be made 1n rlght and left-hand types for engagement with opposite ends of the curtain rod.

Brackets embodying the general principles set forth above, are susceptible to considerable modification. Thus, for example, as shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 5, the bracket may be secured in position by means of a staple 25 Whlch is suitably mounted on the bracket 26 to form a .part of the striking or anvil member and also the spikes or prongs to be driven into the building structure. The bracket disclosed in Fig. 3 may be made from a blank of metal 27 such as that shown in Fig.. 5. The blank 27 includes a rectangular body portion 28 whlch, as illustrated, is divided into ve panels 29, 30, 31, 32 and 33. The panels 30 and 32 are provided with two pairs of slits 34 and 35. The narrow necks of metal between the pairs of slits can be bent out of the plane of the panels 30 and 32 to form loops 36 and 37. The panels 30 and 32 are bent at right angles to the interposed panel 31 and the panels 29 and 33 are bent at right angles to the panels 30 and 32, respectively, to make them substantially parallel with the panel 31, as shown in Fig. 3.

The outer ends of the panels 29 and 33 are provided with T-shaped extensions 38 and 39 which are bent to form the collars to engage in the ends of a pair of curtain rods. The height of the panels 30 and 32 is greater than the height of the collars 38 and 39 so that the channel-shaped structure provided by the panels 30, 31 and 32 extends outwardly from the base flanges 29 and 33 to form, in part, an anvil or striking surface. The panel 31 has a pair of holes 40 and 41 therein to receive the legs of the staple 25. The staple thus extends through the holes 40. and 41 and through the loops 36, 36 and 37, 37, where it is retained by fricttion. The base 25a of the staple is exposed in front of the panel 31 that it may be struck with a hammer or the like. to drive the legs of the staple into the building structure. The base. 25a of the staple when driven into the building structure engages the panel 31 to hold the bracket tightly against the building structure. The engagement of the staple in the holes 40, 41 and the loops 36, 36 and 37, 37 prevents the bracket from spreading and retains it securely in position.

lt will be understood that .the bracket shown in Figs. 3 to 5 can be modiiied, for example, by omitting one portion of the. base ange, for example the panel 33 and the collar 39 thereon if a single bracket is to be provided and the collars 3S and 39 may be replaced by hooks, prongs or the like, as the purpose demands.

A further modiiication of the invention is illustrated in Fig. 6. This form of bracket includes a base plate 4S of rectangular, square orl other suitable shape. The base plate 45 has a hook 46 formed at one edge thereo. Spaced from the hook 46 are 'a pair of openings 457 and 48 to receive the legs 49 and S0 of a ilat metal staple 51. As shown, the legs of the staple are formed with shoulders 52 and 53 about mid-Way of their length so that these shoulders bear against the front of the base plate 45'. The staple may be secured to the base plate by welding, brazing or, if desired, by making the openings 47 and 48 of slightly smaller size than the legs of the staples and securing the staple with a drive t. The base of the staple, as illustrated in Fig. 6, extends outwardly beyond the hook 46 so that the staple can be driven by means of a hammer or the like, without danger of striking or detorming the hook 46. While a staple formed of tlat metal has been disclosed in Fig. 6, it will be understood that ordinary wire staples can be used with equal facility by providing shoulders thereon or by welding or brazing the staple to the base. This form of the invention likewise may be modied to provide hooks at opposite ends of the base plate 4S for use in supporting a pair of curtain rods, if desired.

As indicated above, the invention is 'susceptible to considerable modification and, therefore, the forms of the invention disclosed herein should be considered as illustrative.

i claim.:

l. A bracket for supporting curtain rods and the like comprising a base plate, a supporting member fixed to and extending substantially perpendicular to said base plate to engage and support an end of' a curtain rod, a striking member on said base plate offset to one side of said supporting member and projecting outwardly from said base plate in the same direction as said supporting member and farther than said supporting member, and spikes extending fromsaid base plate away from said striking member and substantially in alignment therewith to be driven into a support by impact on the striking member.

2. A bracket to support a curtain rod comprising a base plate, a supporting member at one edge of said base plate and extending substantially perpendicular thereto to receive and support an end of a curtain rod, a striking member on said base plate and offset from said supporting member, said striking member extending substantially perpendicular to said base plate in the same direction as said supporting member, said striking member projecting farther from said base plate than said supporting member to enable said strikingv member to be struck without damaging said supporting member, and spikes extending from said base plate substantially in alignment with said striking member to be driven into a support by impact on said striking mem- 3. The bracket set forth in claim 2 in which said striking member and said spikes are a staple having pointed legs forming the spikes and a connecting back portion forming the striking surface, and said staple has shoulder portions on its legs about midway of their length for engaging said base plate to hold the latter against said support when the pointed ends of said legs are driven into said support.

4. A bracket to support a curtain rod and the like, comprising a base plate having a folded flange extending substantially perpendicular to the base plate, a curtain rod supporting member on said base plate offset to one side of said flange, said supporting member extending in the same direction as said flange and projecting from said base plate a shorter distance than said flange, and spikes extending from said base plate in the opposite direction from said ange and substantially in alignment therewith to be driven into a support.

5.. The bracket set forth in claim 4 comprising a staple mounted on said ilange and having pointed ends forming said spike.

6. The bracket set forth in claim 4 in which said flange has an end wall spaced from said base plate and spaced apart side walls having loops extending into alignment with said apertures, and a staple having a base portion engaging said end wall and legs extending through said apertures and loops and outwardly beyond the base plate to be driven into a support.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS l Date

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US294385 *Oct 19, 1883Mar 4, 1884 Bracket
US542535 *Jan 5, 1894Jul 9, 1895 Bracket
US876411 *Jul 12, 1907Jan 14, 1908James W TatumCurtain-shade bracket.
US1805784 *Feb 2, 1927May 19, 1931Ralph PetersonSupporting bracket
US2437779 *Jan 3, 1947Mar 16, 1948Leoni CarpentierToolholder
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2911176 *Feb 6, 1957Nov 3, 1959Roediger Herman RCurtain rod supporting corner bracket
US3475884 *May 9, 1966Nov 4, 1969Torit Mfg CoFilter bag collar
US4288057 *Nov 2, 1979Sep 8, 1981Sainsbury Jr Arthur WCurtain and window shade hardware
US5267718 *Dec 8, 1992Dec 7, 1993Indevco CorporationHanger structure
US6126126 *Jun 18, 1998Oct 3, 2000Mckiernan, Jr.; Robert D.Tack with three prongs
US6478273May 18, 2001Nov 12, 2002Matrix Innovative ProductsWall tack
US20070235622 *Feb 14, 2007Oct 11, 2007Kerry BaranWallboard appurtenance attachment
US20100288892 *Apr 12, 2010Nov 18, 2010Fermions, L.L.C.Wall support
US20140026392 *Mar 15, 2013Jan 30, 2014Liberty Hardware Mfg. Corp.Hardware mounting bracket, assembly and hardware
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/263, 248/216.1, 248/262
International ClassificationA47H1/00, A47H1/142
Cooperative ClassificationA47H1/142
European ClassificationA47H1/142