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Publication numberUS2696368 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 7, 1954
Filing dateFeb 3, 1953
Priority dateFeb 3, 1953
Publication numberUS 2696368 A, US 2696368A, US-A-2696368, US2696368 A, US2696368A
InventorsEdwards Ray C
Original AssigneeEdwards Ray C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radiator construction for use in convector heating systems
US 2696368 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. cJEDwARDs 2,696,368

STRUCTION FOR USE IN VECTOR HEATING SYSTEMS Filed Feb. s. 195s 4 8 9 SR. DW f, .V 2 n n, 2 n I/ D /ld/ lm /u E. n II/ /6 nu/ C ll/ Y 2 nh Y B. f G A 1| |h.. ,l .r Dm lll# .I 1 I In/h-llll 1|! d I lm .Hm 7 wfw 7 fl .y

RADIATOR CON CON Dec. 7, 1954 United States Patent 0 RADIATOR CGNSTRUCTION FOR USE IN CONVECTOR HEATING SYSTEMS Ray C. Edwards, Pompton Plains, N. J. Application February 3,'1953,'Serial No. 334,874 5 Claims. (Cl. 257-133) This. invention relatesv to space heating systems for heating rooms or analogous enclosures, and more particularly to that type of heating system known in the .art as baseboard convectors wherein heat exchange means such as finned tubes are arranged along a wall or walls of an enclosure substantially at baseboard level,

above the floor, and a heating medium such as hot water or steam is circulated through the heat exchange means to heat the enclosure.

A principal disadvantage to heating systems of the baseboard convector type now in use and employing finned tubes is that in installing the units around a'room or enclosure. the finned tube elements and companionable connections and piping must be assembled -on the oor of the room prior to placing them in position on their supports in the enclosing structure. This is a cumbersome operation as the assembly of tubes and connections areL of the room and subsequently placingk the assembled,`

unit upon its supports.

In heating apparatus of this type now in use, the finned tubing is so supported that longitudinal movement thereof or of sections thereof is prevented. Such movement is caused by expansion when the heating medium is rst circulated through the tubes after it has been turned off, or the contraction of the tube during cooling after the circulation of the heating medium has been turned l, off, and thus such expansion or contraction causes undesirable nolses due to abrasive action or springing of the tubes and supports.

Another advantage of the present invention, is the employment of a novel type of support for the finned tubes whichwill permit unimpeded movement of the tubes relative to the supporting enclosures and thus eliminate such undesirable nolses.

A further advantage ofthe present invention is that the supports of the present invention may be employed with either round finned elements or with those wherein the tins are lipped as shown in my prior Patent No. 2,529,545, issued November 14,v 1950, andv that irrespective of the type of tube elements employed, they will be always centered with respect to the front and back of the enclosing enclosure or casing of the heating unit.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a novel, simple and inexpensively yconstructed damper and means for operatingit whereby the cross sectional area of the heated air outlet of the convection heating unit may be regulated. Y

With these and other objects in view, as may appear from the accompanying specification, the invention consists of various features of construction and combination of parts, which will be tirst described in connection with the accompanying drawings, showing a radiator construction for use in convector heating system of a preferred `form embodying the invention, and the featuresforming the invention will be specifically pointed out inthe claims.

r t 2,696,358 Ice Patented Dec. 7, 1954 In the drawings:

Figure l is a fragmentary front elevation of the rad1ator for use in convector heating systems.

Figure 2 is an end view of the radiator.

Figure 3 is an enlarged detail section taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary detail perspective view of a part of the radiator. y

Figure 5 is a fragmentary detail perspective view showing the damper and its operating mechanism.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, A indicates a fragment of a wall of a room or enclosure and B indicates the oor thereof. The baseboard convector heating device or radiator is placed along any one or more of the walls A of the enclosure as desired, substantially at baseboard level, that is, at a level on the wall A .which is normally occupied by the baseboard (not shown).

The heating unit or radiator includes a shallow casing including a backplate 1 attached to the wall A by suitable means such as screws 2. The upper edge portion of the backplate 1 is curved outwardly as shown at 3 to provide a heated air directing portion for directing the heated air into the enclosure. From the upper outer terminus of the curved portion 3 the backplate angles upwardly and inwardly as shown at 4 and from thence back to the wall A where it is bent to provide the attaching flange 5. The flange 5 is attached to the wall A by the material C used to form the interiorinish of the wall A or by any other suitable means.

t An angled supporting plate 6 is attached to the backf plate 1V at or near the rear lower terminal of the curved portion 3, and while only one of these angled supporting plates are shown in the drawings it is to be understood that any desired or required number of them may be provided, being spaced at suitable intervals along the length of the backplate 1.

The angled supporting plate 6 extends outwardly and upwardly from the backplate 1 as clearly shown in Figure 2 of the drawings and has a sharp pointed upwardly extending tongue 7 formed on its upper outer corner which engages in and beneath the upper rolled edge 8 of the frontplate 9 to removably support the upper edge portion of thelfrontplate 9 in proper spaced relation to the backp ate An adjustable support plate 10 is provided which has a slot 11 cut therein near its upper end by means of which it is adjustably connected to the backplate 1 by means of one of the screws 2. While only one adjustable supportplate 10 is shown in the drawings it is to be understood that any desired or required number of these plates may be provided, depending upon the length of the radiator. e

A pin or shaft-12 is carried by the adjustable supporting plate 10 and extends horizontally outward therefrom to the frontplate 9. A roller 13 is rotatably mounted upon the pin 12 and is held against longitudinal movement thereon by any suitable means such as pins y14. The roller 13 has a concave perimeter the curvature of which is designed or cut to approximately conform to .the curvature of the perimeter of the ns 15' on the finned tube 16'- through which the heating medium such as hot water or steam is circulated. i

The linned tube 16 may be of the conventional nned tube construction or it preferably is of the lipped tin type such as shown in my prior Patent No. 2,529,545 issued November 14,' 1950, and resting upon the concave surface of the rotatable roller 13, it may be moved longitudinally with ease to permit'attachment of the connections or connectors (not shown) at the corners of the enclosure when assembling the system, and also it may move' on or with the rotating rollers under expansion or contraction due to heat variances after' the assembly has been completed and during use.

The provision of the rotatable rollers as support for the iinned tube permits greatly 'simplified operation of construction or assembly of the system in an enclosure as hereinbefore referred to and eliminates undesirable noises during operation of the system also as hereinabove SO referred to.

The lower edge of the frontplate 9 is also rolled as shown at and novel means are provided for holding this lower edge in position.

A Cotter-pin type spring element or member 16 is inserted diametrically through the pin 12 and its legs 17 are spread and curved outwardly and' downwardly and engage between the upper inner terminus of the rolled edge l5 and the adjacent inner surface of the frontplate `as clearly shown in Figures 2 and 3 of the drawings to releasably hold the lower' portion of the frontplate 9 in position.

The angled support plate or bracket 6 has its attaching end 18 by means of which it s attached to the backplate 1 Wider than the width of the bracket 6 to form a tongue or extensionl and this tonguev 19 is rolled as clearly shown in Figures 4 and 5 of the drawings, to form one section of a hinge, which cooperates with the hinge' section forming rolled inner edge 20 of a damper 21. The interconnecting of the hinge sections 19 and 20 or swingably connect the damper 21 tol the bracket 6 and the back-plate 1. The damper 2'1 extends across the space between the backplate 1 and frontplate 9 from the lower terminal of the curved portion 3 and the upper rolled edge 8 and by adjusting the position of the damper 21 the cross-sectional area of the outlet space for the heated air into the enclosure may be regulated as desired.

A simple, inexpensive, and practical device is provided for adjusting the position of the damper 21`.

This device comprises a support 22 attached to the frontplate 9 and extending beyond its upper edge. A pin 23 is rotatably carried by the support 22 and has its inner end attached to an angled damper operating member 24 the angled end 2S of which engages the damper 21 so that when thel pin 23 is rotated the damper 21 will be moved. facilitate its manual rotation, and a spring 27 is coiled about the pin 23 between the frontplate 9 and the member 24 to hold the damper in adjusted positions by the pressure of the spring against the operating member 24.

If it is so desired a laterally extending damper supporting extension 28 may be formed upon the upper edge of the bracket or angular supporting plate 6, but this supporting extension 28 may be eliminated without departing from the spirit of the invention.

It will be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the specific construction or arrangement of parts shown, but that they may be widely modified within the invention defined by the claims.

What is claimed is:

l. In a space heating system for heating an `enclosure serve to pivotally including walls and a iloor, the combination of a ilat shallow casing for location substantially at baseboard level above the oor and extending along a Wall of the enclosure to be heated, said casing including a backplate for attachment to the wall, a supporting plate adjustably attached ried by said adjustable support plate, a roller rotatably carried by said pin, a heating medium circulating tube supported on said roller, a frontplate for said casing, a bracket carried by said backplate for releasably supporting the upper edge of said frontplate, and spring means carried by said pin for releasably engaging the lower edge portion of said frontplate.

2, In a space heating system for heating an enclosure including walls and a oor, the combination of a flat shallow casing for location substantially at baseboard level above the floor and extending along a wall of the enclosure to be heated, said casing including a backplate for attachment to the wall, a supporting plate adjustably attached to said backplate, a roller-carrying pin carried by said' adjustable support plate, a roller rotatably carried by saidv pin, a heating medium circu1ating tube supported on said roller, a frontplate for said casing, a bracket carried by said backplate for releasably supporting the upper edge of said frontplate, a spring member carried by said roller carrying pin and including a pair of diverging legs for releasably engaging the lower edge portion of said frontplate.

The pinl 23 has an enlarged head 26 to to said backplate, a roller carrying pin cariid 3. In a space heating system for heating an enclosure including walls and a oor, the combination of a at shallow casing for location substantially at baseboard level above the oor and extending along a Wall of the enclosure to be heated, said casing including a backplate for attachment to the wall, a supporting plate adjustably attached to said backplate, a roller-carrying pin carried by said adjustable support plate, a roller rotatably carried by said pin, a heating medium circulating tube supported on said roller, a frontplate for said casing, a bracket carried by said backplate for releasably supporting the upper edge of said frontplate, a cotterpinflike spring member extending through said roller carrying pin and having its leg portions spread outwardly and engaging the lower edge of said frontplate to provide a support for the frontplate.

4. In a space heating system for heating an enclosure including walls and a oor, the combination of a at shallow casing for location substantially atv baseboard level above the iioor and extending along a wall of the enclosure to be heated, said casing including a backplate for attachment to the Wall, a supporting plate adjustably attached to said backplate,A a roller-carrying pin carried by said adjustable` support plate, a roller rotatably carried by said pin, a heating medium circulating tube supported on said roller, a front plate for said casing, said frontplate having its upper and lower edges rolled inwardly, an angular supporting bracket rigidly carried by said' backplate` and having its outer end engaging said frontplate and shaped to releasably interlock with the upper rolled edge of the frontplate, a cotter-pin-like spring member carried by said roller carrying pin and having its legv portions spread outwardly and engaging the lower rolled edge ofl said frontplate to provide a releasable support. for the lower portion of the frontplate.

5. In` a space heating system for heating an enclosure including walls and a Hoor, the combination of a flat shallow casing for location substantially at baseboard level above the floor and extending along a wall of the enclosure to be heated, said casing including a backplate forl attachment to the wall, a supporting plate adjustably attached to. said backplate, a roller-carrying pin carried by said adjustable support plate, a roller rotatably carried by said pin, a heating mediumy circulating tube supported on said roller, a frontplate for said casing, said frontplate having its upper and lower edges rolled inwardly, an angular supporting bracket rigidly carried by said backplate and having its outer end engaging said frontplate and shaped to releasably interlock with the upper rolled edge of the frontplate, a cotter-pinlike spring member carried by said roller carrying pin and having. its leg portions spread outwardly and engaging the lower rolled edgeI of said frontplate to provide a releasable support for the lower portion of the frontplate, a rolled tongue formed upon said bracket to form a hinge section, a damper having a rolled edge forming a hinge section for cooperation with said tongue-for1ned hinge section to pivotally support said damper, means for pivotally moving said damper, and a spring cooperating with said damper moving means to hold. the damper in adjusted position.

References' Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 979,989 Muehr Dec. 27, 1910 1,633,032: Nordling June 21, 1927 1,971,841 Young Aug. 28, 1934 2,101,797 Kacena et al Dec. 7, 1937 2,113,240' Pierson et al. Apr. 5, 1938 2,116,302 Chernosky May 3, 1938 2,501,147 Tolan Mar. 21, 1950 OTHER REFERENCES Heating and Ventilatingy Magazine, November 1949, page 95.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US979989 *Dec 6, 1909Dec 27, 1910Lawrence J MuehrSupport for stringing cables.
US1633032 *Jul 19, 1926Jun 21, 1927Nordling Fridolf MBaseboard radiator for the rooms of buildings
US1971841 *Dec 27, 1932Aug 28, 1934Young Fred MDamper control device
US2101797 *Nov 7, 1936Dec 7, 1937Crane CoShutter for radiator enclosures and the like
US2113240 *Sep 27, 1937Apr 5, 1938Crane CoShutter for enclosures
US2116302 *May 4, 1936May 3, 1938Chernosky Frank EFluid conducting line
US2501147 *Apr 17, 1946Mar 21, 1950Warren Webster & CompanyRadiator bracket
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2835478 *Jan 6, 1955May 20, 1958Bemish George RFinned tube radiator supporting structure
US2935008 *Apr 18, 1958May 3, 1960Fender Orie AWarm air register
US2963276 *Sep 28, 1959Dec 6, 1960Embassy Steel Products IncFinned heating unit with guide rails
US3152636 *Aug 14, 1961Oct 13, 1964Slant Fin Radiator CorpHeat-exchange apparatus
US3250318 *Aug 17, 1961May 10, 1966Allied Thermal CorpBaseboard heater
US4234039 *Mar 31, 1978Nov 18, 1980Sensotherm AbRadiator
US4669533 *Feb 1, 1985Jun 2, 1987Karl HehlCooling and filtering unit for hydraulic drive fluid
US5992509 *Feb 23, 1994Nov 30, 1999Fennesz; ManfredBaseboard heating with a wooden cover
US20070289723 *Apr 5, 2007Dec 20, 2007Stephan KosterInternal heat exchanger with calibrated coil-shaped fin tube
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/55, 248/55, 165/67, 454/288, 165/184, 165/96
International ClassificationF24D19/04, F28D1/04, F24D19/00, F28D1/053
Cooperative ClassificationF24D19/04, F28D1/053
European ClassificationF28D1/053, F24D19/04