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Publication numberUS2693962 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 9, 1954
Filing dateJun 12, 1948
Priority dateJun 12, 1948
Publication numberUS 2693962 A, US 2693962A, US-A-2693962, US2693962 A, US2693962A
InventorsStevens Robert
Original AssigneeStevens Robert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dice game apparatus
US 2693962 A
Images(11)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 9, 1954 R TE S 2,693,962

DICE GAME APPARATUS Filed June 12, 1948 ll Sheeis-Sheet 1 IN V EN TOR.

Nov. 9, 1954 R. STEVENS 2,693,962

DICE GAME APPARATUS Filed June 12, 1348 ll Sheets-Sheet 2 WIN INDICATOR 5T 2ND 3RD 4TH ST" 2/975) J6\'W 6"'7"89"'|O" POINT INDICATOR COUNTER 4 5 6 8 9 IO SW'TCH Ea I I I I I I 2-3 SYSTEM RELAY GROUP aIZ II 7 56 I r\ I ADDING CONTACTS (M (55 283 CONTACTS RELAY 63 GROUP \POWER PLAY RELAY /SUPPL.ES ADDING COILS COIL A I com 3 CONTACTS CONTACTS SWITCH MANUAL 9 4/7 LEFT DIE RIGHT DIE DIE I A I RELAY GROUPS /9 5 DIE 52v PULSE SWITCH SHAKER COILS COILS 2533; I LEFT DIE RIGHT DIE \CAM.

J 48 f SWITCHES MOTOR IB E RAU 4a 4a FEELER SWITCH 35 o o 0 6 INVENTOR. 0 fioerz 62 62 9125 MAAQYWYAL Nov. 9, 1954 R. STEVENS DICE GAME APPARATUS l1 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 12, 1948 INVENTOR. 1 05622 J'fe 76226 f f I. I. f

Nov. 9, 1954 R. STEVENS DICE GAME APPARATUS ll Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June 12, 1948 5505622 WQ%%%ZL vmh Nov.

R. STEVENS DICE GAME APPARATUS Filed June 12, 1948 11 Sheets-Sheet 5 PZAY COUNTER ENE ADD RESET INVENTOR.

Nov. 9, 1954 STEVENS 2,693,962

DICE GAME APPARATUS Filed June 12, 1948 ll Sheets-Sheet 6 JNVENTOR.

Nov. 9, 1954 STEVENS 2,693,962

DICE GAME AP'PARATUS Filed June 12, 1948 ll Sheets-Sheet 7 IN V EN TOR.

@14 I 5:95 Faber? 52% #622219 BY I WJ M Nov. 9, 1954 R. STEVENS DICE GAME APPARATUS ll Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed June 12, 1948 NOV. 9, 1954 N$ 2,693,962

DICE GAME APPARATUS F'iled June 12, 1948 ll Sheets-Sheet 9 Nov. 9, 1954 NS 2,693,962

DICE GAME APPARATUS Filed June 12, 1948 ll Sheets-Sheet ll IN V EN TOR.

United States Patent DICE GAME APPARATUS Robert Stevens, Buffalo, N. Y.

Application June 12, 1948, Serial No. 32,681

16 Claims. (Cl. 273-145) This invention relates to amusement apparatus and more particularly to certain combinations of mechanical, electro-mechanical and/or electrical apparatus adapted to use in playing a game.

One of the objects of my invention is to provide electrically operated apparatus with and against which a person may play a game similating and following the rules of craps in respect to the determination of wins and losses.

My invention further has within its purview the provision of amusement apparatus wherein standard dice are shaken for each cast within clear view of a player and automatically read.

As another object, the invention comprehends a system of relays adapted to the addition of a plurality of variable digits.

A further object of this invention is to provide an electro-mechanical system for reading and totalizing the numbers on a plurality of dice.

It is another object of my invention to provide electromechanical apparatus for thoroughly shaking dice for each cast within the confines of a transparent closure, which apparatus further, and when desired, has selective periods of agitation of sufiicient length and violence to frustrate any attempts at dishonest manipulation.

My amusement apparatus comprehends the provision of a coin controlled dice game wherein a coin is deposited for each series of plays and each play of a series is initiated manually.

In the presently disclosed embodiment, my invention further has within its purview the provision of a dice game wherein the number of plays of a series varies and is controlled by chance and the usual rules of playing craps, in that each series is terminated by the occurrence of any one of several events which would result in a win or loss in a crap game.

In the progress of a game of the type referred to, my disclosed apparatus has for another object of the provision of automatic and variable recording apparatus for keeping before the player and pertinent information relative to each series of plays.

My invention further has within its purview the provision of automatic apparatus for shaking and handling dice for each play of a game within the view of the player.

As another object, the invention comprehends the provision of a simple and effective form of feeler switch, as well as circuit and contact arrangements therefor to accomplish the reading of dice.

An additional object of my invention is to provide a vibratory mechanism for shaking dice at the beginning of each play.

A further obiect of this invention is to provide a mechanism for positioning and holding dice for the reading of the cast numbers at each play.

It is another object of my invention to provide unified apparatus wherein various of the aforementioned features, functions and operations are correlated into a system for use in accordance with prescribed rules of play to effect the indication of wins or losses by a player in accordance with rules and chance.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and the accomnanying drawings in which similar characters of reference indicate similar parts through the several views.

Referring to the eleven sheets of drawings,

Fig. 1 is a perspective view looking downwardly from in front and to one side of the exterior of an enclosed assembly which embodies a preferred form of my invention;

Fig. 2 is a schematic block diagram which indicates generally the electrical parts of the preferred embodiment of my invention and their association in the operating system;

Figs. 3, 4, 5 and 6 are each partial and schematic circuit diagrams which, together, make up a wiring diagram of the electrical parts embodied in the preferred form of my amusement apparatus which is illustrated generally in Figs. 1 and 2;

Fig. 7 is a front elevational view of a preferred form of switch utilized in the preferred embodiment of my invention, in which view a part of the switch is cut away to depict details of inner structure and the use of the switch in association with a pair of dice is indicated;

Fig. 8 is a side elevational view of the switch shown in Fig. 7 with an associated portion of my preferred apparatus indicated fragmentarily;

Fig. 9 is a plan view of a preferred type of contact plate utilized in the switch disclosed in Figs. 7 and 8;

Fig. 10 is a top plan view of a preferred form of dice positioning and gripping element adapted to use in the preferred embodiment of my invention;

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary side elevational view of an end portion of the dice positioning and gripping element shown in Fig. 10 and wherein the view is taken substan tially as indicated by the line 11-11 in Fig. 10 and the associated arrows;

Fig. 12 is a sectional view wherein the section is taken substantially on a line 12-12 of Fig. 10 and in the direction indicated by the arrows;

Fig. 13 is a side sectional view of a portion of the mechanical operating mechanism embodied in the preferred form of my amusement apparatus wherein the section is taken at a position substantially as depicted by line 13-13 of Fig. 1 and in a direction indicated by the accompanying arrows; the parts being depicted in their normal positions of rest;

Fig. 14 is a sectional bottom view wherein the section is taken substantially as indicated by a line 14-14 in Fig. 13 and in a direction as indicated by the accompanying arrows;

Fig. 15 is a view similar to Fig. 14, but which illustrates a different operating position of the parts which occurs during the cycle of operation of the preferred embodiment of my amusement apparatus;

Fig. 16 is a side sectional view similar to Fig. 13, drawn to a somewhat smaller scale and depicting an operating position of the parts which corresponds to that of the parts shown in Fig. 15;

Fig. 17 is a sectional view taken substantially as indicated by a line 17-17 of Fig. 16 and in the direction indicated by the accompanying arrows;

Fig. 18 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially on a line 18-18 of Fig. 16 and in the direction indicated by the arrows;

Figs. 19 and 20 are respectively end sectional and end views taken substantially on lines 19-19 and 20-20 of Fig. 18 and in the directions indicated by arrows;

Fig. 21 is a fragmentary sectional view wherein the section is taken substantially at a position indicated by a line 21-21 in Fig. 15, the operating positions of the parts also corresponding to those depicted in Fig. 15 and Fig. 22 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially at a position indicated by a line 22-22 in Fig. 21 and viewed as indicated by the accompanying arrows.

By way of preliminary understanding of the rules of the game of craps, to which the disclosed apparatus is particularly adapted, although not confined, the application of those rules to the game as played with the disclosed apparatus, and certain of their aspects will here be given consideration. In the presently disclosed amuse ment apparatus, the dice are confined to the machine at all times. Thus, there is no concern for the change of dice from one person to another or the circumstances bringing about such changes.

In accordance with the usual rules of craps, the follow ing characteristics of play are followed by the preferred form of my apparatus which is herein disclosed. Essentially, they may be summarized as follows 1. If the sum of the uppermost digits indicated by the dice on the first throw of a series is seven or eleven, the player 1s a ccorded a win. 2. If the summation of the die digits is 2, 3 or 12 on the first throw of a series, the player loses. 3. If the dice indicate a total of 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 or 10 on the first throw of a series, the indicated one of those numbers becomes a point, which, if repeated in a series of plays before throwing a seven, counts as a w n If a seven precedes the throwing of a predetermined point number, the player loses.

In the accompanying drawings, an illustrative embodiment of my invention is disclosed for exemplary pur poses. Having particular reference to Fig. l, for consideration of certain of the more general aspects and arrangements of a preferred form of my amusement apparatus, the operating parts are enclosed in a housing 25, which housing is adapted to be supported by a suitable table or stand. As viewed by a player, the housing includes a sloping front panel 26 which, in the disclosed form of the apparatus, carries an instruction and rule card 27, a coin slot 28 (used when the apparatus is to be coin operated), a point indicator 29, an indicator 34) for showing the number of successive wins, and a play indicator 32 which provides a designation of the number of plays made in a given series.

In front of the sloping panel 26, and preferably on top of the horizontal housing panel 33, is a transparent dome 34, made of a transparent molded plastic material or the like, which encloses the playing elements of the game which, in the present instance, are dice 35 and 36. These playing elements or dice remain at all times within the view of a player or observer.

At a convenient position for manual operation, as at one side of the housing 25, a handle 37 is mounted for rotational movement. In the disclosed apparatus, and as will be more fully described, the deposit of a coin in the coin slot 28 effects initial energization of the operating parts of the apparatus while manual movement of the handle 37 in a prescribed manner initiates the cycle of operation of each play and provides some control of the length of time during which the dice are randomly shaken within the dome 34.

From the standpoint of a player and after the player has deposited a coin of a given denomination in the coin slot 28, the player depresses the handle 37 at will to initiate each play of a series; each series being terminated by a win or a loss. Each successive win is recorded and designated by the win indicator 30. Each loss returns all of the indicators to their zero or off positions.

In the disclosed apparatus, and by preference, in order to prevent the dice from being only slightly moved without turning over or merely nudged over with some practiced control by a player, the apparatus embodies a control for the minimum time of dice shaking which cannot be avoided by the player. Also, and by preference, the apparatus includes a control for the maximum time of shaking of the dice, in order to prevent undue abuse of the apparatus. Between the minimum and maximum limits, the dice shaking time is within the control of the player and is dependent upon the length of time during which the handle 37 is depressed.

During the process of play, each play involves a cycle of operations of the apparatus, which cycle is automatically carried out by the apparatus after the initiation of the play by depression of the handle 37. That is, the dice are randomly and, by preference, quite violently shaken Wlthln the confines of the transparent dome 34. Upon conung to rest after the shaking action, the dice are positloned within the dome without being turned over, the uppermost indicia or indicated digits of the dice are electro-mechanically ascertained by the apparatus and the results automatically indicated in accordance with the rules of the game. Following such indication, the apparatus automatically prepares for the succeeding play. The termination of a series of plays by win or loss effects the necessity for the deposit of a coin in order to continue playing. Within a series, however, when a player is attempting to make a predetermined point, the successive plays are started by the mere depression of the operating handle 37, without the deposit of coins.

The control system and operation of a preferred embodiment of my amusement apparatus may be considered in greater detail, and for the purpose of obtaining a summarized understanding thereof without concern for the complete details of the electrical and mechanical parts and their arrangements, by reference to the schematic block diagram of Fig. 2. It is to be understood in connection with this block diagram that it is not strictly a wiring diagram, but merely a schematic illustration depicting parts and groups of parts by the blocks and the general organization or the relationships of those parts by connecting lines.

As an aid to effecting a distinction between the results produced by the occurrence of predetermined indicia on the dice on the first and subsequent plays of a series, as well as to divide certain controls, two power sources A and B are utilized. A coin switch 38, actuated by placement of a coin in the coin slot 28 (Fig. 1), effects closure of what may be termed preparatory circuits through, or in consequence of which the functional parts of the apparatus are subsequently energized. After operation of the coin switch 38, operation of a switch 39 by manual movement of the handle 37 (Fig. 1) closes a circuit to a shaker mechanism and control circuit 40 which, in turn, automatically closes a circuit to a motor 42 having a driven cam switch 43 actuated thereby. The motor 42, in addition to driving the cam switch 43 which divides the cycles of operation and provides sequence control. also drives the mechanical parts of the apparatus by Which the dice are positioned after being shaken, actuates parts making the dice accessible to a feeler switch 44 and moves the feeler switch to etfect the electrical reading of the dice by the switch.

Circuits individualized to the number or indicia on the bottom face of each of the dice 35 and 36 are established by contacts 45 and 46 of die relay groups .7 and 48 having actuating coils 49 and 50 respectively energized by a pulse of current from source A and produced through a pulse relay circuit 52 in timed relationship to the operation of the feeler switch 44, and after the circuits through the latter switch are completed. The contacts of one die relay group control the energization of actuating coils 53 of an adding relay group 54; while the contacts of the other die relay group control circuits from one of the designated power sources to contacts 55 of the adding relay group 54. It is the function of the adding relay group in conjunction with the contacts of the die relay groups to interpolate the numbers on the bottom faces of the dice to those on the top faces by subtraction of the bottom face numbers from seven, and effectively to add to the top face numbers.

A system relay group 56 translates the added numbers into play results and, in association with a play relay 57, correlates the play results with the number of plays in a given series. That is, on the first play of a series, circuits are formed through contacts of one die relay group and the adding group contacts to the system group from source A. If there are subsequent plays in the series, the circuits through the contacts of the same die and adding groups to the system group are from source B. Relays in the system group control the point indicator 29, the win indicator 30, and the play indicator 32, as well as win and lose relays 58 and 59 respectively. The win and lose relays terminate the series of plays, whether those series consist of one or more plays.

By way of indication of the relationship between the schematic block diagram of Fig. 2 and the actual circuit diagrams of Figs. 3, 4, 5 and 6, Fig. 3 shows schematicaly the circuits and contacts of the feeler switch 44, the circuits of the actuating coils 49 and 50 and circuits of the contacts 45 and 46 of the die relay groups 47 and 48 respectively. Fig. 4 depicts the circuits of the actuating coils 53 and contacts 55 of the adding relay group 54. Fig. 5 includes schematically portions of the circuits embodying the power sources A and B, coin switch 38, play relay 57, the system relay group 56, win indicator 30, play indicator 32 and the win and lose relays 58 and 59. Fig. 6 embodies a diagrammatic representation of the portion of the circuit which includes the shaker timing and actuating parts 40, the manually operated switch 39 and motor 42.

Reference is now made to the circuit diagrams of Figs. 3 to 6 inclusive, wherein the various relays and switches are shown in their normal positionssuch posi tions being those assumed when the apparatus is not in operation and the actuating parts are de-energized. Th PO Sources A and B for the apparatus are depicted in Fig. 5. In the disclosed apparatus, the power sources A and B respectively comprise half wave rectifiers and 62 connected to windings 63 and 64 of a transformer 65 which preferably has a 1:1 ratio and is utilized principally for the purpose of electrically segregating the two D. C. power sources, although both are primarily energized from a single A. C. source through power supply line leads 66a and 66b. One side of the rectifier 60 is connected to one end of the winding 63 while one side of the rectifier 62 is connected to one end of the transformer winding 64. A condenser 67 is connected across the other side of the rectifier 60 and the other end of the transformer winding 63. Another condenser 68 is connected across the other side of the rectifier 62 and the other end of the transformer winding 64. Thus, the two terminals of each of the condensers 67 and 68 serve as the positive and negative terminals of power sources A and 13.

With the power sources of the apparatus thus defined, the operation of the electrical apparatus will be considered in an order following that which occurs in the playing of a game. When a coin 69 of predetermined denomination is dropped into the coin slot 28 (Fig. 1), it effects actuation of the coin switch 38 to close a circuit from power source A to an actuating coil 70 of a coin relay 72 through normally closed series connected contacts 73 and 74 of the win and lose relays 58 and 59 respectively. Momentary operation of the coin relay 72 through normally open contacts 75 of the coin switch 38 closes a holding circuit for the coin relay through normally open contacts 76 of that relay and the normally closed contacts 73 and 74 of the win and lose relays 58 and 59. Contacts 77 of the coin relay 72 close a circuit to a lead 78 (Figs. 5 and 6) through which power is supplied to the manually operable switch 39, by the actuation of which the dice shaker control circuit of Fig. 6 is put in operation. This circuit also passes through the normally closed contacts of the win and lose relays 58 and 59, as well as the lead 78 in Figs. 5 and 6, and normally closed contacts 79 of a cam switch 80. A lead 82 normally provides a connection from the positive terminal of power source A to the shaker control circuit of Fig. 6. Normally open contacts 83 of the coin relay 72 close a circuit from the negative terminal of power source A and a lead 84, which appears in the upper and lower portions of Fig. 5, to prepare a lo6cking circuit for certain relays of the system relay group 5 In the power connections between the portions of the circuit shown in Figs. 5 and 6, it may be noted that in addition to the connection from the positive terminal of power source A which is provided through the lead 82, there are also connections to the negative terminal of source A through a lead 85 in Fig. 5 to lead 85 in Fig. 6. It is through leads 85 and 82 in Fig. 6, and through a bleeder resistor 86 in Fig. 6, which resistor has a relatively high resistance value, that a relatively large condenser 87 is normally kept charged from power source A The operation of the circuit as thus far described includes the preliminary functions which are accomplished as a result of the deposit of a coin and indicates the steps preparatory to the manual operation of the switch 39 by movement of handle 37 (Fig. 1). As has been previously indicated, there is a considered desirability of having time limits for the dice shaking, which time limits are preestablished and automatically determined, although leaving control between those time limits to the discretion of the player. In the disclosed circuit the condenser 87 and a condenser 88 (Fig. 6) are preselected in size to establish the dice shaking time limits.

When the manually operable switch 39 is closed by the player after the deposit of a coin, it completes a circuit to an actuating coil 90 of a relay 92 in the shaker timing control circuit, and as shown in Fig. 6. This initial actuating circuit for the relay 92 is through the normally closed contacts 79 of the cam switch 80 and through normally closed contacts 93 of a relay 94. The initial actuation of the relay 90 from power source A and through the manuaily operable switch 39 connects the actuating coil 90 of that relay across the condenser 87 through normally open contacts 95 of the relay. The condenser 87 being normally charged from power source A through the bleeder resistor 86 and the leads 82 and 85, the discharge or" that condenser through the actuating coil 90 of relay 92 holds relay 90 in its actuated position for a period of time dependent upon the capacity of the condenser 87; it being understood that the current flow through the resistor 86 is well below that required to eifect operation of the relay 92. The capacity of the condenser 87 thus determines the minimum time interval of operation of the dice shaking mechanism, and has a capacity preselected to hold the relay 92 for a predetermined time interval, such as one second.

The operation of relay 92 closes a circuit to an actuating coil 96 of the relay 94 and through normally open contacts 97 of the relay 92. When the relay 94 is thus actuated, it is locked in the actuated position by a circuit closed through its normally open contacts 98. Also, the opening of the normally closed contacts 93 of the relay 94 opens the initial actuating circuit for the relay 92, although leaving the relay 92 held in its actuated position by the discharge of the timing condenser 87. The operation of the relay 92, in addition to effecting operation of the relay 94, also closes an actuating circuit through its normally open contacts 99 to an actuating coil 100 of a relay 102. A condenser 103 which is connected across the actuating coil 100 of the relay 102 is charged while the power circuit to the actuating coil 100 is closed. The operation of relay 102 closes a circuit through normally open contacts 104 of that relay to an actuating electromagnet 105 of a dice shaking mechanism which will be more fully described.

The actuating electromagnet 105 is provided with buzzer type contacts 106 connected in series with the electromagnet and actuated thereby to produce periodic energization of the electromagnet which effects vibratory action and random shaking of the dice. Thus, operation of relays 92, 94 and 102 starts the shaking of the dice, which shaking action proceeds at least as long as the relay 92 remains operated as a result of its connection across the timing condenser 87.

The operation of the relay 94 closes a circuit through normally open contacts 107 of that relay, normally closed contacts 108 of the relay 102 and normally closed contacts 109 of the cam switch 80 to the motor 42. The latter circuit, however, is opened at practically the same instant by the opening of contacts 108 of the relay 102, so that there is no effective operation of the motor 42 until the relay 102 becomes deenergized while the relay 94 is actuated. When the relays 92, 94 and 102 are all operated, as is the case when the relay 92 is held in its actuated position by the discharge of the timing condenser 87, normally closed contacts 93 of the relay 94 are opened, normally open contacts 110 of the relay 94 are closed, normally closed contacts 111 of the relay 92 are opened and normally open contacts 112 of the relay 102 are closed. Thus, the contacts 111 of. the relay 92, while they are open during the minimum operating time of the shaker electromagnet, prevent a circuit from being completed through the manually operated switch 39, contacts 110 of relay 94, contacts 112 of relay 102 and the timing condenser 88 to the actuating coil 100 of the relay 102 from power source A. The timing condenser 88 is normally kept discharged through a resistor 113 having a high resistance value and connected thereacross.

If the manually operated switch 39 has been released by the player prior to the expiration of the minimum holding time of the relay 92 which is determined by the condenser 87, the opening of the contacts of relay 92 will break the circuit to the actuated coil 100 of the relay 102, as WBrl as the operating circuit to the actuating coil 96 of the relay 94. The relay 102 remains operated for a short period of time because of the charge accumulated by the condenser 103 which is connected across the actuating coil of that relay. Also, the relay 94 remains actuated after the opening of the contacts of relay 92 and until its holding circuit is broken by the contacts 79 of the cam switch. However, although the closing of the contacts 111 occurs upon the deenergization of the relay 92 and before the contacts 112 of the relay 102 are opened, because of the slow release of the relay 102 caused by the condenser 103, the power circuit to the actuating coil 100 of relay 102 through the timing condenser 83 is broken by the previous opening of the manually operated switch 39. Following the aforementioned conditions, and upon the release of relay 102 while relay 94 is still operated, a starting circuit to the motor 42 is closed through the contacts 79 of cam switch 80, contacts 107 of relay 94, contacts 108 of relay 102 and contacts 109 of cam switch 80.

If, on the other hand, the manually operated switch 39 is held closed for a period of time exceeding that required for the discharge of the timing condenser 87 through the actuating coil of the relay 92, the contacts 111 of the relay 92 will close at the end of the predetermined minimum time period and while the relays 94 and 102 are actuated; the relay 102 being held actuated by the charge of the condenser 103. In this instance, and either until the manually operated switch 39 is opened by the player or until the timing condenser 88 has acquired a charge of a magnitude such that the current flow thereto through the actuating coil 100 of the relay 102 is insuflicient to keep the latter relay operated, whichever occurs first, the relay 102 will remain operated and keep the circuit to the shaker electromagnet 105 closed through the contacts 104. The capacity of the timing condenser 88 is preselected to determine the maximum holding time for the relay 102 and consequently the maximum dice shaking time. This time may be, for example, three seconds. If the manually operated switch 39 is opened by the player prior to the time in which the timing condenser 88 acquires a full charge, the holding circuit to the actuating coil of the relay 102 is broken by that manually operated switch, so that the dice shaking time between the minimum and maximum limits is under the control of the player.

As in the previously described instance, the deenergization of relay 102, either because the manually operated switch 39 has been opened or because the timing condenser 88 has become charged, opens a circuit through the contacts 104 to the shaker electromagnet and produces an additional break in the circuit connecting the actuating coil 100 to the timing condenser 88 through the contacts 112, so that the dice shaking action is stopped and cannot be restarted while the relay 94 is still actuated. The relay 94 remaining actuated until the motor 42 has been started, a starting circuit for that motor is closed by the closing of contacts 108 of the relay 102 as previously described.

The starting of the motor 42 which actuates the mechanical operating parts of the apparatus also effects actuation of the cam switch 80 to open the normally closed contacts 79 and 109 thereof and to close normally open contacts 114 of that switch. The opening of the normally closed contacts 79 of the cam switch 80 breaks the holding circuit of the relay 94 to efiect its deenergization and also breaks the power circuit to the manually operated switch 39, so that the dice shaking mechanism cannot be operated during the progress of the cycle of operation of the apparatus after the dice have been once shaken for that cycle. Continued operation of the motor 42 for a complete cycle which is determined by the return of the cam switch 80 to its normal position is insured by a power circuit closed to the motor 42 through the contacts 114 of the cam switch. If a cycle of operation is interrupted by power failure, that cycle will be completed upon the resumption of power supply and before a new cycle of operation may be started. When the cam switch 80 returns to its normal position at the end of a cycle, the operating circuit to the motor 42 is broken by the contacts 114 and the shaker control apparatus may be restarted for another cycle by operation of the manually operated switch 39, the circuit to which is reestablished by the reclosing of the contacts 79 of the cam swrtc In addition to the actuation of switch 80, the operation of the motor 42 actuates certain other switches and mechanical parts of the apparatus, as will be more fully described, to position the dice within the dome 34, effect exposure of the indicia on the lower surfaces of the dice, actuate the feeler switch 44 to effect a determination of the exposed indicia and, while the feeler switch 44 is in position for determining the exposed indicia on the dice, a switch 135 (Fig. is closed to connect one side of a relatively large condenser 136 to the negative terminal of power source A.

To facilitate an understanding of the operation of the feeler switch 44, particularly the contact arrangement of that switch by which the indicia of standard dice may be determined by a number of contacts considerably less than the possible positions of such indicia, attention is directed to the contact arrangement which is schematically illustrated for the feeler switch 44 at the lower portion of Fig. 3. When the dice are positioned by the apparatus after being shaken, the indicia or spots on each die are located at one or more of the positions designated by the circles at S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7, S8, S9, S11, S12, S13, S14, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S19. In other words, when positioned, the possible positions of the spots corresponding to each of the die numbers are as follows: lS5; 2S1 and S9 or S3 and S7; 3S1, S5 and S9 or S3, S5 and S7; 4-S1, S3, S7 and S9; S1, S3, S5, S7 and S9; 6S1, S4, S7, S3, S6, and S9 or S1, S2, S3, S7, S8 and S9. The variations in some instances depend upon the rotation of the die about its vertical axis. Also, the spot positions corresponding to each digit of the other die are similar to those listed for the one die.

As is usual with most standard dice, the spot positions are depressed into the dice and with reference to the face surfaces thereof. This difference of the levels of the spot positions from the die surfaces is utilized in the disclosed apparatus for effecting actuation of feeler switch contacts. Furthermore, by judicious selection of the contact positions and circuit connections, circuits individualized to each of the six die digits and for any die position may be closed through only five switch contacts for each die. As viewed in Fig. 3, the contacts of the feeler switch 44 adapted to engage the die in the left hand position are designated as L1, L2, L3, L4 and L5; while similarly arranged contacts for the other die are designated by reference characters R1, R2, R3, R4 and R5. With the disclosed structure, the contact arrangement is such that feeler prongs on each of the contacts L1, L2, L3, L4, and L5, R1, R2, R3, R4 and R5 are aligned with spot positions S1, S3, S5, S4, S8, S11, S13, S15, S14 and S18 respectively. The arrangement is further, and by preference, such that engagement with the die surface other than at a spot position efiects separation of normally closed contacts; while alignment with a spot position leaves the contact closed, as the result of the difference between spot and die face levels.

With the disclosed contact arrangements, the die digits corresponding to the feeler switch contacts closed when those digits appear on the surface of the die exposed to the feeler switch are as follows: 1L3 and R3; 2L1 or L2 and R1 or R2; L1 and L3 or L2 and L3 and R1 and R3 or R2 and R3; 4L1 and L2 and R1 and R2; 5-L1, L2 and L3 and R1, R2 and R3; 6-L4 or L5 and R4 or R5.

Corresponding ones of the contacts of the feeler switch are all connected in parallel and to a power bus 137, which bus, as shown in Fig. 5, is connected to the positive terminal of power source A. Each of the other and co-acting contacts of the feeler switch is connected to an actuating coil of a relay of the die relay groups 47 and 48. That is, contacts L4 and L5 are connected together and to an actuating coil 138 of a relay LRl. Contact L1 is connected to an actuating coil 139 of a relay LR2. Contact L2 is connected to an actuating coil 140 of a relay LR3, and contact L3 is connected to an actuating coil 142 of a relay LR4. Similarly, contacts R4 and R5 are connected together and to an actuating coil 143 of a relay RRl. Contact R1 is connected to an actuating coil 144 of a relay RR2. Contact R2 is connected to an actuating coil 145 of a relay RR3 and contact R3 is connected to an actuating coil 146 of a relay RR4. It is the purpose of the four relays LRl, LR2, LR3 and LR4, which comprise die relay group 47 and the circuit connections of those relays, to act in response to current flow through various of the feeler switch contacts L1, L2, L3, L4 and L5 to establish circuits individualized to the digits of one die; while the relays RRl, RR2, RR3 and RR4 which constitute die relay group 48 and the respective circuits of those relays establish circuits individualized to the digits of the other die.

For the present, it may sutfice to state that the various die digits effect actuation of the relays of the die relay groups as follows: LR4 and RR4; LR2 or LR3 and RR2 or RR3; LR2 or LR3 and LR4 and RR2 or RR3 and RR4; LR2 and LR3 and RR2 and RR3; LR2, LR3 and LR4, RR2, RR3 and RR4; 6LR1 and RRl.

Returning to the more general aspects of the circuit operation, it may be recalled that closing of the contacts of switch 135 (Fig. 5) for a predetermined interval of time correlated with the movement of the feeler switch 44 is effected during the operating cycle of the motor 42 (Fig. 6). The contacts of switch 135 complete a circuit through an actuating coil 147 of a quick acting relay 148 from power source A to a condenser 136 of relatively large capacity. Condenser 136 is bridged by resistor 149, the resistance value of which is sufiiciently high that the current flow through the resistor and actuating coil 147 of the relay 148 from power source A will neither effect actuation of relay 148 nor hold that relay in its actuated position. On the other hand, resistor 149 provides a bleeder circuit across condenser 136 which normally keeps that condenser discharged. The current flow to the condenser 136 from power source A and the time required for charging that condenser are determined in part by the capacity of the condenser; that capacity being selected to effect actuation of the quick acting relay 148 for a predetermined time interval after and during which the selective circuits of the feeler switch contacts are established.

Normally open contacts 150 of the relay 148 complete a circuit through a lead 152 (Figs. 3 and to the actuating coils of two or more of the relays LR1, LR2, LR3, LR4, RRl, RR2, RR3 and RR4 to which circuits are established by contacts of the feeler switch, as described. Also, normally open contacts 153 of the relay 148 (Fig. 5) close a circuit from power source A to an actuating coil 154 of the play indicator 32 to count the play of a series by moving that indicator up one digit.

At the same time that a circuit is completed to the actuating coils of the relays of the die relay groups through the contacts 150 of the relay 148 (Fig. 5) through lead 152, those same contacts 150 close a circuit to an actuating coil 155 of a slow acting relay 156. Although various types of slow acting relays are adapted to the uses intended the relay 156 is designated by illustration in the present embodiment of my invention as a copper slug on the core which makes it somewhat slow to respond and causes it to hold its contacts closed for an appreciable time interval after the circuit to the actuating coil 155 has been opened. Thus, the timing of the actuation of the relay 156 is such that it operates after the relays of the die relay groups have been actuated. The purpose of the actuation of relays 148 and 156 for predetermined time intervals correlated with the operation of the feeler switch is to send pulses of current of limited time duration through contacts 157 and 158 of the relay 156 and leads 159 and 160 respectively to and through the contacts and circuits of the die relay groups 48 and 47 respectively (Fig. 3) to the adding relay group shown in Fig. 4. It is to be noted that with the structure and arrangement of apparatus presently disclosed the feeler switch acts upon the bottom surfaces of the dice, while the digits of the opposed upper surfaces are subject to the usual visual reading. However, since the numbers on opposed faces of standard dice total seven, interpolation from the digits ascertained by the feeler switch may be readily effected.

Although the contact combinations of the corresponding relays of the die relay groups 47 and 48 and the interconnections of those are similarly arranged, it is to be noted that the contacts of die relay group 47 (Fig. 3) control circuits through leads 162, 163, 164, 165, 166 and 167 to the contacts of the relays of the adding groups 54, shown in Fig. 4; while the contacts of die relay group 48 control circuits through leads 168, 169, 170, 172, 173 and 174 (Fig. 3) to actuating coils 175, 176, 177, 178, 179 and 180 of relays AR1, AR2, AR3, AR4, ARS and AR6 of the adding relay group 54. However, in view of the similarity of the contact arrangements and circuits for the relays of the die relay groups 47 and 48, it is considered suflicient to outline the contact and circuit combinations for each die digit with respect to only one of the contact groups.

As has been explained, lead 160, which is shown in Figs. 3 and 5, is energized by a pulse of current during, the period of closure of the contacts 158 of relay 156 (Fig. 5). When the contacts of the play relay 57 are in their normal positions, as shown in Fig. 5, which is the case on the first play of any series, the aforementioned pulse of current is from the negative terminal of power source A. It is that pulse of current which passes through contact combinations of the relays of die relay group 47 to selected contacts of the adding group 54 (Fig. 4). On the other hand, the pulse of current provided through the contacts 150 and 157 of relays 148 and 156 respectively to lead 159 (Fig. 5) is always from the negative terminal of power source A and passes through actuated contact combinations of die relay group 48 to the actuating coils of the adding relay group (Fig. 4) to effect actuation of those relays of the adding group; the return circuit to power source A from the actuating coils of the dding group being through a lead 182 (Figs. 4 and Starting with die digit 1 which effects actuation of relay LR4, a circuit is provided from lead through normally closed contacts 183, 184 and 185 of relays LR1, LR2 and LR3 respectively and normally open contacts 186 of relay LR4 to lead 162. As shown in Fig. 4, lead 162 transmits the pulse of current to parallel connected ones of normally open contacts AC16, AC26, AC36, AC46, AC56 and AC66 of adding group relays AR1, AR2, AR3, AR4, ARS and AR6 respectively.

Die digit "2 effects actuation of one or the other of relays LR2 and LR3. WWhen relay LR2 is actuated, the current pulse circuit from lead 160 is through the normally closed contacts 183 of relay LR1, normally closed contacts 187 of relay LR3, normally open contacts 188 of relay LR2 and normally closed contacts 189 of relay LR4 to the lead 163. When the relay LR3 is actuated instead of LR2, the circuit from the lead 160 is through the normally closed contacts 183 of relay LR1, normally closed contacts 190 of relay LR2, normally open contacts 192 of relay LR3 and normally closed contacts 189 of relay LR4 to the lead 163. In either instance, and as shown in Fig. 4, the pulse of current is transmitted by lead 163 to parallel connected contacts ACIS, AC25, AC35, A045, A055 and AC65 of adding group relays AR1, AR2, AR3, AR4, ARS and AR6 respectively.

When the die digit is 3, either relay LR2 or LR3 and relay LR4 are actuated. When relays LR2 and LR4 are actuated, a circuit is provided from lead 160 through the normally closed contacts 183 of relay LR1, normally closed contacts 187 of relay LR3, normally open contacts 188 of relay LR2 and normally open contacts 193 of relay LR4 to the lead 164. When relays LR3 and LR4 are actuated, the circuit is the same, except that it is through the normally open contacts 192 of relay LR3 instead of through the normally open contacts 188 of relay LR2; the contacts 190 of relay LR2 and contacts 187 of relay LR3 also being alternated. As shown on Fig. 4, the pulse is transmitted by lead 164 to parallel connected ones of the contacts AC14, AC24, AC34, AC44, AC54 and AC64 of adding relays AR1, AR2, AR3, AR4, AR5 and AR6 respectively.

When the die digit is 4, relays LR2 and LR3 are actuated. In this instance, the pulse circuit from lead 160 is through normally closed contacts 183 of relay LR1, normally open contacts 194 of relay LR2, normally open contacts 195 of relay LR3 and normally closed contacts 196 of relay LR4 to the lead 165. Through the lead 165, as shown in Fig. 4, connection is made to parallel con nected ones of contacts AC13, AC23, AC33, AC43, AC53 and AC63 of adding relays AR1, AR2, AR3, AR4, ARS and AR6 respectively.

When the die digit is 5, relays LR2, LR3 and LR4 are actuated. In this event, the pulse circuit from the lead 160 is through the normally closed contacts 183 of relay LR1, normally open contacts 194 of relay LR2, normally open contacts 195 of relay LR3 and normally open contacts 197 of relay LR4 to the lead 166. As depicted in Fig. 4, the lead 166 carries the pulse to parallel connected ones of the contacts AC12, AC22, AC3Z, AC42, AC52 and AC62 of adding relays AR1, AR2, AR3, AR4, ARS and AR6.

When the die digit is 6, a pulse circuit is completed directly from the lead 166 to the lead 167 through normally open contacts 198 of the relay LR1, which relay is the only one of its die relay group that is actuated. Normally closed contacts 199 of the relay LR1 are opened when the die digit is 6, so that there is no possibility of the actuation of additional ones of the relays of the die relay group. As depicted in Fig. 4, a pulse of current carried by the lead 167 is transmitted to parallel connected ones of the contacts ACII, AC21, AC31, AC41, AC51 and AC61 of relays AR1, AR2, AR3, AR4, ARS and AR6 respectively.

In die relay group 48, as shown in Fig. 3, the numbers by which the contacts of relays RRl, RRZ, RR3 and RR4 are designated correspond to the numbers applied to the contacts of relays LR1, LR2, LR3 and LR4 respectively, except that each of those contact numbers has a prime mark appended thereto. By following the same numbers in connection with the description provided for the circuit connections of die relay group 47 corresponding to each die digit, the circuits through die relay group 48 may be traced for each die digit and between the lead 1591 and leads 168, 169, 170, 172, 173 and 174 respective y.

The die digits referred to in tracing the circuits to the contacts and actuating coils of relays AR1, AR2, AR3, AR4, ARS and AR6 of the adding group in Fig. 4, as described, are the digits of the bottom die faces, and not the digits designated by visible top faces. The interpolation is made in the adding group which is shown in Fig. 4. In other words, the numbers represented by the actuating coils 175, 176, 177, 178, 179 and 180 of relay coils ARI, AR2, AR3, AR4, AR and AR6 are l, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 respectively. Thus a 6 on the bottom face of one die effects actuation of the relay ARI which represents the digit 1; and 5 on the bottom face of that die effects actuation of the relay AR2 which represents the digit 2, and so on. In like manner, a 6 on the bottom face of the other die sends a pulse of current to a contact of each of the adding relays ARI, AR2, AR3, AR4, AR5 and 9R6, 1which contact, in each instance, represents the From the description, at this point, it may be understood that a pulse of current transmitted to one of the relays ARl, AR2, AR3, AR4, AR5 or AR6 effects actuation of all of the six contacts of that relay. At the same time, a pulse of current responsive to the number on the other die is transmitted to a selected one of the contacts of the actuated relay. The actuated relay being thus selectively representative of the visible digit of one die and the energized contact of that relay being selectively representative of the visible digit on the other die, a pulse of current is transmitted through the energized contacts of the actuated relay to a lead which is thus individualized to the summation of the two visible die digits.

Having reference to Fig. 4, a digit 1 visible on one die effects actuation of relay ARI to close the six contacts of that relay. When the digit on the other die is one, the current pulse is transmitted through the contacts AC11. When the visible digit of the second die is 2 instead of l, the pulse of current is transmitted through contacts AC12. In like manner, the adding group relay and its pulse transmitting contacts may be selected for each possible combination of die digits. There being various combinations of die digits which add to the same number, the contacts representative of like summations of the die digits are connected together and to output leads. instance, contacts AC13, AC22 and AC31 are each representative of the summation of die digits which total 4 and are connected to a common output lead 204. In like manner, contacts representative of each of the summarized die digits 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 are connected together and to leads 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210 and 211 respectively. Since, in the present instance, and for the purposes of a crap game, the die digits totalling 2, 3 and 12 are of the same effect, contacts AC11, AC12, AC21 and AC66 which are representative of those numbers are connected together and to a common output lead 212. It may also be pointed out that for the purposes of a game of craps, the numbers 7 and 11 may be considered special numbers, while the numbers 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 10 are those usually referred to as point numbers or points.

By reference to the upper portion of Fig. 5, it may be observed that the leads 204, 205, 206, 208, 209 and 210 which correspond to the point numbers are respectively connected through normally closed contacts 213, 214, 215, 216, 217 and 218 of point relays P4, P5, P6, P8, P9 and P10 to terminals of actuating coils 219, 220, 222, 223, 224, and 225 of those relays. The other terminals of those actuating coils are connected in parallel and to a lead 226, which latter lead, as shown in the lower portion of Fig. 5, provides a return circuit to the positive terminal of power source A. Thus, when any of the point numbers are produced by the first play of a series, the corresponding one of relays P4, P5, P6, P8, P9 or P10 is energized by the pulse of current transmitted through the adding relay contacts from power source A. Condensers 227, 228, 229, 230, 232 and 233 are connected across the respective actuating coils 219, 220, 222, 223, 224 and 225 of the point relays to insure the actuation of those relays by the current pulse. Normally open contacts 234,

For

235, 236, 237, 238, and 239 of the point relays P4, P5, P6, P8, P9 and P10 respectively are connected to the lead 84 which connects to the negative terminal of power source A through the contacts 83 of the coin relay to form a holding c1rcu1t which maintains an actuated one of the point relays in its operated position, after being initially actuated by the current pulse, as described.

In the disclosed apparatus, gas discharge glow lamps 240, 242, 243, 244, 245 and 246 are utilized as point indicators for each of the points 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 10 respectively. One electrode of each of the glow lamps is connected to a lead 251, which lead provides a circuit to the positive terminal of power source A. The same lead 84 which provides the holding circuit for maintaining actuation of the point relays also provides a circuit through the normally open contacts 234, 235, 236, 237, 238 or 239 to the other electrode of each of the respective glow lamps, so that when a point relay is actuated, its associated glow lamp is lit. Also, normally open contacts 247, 248, 249, 250, 252 and 253 of the relays P4, P5, P6, P8, P9 and P10 respectively are each adapted to close a circuit from a respective one of the leads 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, and 210 to a lead 254, which latter lead, as shown in the lower portion of Fig. 5, is connected to one end of an actuating coil 255 of the win relay 58. The other end of the actuating coil 255 of the win relay being connected to the negative terminal of power source B, the win relay will not be operated by the closing of one of the normally open contacts 247, 248, 249, 250, 252 or 253 of the point relays unless the pulse through the adding group relays and leads 204, 205, 206, 208, 209 or 210 is from the positive terminal of power source B. On the first play of a series and as was previously explained, the pulse through the relays of the adding group is from power source A. Hence, the occurrence of a point number on the first play of a series records the point by illumination of the appropriate glow lamp and prepares a circuit, as described, to the win relay which is effective to produce actuation of that relay if the point number occurs a second time before the occurrence of a 7 which eifects operation of the lose relay 59, thereby to return the circuit parts to their normal positions.

If the sum of the die digits is 2, 3 or 12 on the first play of a series, the pulse of current from power source A which is provided by the action of relays 148 and 156 (Fig. 5) is transmitted to appropriate contacts of the adding relay group 54 (Fig. 4), and thence through the lead 212 and normally closed contacts 256 of the play relay 57 (Fig. 5) to a lead 257. The lead 257, as shown in the upper portion of Fig. 5, is connected to one end of an actuating coil 258 of a relay P12. The other end of the actuating coil 258 being connected to power source A through the lead 226, actuation of that relay is effected. The operation of relay P12 closes normally open contacts 259 of that relay to complete a circuit from one terminal of power source B through a lead 260 (Fig. 5) to one end of an actuating coil 263 of the lose relay 59 through a lead 262. Since the other end of the actuating coil 263 is connected to power source B, the lose relay will be actuated thereby eifecting release of the coin relay 72 and the return of the circuit parts to their normal positions.

If the sum of the die digits is ll on the first play of a series, the current pulse from power source A is transmitted from the adding relay group 54 (Fig. 4) through the lead 211, which lead, as shown in Fig. 5, is connected through normally closed contacts 264 of the play relay 57 to a lead 265. The last mentioned lead is connected to one end of an actuating coil 266 of a relay P11 whereby actuation of the relay P11 is effected by current from power source A to close its normally open contacts 267. Contacts 267 of relay P11 complete a circuit through leads 254 and 260 from power source B to the actuating winding 255 of the win relay 58. It may be noted at this point that a relay P7 has normally open contacts 268 connected in parallel to the normally open contacts 267 of the relay P11 so that actuation of the relay P7 closes a circuit to the win relay 58 in a manner similar to that of the relay P11.

When the total of the die digits on the first play of a series is 7, the current pulse from power source A is transmitted from the adding relay contacts through a circuit comprising the lead 207, normally closed contacts 269 of the play relay 57 and a lead 270 to one 13 end of an actuating coil 271 of the relay P7, the other end of which actuating coil is connected to power source A through the lead 226. The resulting actuation of relay P7 effects operation of the relay, as explained.

Each actuation of the win relay 58 closes its normally open contacts 272 (Fig. to close a circuit from power source A to an actuating winding 273 to a stepby-step or ratchet switch 274 which comprises an operating part in the disclosed embodiment of my win indicator 30. Each such actuation of the ratchet switch moves a contact arm 275 into engagement with a succeeding one of a series of contacts 276; each contact being connected to a numerical indicator 277 which may, for example, comprise an electric lamp associated with an appropriate numerical indicator. The ratchet switch thus completes circuits from power supply leads 278 to individual and succeeding numerical indicators.

Normally open contacts 279 of the win relay close a circuit from power source A to a reset coil 280 of s the play indicator to return that indicator to its zero position each time the win relay is operated. Normally open contacts 282 of the lose relay 59 are connected in parallel to the contacts 279 of the win' relay, so that each operation of the lose relay also returns the play indicator to its Zero position. The lose" relay also has normally open contacts 283 which are connected in series with a reset coil 284 of the ratchet switch 274, so that each operation of the lose relay causes the ratchet switch of the win indicator 30 to return to its off position to which position it is normally biased.

The play results thus far considered have been related, in the main, and in their more final aspects, to the occurrences of the first of a series of plays. It being a peculiarity of the rules of playing craps that the first play is distinguished from others in respect to the appearance of various numbers comprising the sum of the die digits, it is necessary in the disclosed apparatus, and particularly the electrical operating portion thereof, to provide for the distinguishing of the results of first plays from those produced by later plays of a series. In the disclosed embodiment of my apparatus, a normally open cam switch 285 (Fig. 6) is actuated for a short interval of time by the operation of the motor 42 in timed relationship to the operations of the feeler switch 44 and current pulse producing relays 148 and 156. In relation to the provision of the current pulse through the circuits of the feeler switch contacts, die relay group contacts, adding relay group contacts and actuating coils of the relays of the system group, the cam switch 285 is momentarily closed after the occurrence of the current pulse, to close a circuit from power source A to an actuating coil 286 of the play relay 57. This circuit is through leads 293 and 294 in Figs. 5 and 6.

It being recalled that actuation of either the win or lose relays 58 and 59 effects de-energization of the coin relays 72, it becomes one of the functions of that coin relay to distinguish the plays of one series from the plays of another. Following the first play of a series which does not effect actuation of either the win or lose relays 58 and 59, and consequently does not de-energize the coin relay 72, actuation of the play relay 57 by cam switch 285 closes a holding circuit for that relay through normally open contacts 287 of that relay and normally open contacts 288 of the coin relay 72. It is the normally open contacts 288 of the coin relay 72 which prevent the play relay 57 from being locked in its actuated position following a Win or lose on the first play of a series. On the other hand, in any series of play involving a point, the play relay 57 is locked in its actuated position subsequent to the production of the results of the first play and until a play occurs which results in a win or a loss subsequent to that first play.

On the first play of a series, the current pulse carried by lead 160 to the contacts by relay group 47 (Fig. 3) and thence to selected contacts of the adding relay group 54 is from the negative terminal of power source A and passes through normally closed contacts 289 of the play relay 57. Upon being actuated after the recording of the first play, lead 160 is connected through normally open contacts 290 of the play relay 57 to the positive terminal of power source B. Hence, while the play relay is in its actuated position the current pulses transmitted through the contacts of die relay groups 47 to the selected contacts of the adding relay group 54 and to selected contacts of the system group relays are from power source B rather than power source A.

As was previously explained, the occurrence of a point number on the first play of a series effected actuation of one of the point relays P4, P5, P6, P8, P9, or P10 to close the normally open contacts 247, 248, 249, 250, 252 or 253 of the selected point relay, which relay was locked in its actuated position. The occurrer'ice of that same point number on a later play of the same series and before the occurrence of a 7 causes a current pulse from power source B to pass through the closed contacts 247, 248, 249, 250, 252 or 253 of the actuated point relay P4, P5, P6, P8, P9 or P10. In this event, the current pulse from power source B is transmitted to lead 254 and through that lead to the actuating coil 255 of the win relay 58, to produce actuation of that relay.

If a 7 occurs prior to the repetition of a point" number in any series, and after the first play of a series, the pulse of current from power source B which is carried from the contacts of the adding relay group 54 by lead 207 (Fig. 4) passes through normally open contacts 292 of the actuated play relay 57 to actuating coil 263 of the lose relay 59, to effect actuation of the latter relay.

If the summation of the die digits is 11 on a play subsequent to the first play of a series and before a point number is repeated in the series, the pulse of current from power source B which is carried by lead 211 (Figs. 4 and 5) produces no results, because the circuit through that lead is broken by the normally closed contacts 264 of the play relay 57 while the play relay is actuated. Likewise, on play subsequent to the first play of a series, the numbers 2, 3 and 12 produce no results because the circuit of lead 212 is broken by contacts 256 of the play relay 57 while that relay is operated.

Any play in a series which results in a win or a loss breaks the holding circuit of the coin relay 72 and, in turn, breaks the holding circuit of the play relay 57. When a point number has been established with the accompanying actuation of one of the point relays, a win or loss effects de-energization of the actuated one of those point relays as a result of the opening of contacts 83 of the coin relay. The relays of the die and adding groups 47, 48 and 54 being actuated for only relatively short periods of time by current pulses produced through the contacts of the relays 148 and 156, those relays return to their normal positions during the operating cycle of each play. As previously explained, the shaker control circuit of Fig. 6 is prevented from being operated after completion of a series of plays and before the deposit of a coin by the opening of contacts 77 of the coin relay. The motor driven cam switch 80 also returns to its normal position and stops the operation of the motor at the end of the operating cycle of each play.

Having described the electrical circuits and operation of a preferred embodiment of my invention, reference is now made more particularly to Figs. 1 and 7 to 22 inclusive of the drawings in connection with the following and more detailed description of preferred structural and mechanical aspects of my amusement apparatus. As shown in Figs. 1, 16, 17, 21 and 22, the top panel 33 of the housing 25 has a circular opening 300 therein over which the transparent dome 34 is located. For securing the dome 34 in place relative to the panel 33, it is secured in a groove 302 in the top surface of a mounting ring 303 and the mounting ring is secured in the panel opening 300.

Below the panel 33 and adjacent opposite sides of the mounting ring 303, support plates 304 and 305 are secured to the lower surface of the plate 33 and extend downwardly therefrom in substantially parallel relationship to one another. Dice supporting plates 306 and 307 are mounted between and carried by the support plates 304 and 305 below the opening 300 and in spaced relationship to the panel 33. By preference, the dice supporting plates 306 and 307 are disposed in coplanar relationship, substantially parallel to the surface of the panel 33 and have substantially straight end edges 308 and 309 respectively which abut in a plane extending substantially across a diameter of the opening 300. In order to provide for the exposure of the indicia on aseaeee the lower surfaces of the dice and 36, as shown in Figs. 15 and 21, the plate 306 is slidably mounted in opposed channels 310 and 312 in the support plates 304 and 305. As depicted in Fig. 14, tension springs 313 and 314 having opposed ends secured to means such as downwardly projecting pins 315 and 316 on the lower surfaces of the plates 306 and 307 respectively bias the plate 306 to its normal position against the end of the plate 307. In its movement away from the plate 307, the plate 306 is limited by a stop pin 317 which is secured to a block 318 on the lower surface of the panel 33 and disposed for engagement with a projecting tab 319 secured to and projecting downwardly from the lower surface of the linearly movable plate 306. When separated to a position such that the tab 319 engages the stop pin 317, as illustrated in Figs. 15 and 21, the space between the edges 308 and 309 of the plates 306 and 307 is so related to the size of the dice used in the apparatus that when the dice are centrally positioned over that space, all of the spot positions are exposed through the space and marginal portions of the dice surfaces overlie the plates 306 and 307 for support.

In order to provide for the shaking or random agitation of the dice 35 and 36, within the dome 34, surface plates 320 and 322 of a combined size larger than the area of the opening 300 are disposed in face to face relationship against the upper surfaces of the supporting plates 306 and 307 and have substantially straight end edges 324 and 325 in flush relationship to the edges 308 and 309 respectively of plates 306 and 307. At ends opposed to the edges 324 and 325, the surface plates 320 and 322 are hingedly supported for swinging movement away from the plates 306 and 307 by relatively light resilient strips 326 and 327; the ends of the strips being secured to the surface plates and to leveling blocks 328 and 329, which blocks are secured to the supporting plates 306 and 307 respectively. By preference, buttons or pads 330 and 332 are secured to the lower surfaces of the surface plates 320 and 322 and are exposed through openings 333 and 334 in the support plates 306 and 307 respectively.

Below the line of division between the dice supporting plates 306 and 307, a bracket 335 is secured to the support plate 304 by fastening means such as a screw 336 (Fig. 22), which bracket has secured thereto and carries the dice shaking electromagnet 105 referred to in connection with the operation of the electrical circuit. Preferably the electromagnet 105 has a core 337 and a yoke 338 which form a magnetic circuit. An armature 339 is resiliently supported by a leaf spring 340 from bracket 335 and at a position normally spaced from and aligned with the core 337 and yoke 338. Projecting from the unsupported end of the armature 339 is a hammer plate 342 aligned for engagement with the ends of linearly movable rods 343 and 344, which rods are normally aligned for engagement with the buttons or pads 330 and 332 on the surface plates. The projecting portions 345 on the bracket 335 and projecting arms 346 secured to the support plate 304 provide bearings 347 and 348 in which the rods 343 and 344 are slidable so that vibratory movement of the armature 339 and hammer plate 342 causes that hammer plate to strike the ends of the rods 343 and 344 to drive them intermittently against the buttons 330 and 332 thereby to produce a vigorous vibratory movement of the surface plates 320 and 322. Such movement of those surface plates throws the dice about within the dome 34 in a random manner and with relatively vigorous action.

After the dice have been thus shaken within the dome 34 for a limited period, they come to rest on the surface plates 320 and 322 within the area of the mounting ring 303. Within that limiting area, the dice may fall to rest at any position. A mechanism is thus required for sliding the dice across the smooth upper surfaces of the surface plates 320 and 322 to adjacent positions over the abutting edges of the surface and supporting plates in alignment for engagement by the feeler switch 44. For positioning and gripping the dice 35 and 36 before and during the operation of the feeler switch 44, I prefer to utilize two relatively movable dice positioning and gripping fingers 349 and 350 which are depicted in dif ferent operating positions in Figs. 14 and 15 and one of which is shown in Fig. 10. As depicted in Figs. 13 and 21, the mid-portions of the support plates 304 and 305 are cut-away adjacent the panel 33 to provide spaces such as 352 through which the dice positioning and gripping fingers extend longitudinally in spaced relationship relative to the lower surface of the panel 33 and the edges of the support plates. By preference, the spacing of the dice positioning and gripping fingers 349 and 350 relative to the top surfaces of the surface plates 320 and 322 and the lower surface of the panel 33 is such that those fingers engage the vertical mid-portions of the dice so that they do not have an appreciable tendency to tip the dice over as they are moved or to have the dice slip therefrom as they are firmly gripped.

Each of the dice positioning and gripping fingers 349 and 350 is supported for both linear and swinging movement toward and from opposite sides of the area in which the dice are confined. That is, at one end the dice positioning and gripping finger 349 has a stud 353 secured thereto and projecting from opposite faces thereof. Likewise the dice positioning and gripping finger 350 has a stud 354 secured to one of its ends and projecting from opposite faces thereof. As depicted in Figs. 13, 14 and 15, the opposite end portions of the studs 353 and 354 are respectively slidable linearly in a channel 355 in the lower surface of the panel 33 and guided by and between opposed edges 356, 357, 358 and 359 of guide plates 360, 362, 363 and 364 respectively which guide plates, as shown in Fig. 13, are secured to the lower surface of the panel 33 in spaced relationship thereto. It is to be noted that the dice positioning and gripping finger 349 is retained and movable between the panel 33 and the guide plates 360 and 362, while the dice positioning and gripping finger 350 is movably carried by the panel 33 and the guide plates 363 and 364.

In the separated or open position of the dice positioning and gripping fingers which is depicted in Fig. 14 and which is the normal position of those fingers, the location thereof is established by stops. That is, a lever arm 365 is secured to the lower end of the stud 353 and projects angularly with reference to the longitudinal dimension of the finger to engage a locating stop 366 which is secured to the lower surface of the panel 33 through a spacing block 367 (Figs. 13 and 14). A hook 368 which is secured to and projects angularly from the lever arm 365 at a position near the stud 353 serves as an anchor for one end of a tension spring 369, which tension spring holds the lever arm 365 against the end of the stop 366 when the fingers are in their normal positions and swing the finger 349 inwardly of the dice carrying area as the finger is moved linearly toward the dice carrying area. Likewise, the dice positioning and gripping finger 350 is provided with a similarly constructed and mounted lever arm 370 which engages a stop 372 and has thereon a projecting hook 373 to which a tension spring 374 is connected. The other end of the tension spring 374 is anchored to a pin 375 secured to the lower surface of the panel 33, while the other end of the tension spring 369 is secured to the projecting end of a shaft 376 mounted on the panel 33 and which also provides a support for a part of an actuating linkage 377.

Movement and control of the position of the dice positioning and gripping finger 349 is accomplished through movement of a bell crank 373 supported for rotational movement by the shaft 376 and having an end portion 379 which engages the stud 353. In order to provide some flexibility in the gripping action of the fingers 349 and 350 against the opposite sides of the dice and in order to limit the accuracy required in the manufacture and adjustment of the gripping fingers, a lever 380 is mounted for rotational movement on and relative to the bell crank 378 by a pin 382 and has a surface opposed to the portion 379 of the bell crank, between which portion and surface the stud 353 is engaged. A spring 383 having one end connected to the lever 380 and its other end anchored to the bell crank biases the lever against the stud 353 and gives to allow some over-travel of the bell crank after the dice have been gripped, as shown in Fig. 15. A bell crank 384 has a bifurcated end 385 which straddles the stud 354 and is carried for rotational movement relative to the panel 33 by a shaft 386 secured to that panel. The latter bell crank comprises a part of a linkage adapted to the control and actuation of the dice positioning and gripping finger 350. A cam 387 adjustably secured to the stud 354 serves as a variable stop for controlling the limit of inward movement of the dice positioning and gripping finger 350. Between the extreme limits of movement which are illustrated in Figs. 14 and 15, the positioning of the fingers 34; and 350 are somewhat determined by cam surfaces 388 and 389 which are formed on the outer edges of the guide plates 362 and 363 respectively, and which cam surfaces are engaged by cam followers 390 and 392 rotatably secured to the extending ends of the dice positioning and gripping fingers 350 and 349 respectively.

In the preferred structure of my dice positioning and gripping fingers, per se, as depicted in Figs. 10, 11 and 12, the body of each dice positioning and gripping finger comprises an elongated and substantially flat sheet metal strip 393 cut away along one side to present dice engaging edges 394 and 395 disposed in substantially right angular relationship to one another. At the supported end of the finger, through which the supporting stud for the finger extends, the finger is reinforced by gripping plates 396 and 397 secured to one face thereof, which grpping plates preferably hold a dice gripping block 398 of a material which desirably has a relatively high friction coeificient and resilience. An example of one material satisfactory for the dice gripping purpose is cork. Another strip of the dice gripping material 399 is clamped to a face of the finger by clamping strip 400 and extends along the mid-portion of the edge 394. The block 398 and strip 399 of the dice gripping material project beyond and present edges substantially parallel to the edges 395 and 394 of the finger. The strip 399 is utilized principally for turning the dice to a position for gripping during inward movement of the fingers, while the blocks 398 are used principally for applying the gripping force to the dice. As indicated in Figs. 10 and 11, a channel 402 is preferably provided along the edge of each finger at the end thereof which is supported so that the two opposed fingers may nest together when the dice are gripped therebetween It is to be understood that the dice positioning and gripping fingers grip and firmly hold the dice 35 and 36 between their opposed gripping edges, and in proper relationship to the dividing line between the dice supporting plates 306 and 307, while the dice supporting plate and its attached surface plate 320 are retracted to the position shown in Figs. 15 and 21 and while the feeler switch 44 is raised to a position of engagement with the dice.

Although there are various ways in which a feeler switch for this purpose might be constructed, a preferred structural embodiment of my feeler switch is illustrated in Figs. 7, 8 and 9. As there depicted, the switch comprises superposed blocks of insulating material 403, 404, 405 and 406 secured together and to a supporting yoke 407 by fastening means such as screws 408, which screws extend through the yoke and blocks 406, 405 and 404 and are threaded into the block 403. An electrically conductive metal plate 409 which serves as the common contact of the various switches L1, L2, L3, L4, L5, R1, R2, R3, R4 and R5 (Fig. 3) is interposed between the insulating blocks 404 and 405, and is secured in place by the screws 408 which extend through openings 410 therein and are preferably insulated therefrom. Although the positions of the switches are somewhat different in the circuit diagram of Fig. 3 and the structural embodiment shown in Figs. 7 and 9, those switches are referred to in the figures by like reference characters to associate switches having the same functional purposes.

In addition to the metal contact plate 409, the switches each include terminal elements such as 412, 413, 414, 415 and 416 carried by the block 406 and projecting therefrom for making external connections to the various switches. Also, a terminal element 417 is secured to the plate 409 and extends through the insulating blocks 405 and 406 for making circuit connections to the plate. Each terminal element, like the terminal element 412 in Fig. 7, preferably has a longitudinal bore 418 therein which serves as a bearing for movably supporting a stem such as 419 and 420 of a movable contact such as 422 and 423 having a mid-portion engageable with the plate 409 for making electrical contact therewith. The movable contacts such as 422 and 423 are biased into engagement with the metal plate 409 by resilient means such as compression springs 424 and 425 disposed between the heads of the contact elements 18 and the terminal elements within bores 426 and 427 in the block 405.

On the sides of the plate 409 opposite the movable contacts 422 and 423, the block 404 has bores 428 and 429 which slidably support body portions of switch actuating plungers such as 430 and 432. The portions of reduced diameter, such as 433 and 434 of the switch actuating plungers extend through openings 435, 436, 437, 438, 439, 440, 442, 443, 444 and 445 in the metal plate 409 and engage the aligned movable contacts of the switch. Each switch actuating plunger has a feeler stem such as 446 and 447 mounted for longitudinal movement in a bore such as 448 and 449 in the block 403 and normally biased to a position projecting beyond the surface of the block 403 by its co-acting movable contact such as 422 and 423.

As previously explained, the feeler stems and switches of the feeler switch are relatively disposed for alignment with predetermined ones of the normal spot positions of dice of a predetermined size. As indicated in Figs. 7 and 8, the spots of the dice are preferably indented into the surface, as depicated at 450. The size and the normal projecting lengths of the feeler stems are such that when aligned with a spot indentation, the stem will project into that indentation and will not move its co-acting movable contact away from its contacting position against the plate 409. Thus, the movable contacts remain engaged with the contact plate when their respective plunger stems extend into aligned spot indentations of the dice. On the other hand, when no spot indentation is encountered by a plunger stem, that stem is moved inwardly against the biasing force of the compression spring of its co-acting movable contact to move that contact from its position of engagement with the plate 409. In Fig. 7, the feeler stems 446 and 447 and their co-acting movable contacts are shown in open and closed positions respectively.

As indicated in Figs. 7 and 8, the yoke 407 is secured to the end of a shaft 452 which shaft, as depicted in Figs. 17 and 21, is carried for linear movement toward and from the support plates 306 and 307 by a yoke 453 secured to the support plate 304. The normal position of the feeler switch 44 is such that the feeler stems are spaced below the surfaces of the dice supporting plates 306 and 307. Upward movement of the shaft 452, however, moves the feeler switch upwardly when the dice supporting plate 306 is retracted; the upper position thereof being shown in Figs. 8 and 21, wherein the block 403 is between the dice supporting plates 306 and 307 and the feeler stems are in engagement with the dice.

At the lower end of the shaft 452 and below the lower surface of the yoke 453, a bracket 454 is fixedly secured thereto by fastening means such as a pin 455 (Fig. 17). At one side of the shaft 452, a set screw 456 is threaded into the bracket 454 in alignment for engagement with the yoke 453 and is provided with a locknut 451 to provide an adjustable stop for determining the upper limit of movement of the feeler switch toward the dice. On the opposite side of the shaft, the bracket is provided with a projecting portion 457 (Figs. 16 and 17) disposed in angular relationship to the axis of the shaft 45 The actuation of the dice positioning and gripping fingers, movement of the dice supporting plate 306 and movement of the feeler switch 44 are accomplished in timed relationship to one another and to the operation of the electrical parts of the apparatus by the motor 42. As depicted in Figs. 13 and 16, this motor is suspended below the operating mechanical parts of the apparatus by a motor supporting bracket 458 secured to the support plate 305 by fastening means such as screws 459. By preference, the lower end of the bracket 458 is provided with a slotted motor receiving opening 460 in which the motor 42 is clamped by fastening means such as a screw 462. As illustrated in Fig. 18, the motor supporting bracket 458 also carries at a position adjacent the motor a bearing sleeve 463 in which a shaft 464 is rotatably mounted. At one end of the shaft 464 a gear 465 is drivingly mounted in meshing relationship with a pinion 466 on the end of the motor shaft; said pinion and gear being of proportionate sizes to reduce the operating speed of the apparatus parts in relation to the normal motor speed. Adjacent the gear 465 and drivingly connected to the shaft is a crank arm 467 which, at a position eccentric to the axis of the shaft 464, has a crank bearing 468.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/145.00D, 361/202
International ClassificationA63F9/04, A63F3/02, G07F17/34
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2003/00675, A63F9/0406, A63F2003/00665, G07F17/3213, A63F2250/14
European ClassificationG07F17/32C2F2, A63F9/04B