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Publication numberUS2695783 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 30, 1954
Filing dateJul 27, 1953
Priority dateJul 27, 1953
Publication numberUS 2695783 A, US 2695783A, US-A-2695783, US2695783 A, US2695783A
InventorsSerafin John L
Original AssigneeSerafin John L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Simulated aircraft
US 2695783 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1954 J. SERAFIN SIMULATED AIRCRAFT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 27, 1953 Fig.

John L. Sara/1h INVENTOR.

Nov. 30, 1954 J. SERAFIN 2,695,783

SIMULATED AIRCRAFT Filed July 27, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 John L .Seraf/h 1N VEN TOR.

United States Patent This invention relates'-'t'o"a t-iltingplatform 'and particularlyto a simulated flight trainerin which'a platformtilts in response to the'operation of 'a stickgbya student.

ln'?the' operation of simulated'flight trainers it has heretofore been customary-to'provideza control mecha nism-operating various controls .operating through pres sure devices bellows and the*like;.to move the simulated vehicle in response to the movement'ofthe control stick;

The present device relates to a mechanically'controlled device in which the positionof the-simulated trainer. is;

stick because:

directly responsive to the movement of. the of mechanical connection thereto.

In'constructing the device according to the present invention, a control platform is mounted for universal movement on a pivot post and-secured in yieldingpre-g,

determined-relation thereto by means :ofra plurality of control platformmndi-ar control .stick. is universally; mounted' with respect tothe' tilting platform and is ,pro-

springs and a tilting'platform is rigidly mounted on-the vided .with control -.cables" which-"pass overcablepguides'" in the control platform so that "movement of the stick depresses the'edges .of the control platform causing tilting" motion of the tiltingplatform' inresponsepto movement ofthe stick-x "g Itisaccordingly an object of the invention to provide an improved'simulated flight traineru 1 It is a further object of the invention to; provide a self-operated amusementdevice.

It' is a--further-object*-of the invention to :provide, a platform which. may; be readily tilted and corrected by means of a student mounted thereon.

It is a further object' of the'invention to -provide a tilting platform 'havinga'simula'tedbody mounted' thereon.

It is a further object of the invention to'provide. a' simulated body having means for varying the balance or center of gravity thereof. I W i Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of the present invention.willaberapparentfrom the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing in which:

F'gure 11- 1s a side elevation partially in s ectiori of platform .in normal-position;----

Figure 32 is a similar 'view "of position; .2.

the. platform in:-

Figure-3 is an enlarged--cross section taken substan- .afid

Figure 4 is an enlarged elevation partially in section of the control stick and the locking means mounted therein. a

In the exemplification according to the invention a base platform 10 is secured by a desired method in fixed relation to the ground or other position in which it is mounted. A pivot post 12 is rigidly fixed on the base 10 and extends vertically therefrom. A control platform 14 is mounted for universal motion by any suitable type of universal joint herein shown as a ball 16 fixed on the top of a post 12 and a socket 1S engaging the ball 16 and having a flange 20 rigidly secured to the platform- 14 so that the platform 14 must necessarily move relative to the ball to move about. The plurality of springs 24 are arranged in annular formation coaxial with the post 12 and are tensioned so that the platform 14 will normally be in parallel relation to the base platform 10. Obviously the springs 24 may have various tensions so that the control platform 14 does not extend parallel to the baselO but for purposes ofsimplified description it will be so described;

Tilting "platform26 is maintained in spaced relation to thetcontrol platform-14"by means' of a plurality of posts herein indicated as forwardposts 28 and30, central" posts 32 and 34 and rearward posts 36 and 38, although.

obviously any suitable arrangement of posts oreven a single post. could be utilized. A control stick 40 extends through -'-the platform 26 and -is*connected thereto by means of aball and socket joint 42 so that the stick 40 has universal movement with respect to platform 26 and may be moved in any direction for a purpose presently to be described.

The stick 40 ispreferably hollow for apurpose also presently to be described and extends into proximity with the universal joint between the platform 14 and the post 12 and is provided with a connection plate 44 having a plurality of .eyes 46 mountedaround the periphery theifof in annular formation coaxial with the control stic 40. a

The control platform 14 is 1 provided with a plurality of cable guides herein illustrated as radially placed slots 50 arranged adjacent to the periphery of the platform 14 andeach of. the slots 50 is provided with a sheave 52 mounted on an axle 54 so. that the sheave may readily turn about the-axle 54w Slots 50 and the sheaves 52 are arranged in ,-radial formation about the universal joint betweenthe p1atform14 and the post 12-.with .the" slots 50-arranged in annular formation coaxially over Control cables 56 are securedto the. eyes 46 and are entrained through the guides'by means of entrainment over the sheaves 52. Lower ends of the cables 56 are.

connected to eyes 58' preferably mounted in the base 10 in proximity to the bottom of the post 12 but obviously maybe connectedeither on:- the post or in any place adjacent to. the junction ofthe-base10'and-"the post 12:

In order to secure the, tilting platform so that an operator may descend from or ascend onto the platform,

66in which extends ,a control rod 68 terminating in a' projecting lockpin 7Q. The lower end of the stick 40 is counterbored at 7210 ,-prov ide. a..seat for compression spring 74 for projecting the lock pin 70 outward through an aperture 76 in the member 44. A handlle 78.is longitudinally slidable in a "slot 80 adjacent the-top of the control stick 40 so that the handle 78 may .be raised to remove the locking pin 70 from operative position. Any suitable arrangement maybe provided for.maintaining the handle in elevated the device by a trainee.

For simplicity of illustration the springshave been" shown as of equal tension and length so that the platform 14 is maintained substantially parallel to the base platform 10. However, it is obvious that these springs might be of various lengths for various purposes to give peculiar biases to the operation of the device. Likewise the control cables 56 have been shown as of equal length so that the platform 14 is at horizontal position when the stick 40 is in vertical position. Obviously these cables may be variously adjusted to give set biases to the control stick 40 to simulate side winds and the like.

In order to make the tilting platform more realistic a simulated body is mounted on the platform 26. The simulated body 90 herein illustrates a trainer type plane and has extending wings 92.

In the operation'of the device the platform 26 will be locked in rigid position by means of the lock pin 70 after which an operator will take his position on the platform 26 and elevate the handle 78 to release the platform for motion. Any motion of the stick, as for example pushing forward, will cause the bottom end of the stick to move backwards and shorten the control ropes 56 in a backward direction and lengthen the control position during the utilization of 3 ropes 56 in a forward direction so that the forward end of the platform 14 will be pressed downwardly while the rearward end of the platform will be elevated causing the plane to extend into a nose dive formation. Thus the stick has a universal motion, obviously the body 90 may be moved into any desired simulated position and may be readily corrected by correcting the stick to its normal central position. Since the center of gravity of the device, including the pilot, is at the universal joint with the control platform and the post 12 movement of the operator in moving the handle forward will move the center of gravity forward and assist in the operation of moving the simulated body to an angular position. This will simultaneously release the tension in the springs 24 of the forward end of the platform and increase the tensions in the springs 24 at the back side of the platform. To correct this situation the pilot will move his weight backwards moving the stick backward so that the cables 56 will again adjust themselves and the tension springs 24 will assist in moving the platform until the springs are substantially evenly tensed. Backward movement of the pilot of course shifts the center of gravity rearwardly as he moves backwards so as to assist in the orientation of the platform.

When the lesson has been completed handle 78 will be released and the control stick moved into proper position to lock the ball and socket joints together to rigidify the structure so that the student may descend in safety from the platform 26.

For the purpose of exemplification a particular embodiment of the invention has been shown and described according to best present understanding thereof. However, it will be apparent to those skilled in the arts that various changes and modifications in the construction and arrangement of parts thereof may be readily resorted to without departing from the true spirit of the invention.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. An amusement device comprising a fixed base, a pivot post fixed on said base, a ball top on said pivot post, a socket secured on said ball top, a control platform fixed on said socket, spring means yieldingly urging said control platform into substantially parallel relation with said base, a tilting platform spaced from and rigidly secured to said control platform, a control stick extending through said tilting platform, a ball and socket connection between said control stick and said tilting platform, a plurality of sheaves mounted on said control platform, said sheaves being arranged in annular formation and having radial position with respect to said socket, a plurality of control cables secured to said control stick and entrained over said sheaves, said cables being secured in proximity to said pivot post.

2. An amusement device comprising a fixed base, a

pivot post fixed on said base, a ball top on said pivot post, a socket secured on said ball top, a control platform fixed on said socket, spring means yieldingly urging said control platform into substantially parallel relation with said base, a tilting platform spaced from and rigidly secured to said control platform, a control stick extend ing through said tilting platform, a ball and socket connection between said control stick and said tilting platform, a plurality of sheaves mounted on said control 4 i 1 platform, said sheaves being arranged in annular formation and having radial position with respect to said socket, a plurality of control cables secured to said control stick and entrained over said sheaves, said cables being secured in proximity to said pivot post, a simulated vehicle body mounted on said tilting platform.

3. An amusement device comprising a fixed base, a pivot post fixed on said base, a ball top on said pivot post, a socket secured on said ball top, a control platform fixed on said socket, spring means yieldingly urging said control platform into substantially parallel relation with said base, a tilting platform spaced from and rigidly secured to said control platform, a control stick extending through said tilting platform, a ball and socket connection between said control stick and said tilting platform, a plurality of sheaves mounted on said control platform, said sheaves being arranged in annular formation and having radial positions with respect to said socket, a plurality of control cables secured to said control stick and entrained over said sheaves, said cables being secured in proximity to said pivot post, a bore in said ball coaxial with said pivot post, said socket having an aperture alignable with said bore, a lock pin mounted in said control stick and projectible into engagement with said aperture and said bore.

4. A simulated flight device comprising a fixed pivot post, a control platform, a universal joint connecting said control platform to said pivot post, resilient means yieldingly urging said control platform into a predetermined relation to said pivot post, a tilting platform, fixed in spaced relation to said control platform, a control stick extending through said tilting platform, a universal joint connecting said stick to said tilting platform, a plurality of cable guides mounted in said control platform in annular relation to said pivot post, a plurality of control cables connected to said control stick, said cables extending through the respective guides and being secured in proximity to said pivot post.

5. A simulated flight device comprising a fixed pivot post, a control platform, a universal joint connecting said control platform to said pivot post, resilient means yieldingly urging said control platform into a predetermined relation to said pivot post, a tilting platform, fixed in spaced relation to said control platform, a control stick extending through said tilting platform, a universal joint connecting said stick to said tilting platform, a plurality of cable guides mounted in said control platform in annular relation to said pivot post, a plurality of control cables connected to said control stick, said cables extending through the respective guides and being secured in proximity to said pivot post, means operable from said tilting platform for locking said control platform to said pivot post.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,825,462 Link Sept. 29, 1931 2,409,938 Hutter Oct. 22, 1946 2,422,552 Jensen June 17, 1947 2,441,401 Eckstein May 11, 1948 2,524,238 Soule Oct. 3, 1950

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1825462 *Mar 12, 1930Sep 29, 1931Link Jr Edwin ACombination training device for student aviators and entertainment apparatus
US2409938 *Jul 24, 1942Oct 22, 1946Hutter William HPilot trainer
US2422552 *Aug 16, 1943Jun 17, 1947California Aero Glider Co IncPreflight pilot training aircraft apparatus
US2441401 *Aug 6, 1946May 11, 1948Eckstein Ward EToy aircraft
US2524238 *Nov 15, 1946Oct 3, 1950Jessie Chess SouleFlight trainer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2949298 *Nov 3, 1958Aug 16, 1960Speelman Daniel LOscillator
US3064471 *May 15, 1959Nov 20, 1962Northrop CorpFlight simulator and test facility
US3137500 *Jun 27, 1960Jun 16, 1964Norstan Res & Dev CompanyAviation type amusement device
US3225458 *May 21, 1962Dec 28, 1965Bolkow Gmbh FaHelicopter training device
US3231987 *Feb 13, 1961Feb 1, 1966Schott Walter LDriver training apparatus
US3295224 *Dec 7, 1964Jan 3, 1967Franklin InstituteMotion simulator
US3479750 *Feb 6, 1964Nov 25, 1969Aetna Casualty & Surety CoAutomotive vehicle simulator for demonstrating automatic self-centering of steerable automobile wheels
US4461470 *Jun 20, 1983Jul 24, 1984Mark E. AstrothSystem for adding realism to video display
US4584896 *Sep 6, 1985Apr 29, 1986Howard LetovskyPivot and translation motion control apparatus
US4887967 *Mar 16, 1989Dec 19, 1989Bernard Fried Racing Enterprises, Inc.High performance motorcycle simulator
US5006072 *Jun 27, 1989Apr 9, 1991Bernie Fried Racing Enterprises, Inc.High performance motorcycle simulator and helmut display
WO2000034934A1 *Dec 7, 1999Jun 15, 2000Thomson CsfMovement actuating device with limited load displacement along one to six degrees of freedom
WO2008139257A1 *Nov 26, 2007Nov 20, 2008David Graham BennetMotion simulator
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/55, 472/130, 74/491, 248/346.6
International ClassificationG09B9/02, G09B9/12, A63G13/00, A63G13/08
Cooperative ClassificationG09B9/12, A63G13/08
European ClassificationA63G13/08, G09B9/12