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Publication numberUS2697231 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 21, 1954
Filing dateJun 25, 1953
Priority dateJun 25, 1953
Publication numberUS 2697231 A, US 2697231A, US-A-2697231, US2697231 A, US2697231A
InventorsStrand Carl A
Original AssigneeStrand Carl A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lightweight bathtub construction
US 2697231 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 21, 1954 A. STRAND 2,697,231

LIGHTWEIGHT BATHTUB CONSTRUCTION Fled June 25. 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 fz-.7 ver: Tar Car] ./7? fayz cz? F 7 @w g1 m@ f Dec. 21, 1954 Q A. STRAND 2,697,231

LIGHTWEIGHT BATHTUB CONSTRUCTION Filed June ,25, 1953 w- T w25-7 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 amalnu'u al el m .".r a i l l assi/4515( 35635 (@Ph P4P-T+S 45 Mffffffffw wiwi n u WM n u n nl'lw'n v n www W n am A, 55mm" United States Patent O This invention relates to an improved light-weight bathtub construction, and more particularly, to an improved structure for supporting 'the light-weight `bathtub or the like receptacle, and to an improved method of preparing such structure.

As is well known, the ordinary bathtub is a very heavy cast iron receptacle, wlii'cl is expensive to produce and also to install. in addition, such cast iron bathtubs are extremely diflicult to handle during shipment and installation because of their very great weight. cessive weight also prevents or substantially limits the use of such bathtubs in living quarters wherein weight of fixtures is a distinct disadvantage, for example, in light-weight cabins, temporary houses, certain forms of pre-fabricated dwelling, and particularly in automobile trailer houses.

The substitution of other materials for the enamelcoated cast iron bathtub has, however, provided a problem which heretofore has gone unsolved, notwithstanding the very great need for bathtubs as `units of substantially lighter weight. The enamel coating, which is employed for decorative purposes as well as for the purpose of simplifying the cleaning of the bathtub, is characterized by extreme brittleness typical of ceramic materials; and such enamel coating must be supported by an extremely strong and inflexible structure or shell in order to preduriiig ordinary wear and tear, and particularly in response to sharp impact. The use of cast iron in the formation of such a shell has, therefor, been considered a necessity heretofore.

As is disclosed and claimed in United States application entitled Light-Weight Bathtub and Production Thereof filed concurrently herewith in the names of Valentine DeOlloqui, Carl A. Strand and Carroll H. Van Hartesveldt, and owned by the assignee of the instant invention, a suitable light-weight bathtub has been found which has ra suitably flexible or resilient enamellike coating and integrally formed therewith a glass tiberpolyester laminated body of suitable strength and resiliency. Since this light-weight bathtub has the general shape of all bathtubs which .is somewhat irregular in that the bottom `tends to slope toward a drain and the extent `to which the bottom is dished or bowed varies at different points longitudinally of the bathtub structure, the problem of providing a suitably practical and economical supporting device or means for this light-weight bathtub is somewhat complicated. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the overall resiliency or flexibility of the instant bathtub is such that it is not advisable to employ supports for the bottom of the bathtub which tend to cause sharp concentration of forces at one place or another in the bottom of the tub. As will be appreciated, such means of adequately supporting the bathtub as those which might be provided by forming plaster or concrete beds in which to seat the `bathtub must involve an extensive amount of additional work that is more or less inconsistent with the essentially economical features of the instant and light-weight bathtub. Most ideally, a simple but sturdy unit or device vwhich may be prefabricated by the bathtub manufacturer and secured to the bathtub is required for the instant light-weight bathtub; and the instant invention resides in a unique and superior supporting arrangement of this type, and a unique method of producing the same.

lt is. therefore, an important obiect of the instant invention to provide an improved light-weight bathtub supporting assembly, and

an improved method of preparing or prefabricating the same.

It is a further vide an improved light-weight bathtub assembly, comprising a suitably formed glass fiber-polyester laminated bathtub shell having the generally dish-shaped bottom thereof sloped downwardly longitudinally toward a drain support device providing beam strength for said bottom consisting essentially of a rigid dinal direction, that comprises providing a flexible honeycomb core material made from strips of hardenable resin-impregnated webbing, surface of the layer to conform with the tom and urging the layer against the bottom, hardening the resin while retaining the layer thus urged against the bottom to rigidity the core and adhere the same to the bottom, and securing protective end, side wall members to the core.

dish-shaped bot- Other and further objects, features and advantages of apparent to those skilled Figure 3 is an enlarged detail view showing frag-` iiientarily the front panel and front top wall cooperation;

Figure `4 is an exploded view showing the different shapes of the laterally extending cross beams of the instant supporting device;

Figure 5 is a fragmentary enlarged plan View taken substantially along the line V-V of Figure 2;

Figure 6 is a top plan view of the supporting rack which is positioned benath the bathtub shell of Figure l;

Figure 7 isa side elevational view of a preferred embodiment of the instant light-weight bathtub assembly embodying the invention;

Figure 8 is a top plan view of the supporting rack which is positioned beneath the bathtub shell of Figure 7;

Figure 9 is a fragmentary enlarged side elevational view of the rack of Figure 8; and

Figure 10 is a top ,plan View of the bottom member for the rack of Figure 8.

As shown on the drawings:

As shown in Figures l and 2, the instant light-weight bathtub, indicated generally by the reference numeral 1.0, comprises a suitably formed glass-ber-polyester laminated bathtub shell 11 having upwardly extending front 12 and back 13 side walls, and left 14 and right 15 end walls. The back sidewall 13 extends upwardly and ares outwardly at 13a to engage and be supported by the bathroom wall W. As will be seen, the extreme top of the back wall 13 has an upwardly extending rib 13b which interlocks with suitably positioned tile T mounted on the bathroom wall W in the usual manner. The tile T and back wall W are shown essentially diagrammatically only in Figure 2 to avoid undueconfusion in the drawings.

The end walls 14 and 15'like the back wall 13 extend upwardly and outwardly to define ridges 14b and '156,' W', Wand coact therewith in substantially' the'same manner 'that the back respectively, which engage the walls object of the instant invention to pro-zA shaping the top and bottom direction of the shell 11 and arcuate The rear groove 1617 of the S-shaped strip 16 securely seats the rounded top edge of a supporting panel 17 which extends vertically upwardly from the floor F. The panel 17 is rigidly secured to the floor F, for example, by means of a screw and bracket assembly 17a, and the panel 17 extends the full longitudinal dimension of the shell 11 and upwardly to substantially the height of the arcuate top 12a of the front wall 12. The panel 17 is made of suitably strong structural wood, plywood, heavy-weight laminate or the like material, which is capable of withstanding very substantial downward pressure and which is sufficiently rigidly secured to the floor F to resist substantial laterally directed forces, so as to afford a certain amount of protection for the front wall 12. The front wall 12 is made of a suitably strong glass liber-polyester laminate material so that it is capable of withstanding very substantial downwardly directed forces, and the front wall 12 and panel 17 (by virtue of its supporting engagement with the outer lip 12b of the front wall 12) cooperate to provide very substantial force-resisting support for the top arcuate portion 12a.

In this manner, the top arcuate portion 12a is capable of readily withstanding the ordinary wear and tear during use of the instant bathtub assembly 10, and is particularly capable of withstanding the weight of human beings leaning on or pulling against the arcuate portion 12a, while getting in and out of the bathtub lll. It will be appreciated that the panel 17 may be easily installed at the same time the bathtub is installed and the panel 17 may be Prefabricated of the desired weight and strength to carry out its particular function just described. It will also be appreciated that in the use and installation of the ordinary cast iron bathtub a structure generally similar to the instant shell structure 11 is employed with a depending wall member, also made of cast iron, which takes the place of the panel 17. In such an arrangement the depending wall member furnishes the sole support substantially the entire weight of the cast iron tub, and the top edges of the other walls of the top shell are suitably affixed to the bathroom walls.

The instant top shell 11 is, however, not supported entirely by the panel 17. In fact, because of its light weight and other advantageous features connected therewith, the overall shell 11 is too resilient in character to be supported by the panel 17 alone. It is also necessary to employ a suitable rack or supporting device 1S which is centrally positioned beneath the top shell 11.

As will be seen, the rack 18 is an attached support device providing beam strength for the bottom 11a of the shell 11 and is constructed of a rigid honeycomb core layer 19 (which will be described in detail hereinafter) having its top surface 19a contoured to conform to the shell bottom 11a and secured thereto, longitudinally extending side wall members 20 and 21 and laterally extending end wall members 22 and 23 protectvelv surrounding the core layer 19 and secured to the shell bottom 11a, and a bottom wall member 24 cooperatively secured to the end and side wall members 20, 21. 22 and 23 and conforming to and secured to the bottom surface 19b of the core layer 19. As will be seen, the wall members 20, 21, 22 and 23 are elongated longitudinally and laterally extending support beams protectively surrounding the honeycomb core layer 19 and secured to the shell bottom 11a, most preferably by a suitable adhesive.

It will also be seen that the rack 18 is suitably mounted on the floor level and extends upwardly to support the central portion of the shell bottom 11a, which is itself a generally dish-shaped bottom that is sloped downwardly in the (longitudinal) direction of the drain 25, and which becomes decreasingly bowed or dished in shape in the longitudinal direction toward the drain 25 (or the drain end 14 of the shell 11).

The details of composition and construction of the shell 11 are disclosed at length in previously mentioned. co-pending application entitled Light-Weight Bathtub and Production Thereof, and these details need not be further elaborated upon herein. In general. the instant top shell 11 is a slightly resilient or flexible laminate possessing extremelv high shear resistance. having .an approximate wall thickness of about 0.08 inch and being composed essentially of polymerized polyester laminating the full longitudinal front wall top 12a.

1 desired structural arrangement.

' sity for the customer or resin having imbedded therein about one-half the weight thereof of glass fibers, with a highly pigmented coating on the inside which is rendered equally resilient by the incorporation therein of a substantial proportion of a flexible polyester.

A particularly important aspect of the instant invention resides in the structural arrangement of the rack 13, and in the fabrication thereof so as to obtain the The rack 18 is a simple and sturdy unitary device that may be prefabricated oy the manufacturer of the light-weight bathtub and permanently secured to the bottom 11 of the bathtub at its point of manufacture thereby avoiding the necesthe person installing the bathtub to handle and properly place a separate base or rack element.

Referring now to details of certain of the elements of the rack 18, it will be seen that the rack 18 constitutes an attached support device for the more or less irregularly contoured bathtub shell bottom 11, which comprises a plurality of spaced laterally extending support beams, or end walls 22 and 23, each adapted to rest upon a level surface, such as the bottom wall member 24 (or the oor surface F if the bottom 24 is not employed, or is made to t within the wall members 29, 21, 22 and 23), and extending upwardly to supportingly contact the shell bottom 11 thereabove, each of the end walls or beams 22 and 23 presenting tops 22a and 23a suitably curved to conform with the portion of the shell bottom 11 positioned thereabove. As will be seen from Figure 4, the shell bottom 11 becomes decreasingly bowed or less sharely dished in the longitudinal direction toward the drain end 14, so that the curved top 23a of the rearmost beam 23 is quite clearly bowed .and the top 22a of the forwardmost beam 22 is very slightly bowed. It will also be noted that the rearmost beam 23 extends to a noticeably greater height than the forwardmost beam 22, so that the downward slope of the shell bottom 11 in the direction of the drain 25 is also provided for by the instant beam arrangement. 1t will alsobe appreciated that a suitably compartmented rack might also be constructed using more than two of the laterally extending end walls.

As is shownin Figure 1, the side walls 20 and 21 are also shaped with top faces which conform substantially to the slope of the bottom 11a, as well as the curvature thereof at the portion contacted by the top 20a or 21a of each of the side walls 20 and 21. As shown in the instant embodiment, the bottom bases of each of the walls 2 0, 21, 22 and 23 are substantially uniplanar, and are suitably affixed to the bottom wall 24 by screws or nails (riot shown) or by a suitable adhesive. In this embodiment, the bottom member 24 is substantially flat and is adapted to rest ush upon the oor. The adjustmerits in the instant rack 18 for the variations in contour and slope of the shell bottom 11a are thus made in the wall members 2 0, 21, 22 and 23 and in the core 19 itself. The core 19 is made of a uniquely superior lightweight high beam strength material, which is suitably protected by the walls 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24, so that forces other than those directed substantially normal to the top and bottom surfaces of the core 19 will not be exerted against the core during normal use in the instant bathtub 10. The core 19 has a structure known as the honeycomb core structure, because of its resemblance to the structure of the honeycomb formed by bees involving hexagonal cells for repositories for honey and the eggs which produce their young. The instant honeycomb structure is a core layer formed of strips of hardened resin-impregnated webbing. In Figure 6, the honeycomb structure is shown essentially diagrammatically; it is shown in more detail. comprises a plurality of vertically extending strips 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 and 33 whichare alternately aixed to opposite adjacent strips. In other words, the strip 29 is alternately aflixed to and spaced from the opposite adjacent strips 28 and 30. Strip 29 is aixed to the strip 30 at 29a (whereat it is spaced from the strip 28) and it is affixed to the strip 28 at 29b (whereat it is spaced from the strip 30). This arrangement results in the formation of a laminated cellular unit, or a honeycomb structure wherein the cells are hexagonal in shape. In constructing the instant device for supporting from beneath a receptacle, such as the tub 10, made of resilient h igh shear-resistant material and having a generally dish-shaped bottom llasloping downwardly in a given but in Figure 5l As will be seen, the core 19- longitudinal direction, the first stepis that of providing a relatively thin layer of flextble honeycomb core material made from the strips 26, 27, 28, etc. which are suitably impregnated with a hardenable resin or plastic adhesive type .of material. The strips are .suitably made `of a webbing material, which -is preferably paper of relatively heavy weight and strength.

The resin `or adhesive used may be `any one of a number of suitable laminating or adhesive natural or synthetic plastic materials, which include phenol-aldehydes (phenol-formaldehyde), urea-.aldehydes (urea-formaldehyde), polyesters (unsaturated dihydric alcohol-dicarboxylic acid condensation products such as ethylene glycol maleate alkyd), modified rosins or rosin modified alkyds, etc. Most preferably, however, phenol-formaldehyde impregnated paper cores are employed.

e top surface 19a of the core 19 is shaped to conform with the dish-shaped bottom 11a. This may be done, as in the case of Figures l, 2, 4 and 6 by shaping the individual strips 26, 27, 28, etc. so that .the core member in expanded form (as shown in Figure 5) will present atop surface 19a having the dished contour of the portion of the bottom 11a which the core 19 is to contact. ln this respect, it should be pointed out that the invention oiiers particular advantages because the flexible (expanded) core 19 impregnated with unhardened resin may be urged against the shell bottom 11a so as to forcey the dish-shaped contour desired on the top .surface 19a. Most preferably, the individual strips 26, 27, 23, etc. are pre-shaped at least approximately `to conform to the contour and the necessity for excessive buckling, etc. during forcing the core surface 19a into the finally desired shape is thus avoided.

While the core 19 is urged against the shell bottom 11a (substantially conforming therewith), the resin therein is'cured, This may be done by the use of heat and/or catalysts, although the cold setting (catalyzed) phenol-formaldehyde laminating resins preferably used are permitted to set at substantially room temperatures. The core 19 may be urged against the shell bottom 11a by the use of a suitable laminating form (not shown), or by the use of the wallmembers 20, 21, 22, 23 and/or 24, which are also to be secured to the shell bottom 11a. Most preferably, the box-like frame provided by assembling the wall members 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24 is used as a laminating form, and the 4uncured resin impregnated core 19 is positioned therein and then urged against -the shell bottom 11a, while curing of the resin in the core 19 takes place. ln this manner, the resin in the core 19 is the principal integrating or adhering force here used, and its adhesive character is principally responsible for securing the entire rack 18 to the shell bottom 11a. Of course, additional strengthening elements may be used, either in the assembly of the wall members, or in their attachment to the shell bottom 11a. Most preferably, adhesives are the principal attaching means for aiiixing each and all of the elements of the rack 18 to the bottom of the shell member 11, for the reason that the shell 11 is not sufficiently thick to support most other ordinary attaching devices. stant invention that the rack member 18 is made of such suitably light material that it may be affixed securely to the shell bottom 11a without the use of means other than suitable adhesives.

vAs has been previously mentioned, the walls 20, 21,`

22 and 23 also function as supporting members for the shell bottom 11n and they are directly in contact therewith, which requires shaping the top surface of each of the end walls 22 and 23 to conform with the dished contour of different narrow laterally extending portionsl of the shell bottom 11a that are longitudinally spaced from each other, and shaping the top surface of each .of the side Walls 2t) and 21 to likewise conform with the sloping and dished contour of a pair of longitudinally,

extending side portions of the bottom 11a, laterally spaced from each other.

It will, however, be noted that the principal beam support for the instant shell bottom 11a is provided by the rigid core 19 (after setting of the resin); and the supporting function of the side and end walls 20, 21, 22 and 23 is not absolutely necessary to the proper functoining of the instant device. The protective function of the side and end walls, as well as the bottom wall 24, is comparatively more important.

lt 1s an important aspect of the in- This aspect of the` invention will be brought out more clearly in connection' with the most preferred embodiment of the instant .invention, which is shownin Figures 7, 8, .9 and 10.

Referring to Figures 7, 8, 9 and l0, it will be seen that -Figure 7 is comparable to Figure l and the various elements therein which are comparable in structure and function to those shown in Figure l are indicated by the primed reference numeral corresponding thereto. The principal difference is that the support device or rack 34 of Figure 7 is substantially different from the rack 18 of Figure l.

As will be seen from Figure 7, the device 34 is substantially coextensive with the shell bottom 11a providing beam strength for substantially the entire shell bottom 11er, and is constructed of a rigid honeycomb core layer 35 having its top surface contoured to conform to the shell bottom 11a and secured thereto, longitudinally extending side walls 36 and 37 and laterally extending end wall members 38 and 39 protectively surrounding the core 3S and. secured to the shell bottom 11n, and a bottom wall member l0 cooperatively secured to the end and side wall members 36, 37, 38 and 39 and conforming to and secured to the bottom surface of the core layer 35. it will also be noted that the core member 35 is of substantially uniform thickness or height, and is formed of strips of hardened resin-impregnated webbing `of substantially uniform height. Also, the side and end wall members 36, 37, 38 and 39 have substantially the height of the core 35, although each is shaped to conform with the' shell bottom contour at the location at which each is secured to the bottom 11a. Wedge members 41, 42, 43 and 44 are also mounted at opposite ends of the bottom wall member 40 for contacting the floor F to support the bath tub 10' thereon in suitable alignment. The wedge members 41 and 42, are suitably secured to the higher or back end of the bottom wall 40 beneath the intersections between the end wall 39 and the side walls 36 and 37, respectively; whereas the wedge members 33 and 34 are positioned at the drain end of the bottom member 40 beneath the intersections of the drain end wall 38 and the side walls 36 and 37, respectively.

in general, the preparation of the embodiment of Figure 7 involves a method of constructing a device 34 for supporting from beneath a receptacle 10 made of resilient high shear-resistant material and having a generally dish-shaped bottom 11a sloping downwardly in a given longitudinal direction, which comprises providing a frame (of the walls 36, 37, 38 and 39) substantially coextensive with the shell bottom 11a and made of flexible structural material, providing a thin layer 35 of flexible honeycomb core material of substantially the height of the frame and made from strips of hardenable resin-impregnated webbing, shaping the frame and core therewithin to conform with the contour of the shell bottom 11a by urging the frame and the core into flush contact therewith,

g shaping a deformable sheet 4) of structural material to conform with the bottom of the frame and the core opposite the side contacting the shell bottom 11a by urging the sheet 40 thereagainst, and hardening the resin to integrate the frame, core and sheet while retained against i the shell bottom 11a. Thereafter, suitable wedge members 41, 42, 43 and 44 may be applied to the rigid sheet or bottom member 4t).

Actually, the frame consists of a substantially straight laterally extending end wall 39 that is sharpely bowed or 1 curved to conform with the sharp dished contour of the shell bottom 11a in this region, a pair of substantially straight longitudinally extending side walls 36 and 37 which extend from the end wall 39 forwardly substantially the entire length of the tub 10'; and a somewhat irregularly shaped end wall 38, which has an offset por tion therein to receive the drain 25. The end wall 38 comprises substantially laterally disposed sections 3851, 38h' and 38e and angularly disposed sections 38a and 38e which connect the laterally disposed sections. As is shown in Figure 9, wherein a portion of a side wall 37 is shown, these wall members which comprise the instant frame are preferably by 1% inch lumber saw-kerfed as at 45, 46 and 47, to provide sufficient flexibility so that each wall member may be made to conform to the compound curvature of the shell bottom 11a. Preferably, the wall members are secured together by suitable means such as screws, nails, or adhesive (not shown) so as to form the entire frame just described.

Next, a iiexible paper vhoneycomb core (otC the type or material described in connection with the embodiment of Figure 1 and described in detail in connection with Figure 5) which is `preferably 1% inches in height, the same height as the` frame, is cut` to lit within the frame. The expanded core member 35, like the core member 19, preferably has a cell size c (as indicated in Figure 5) of 1/2 inch, although cell sizes may be used ranging from as little as 1A inch to as much as l inch, and preferably the core size is about 1/2 to 3A inch. The amount of impregnating resin used will depend to an appreciable extent upon the particular type of resin used, but the usual amount of laminating resin or binder should be employed, and in the particular instance, proportions ranging from about 5 to about 30% may be used, with the preferred proportion being between about l2 and about 18 weight per cent of the paper core. Phenol-formaldehyde laminating resins used in amounts of about 12-18 weight per cent have been found to be particularly effective employing theinstant cell sizes in a paper core.

A particularly important aspect concerning the superiority of the improved structure of Figure 7, involves the use of a core layer of substantially uniform height, namely, about twice the cell size, and most preferably about 1% inch height for a cell size of 1/2 inch, so as to obtain maximum effective beam strength. It will be appreciated that a core layer that is quite thick will tend to have less effective beam strength unless the cell size is extremely small, because the rather substantial height of each individual impregnated paper strip makes buckling thereof more probable, and it is necessary to position the strips more closely adjacent each other. This results in a substantial increase in weight. A particularly advantageous aspect of the embodiment of Figure 7 resides in the fact that the core layer 35 used therein is of substantially uniform height or thickness throughout so that the most effective combination of core height and cell thickness or size may be used; whereas in the embodiment of Figures l and 2, it is necessary to use core thicknesses which vary throughout the body of the core 19.

The bottom wall member 40 which is provided for the embodiment of Figure 7 is provided with a plurality of sawcuts 48, 49, 50 and 51 which extend angularly inward from the sides a substantial distance so as to provide for suitable flexibility and for the necessary complex contouring of the bottom wall member 40 in fitting the same against the bottom of the core ber 40 is preferably made of plywood, consisting of thin plies of wood or cardboard or the like having uncured hardenable adhesive therebetween, so that the bottom member 40 may be hardened or rigidiiied either previously to or at the same time as the core layer 35 is hardened by the setting of the resin therein. The core member 35, protectively surrounded by the frame formed by the walls 36, 37, 3S and 39, and the bottom wall member 40 are urged against the shell bottom 11a' so as to conform substantially therewith and the resin adhesive therein is cured or hardened so as to cause the entire rack assembly 34 to adhere to the bottom of the tub l0. Usually an addtional amount of adhesive is applied to the adhering faces of the walls 36, 37, 38 and 39 and to the adhering top surface of the core 35 so as to assure adequate adherence to the bottom of the tub 10. Also, the saw-cuts are preferably filled with a suitable ,plastic wood or the like material comprising paste-like composition of filler and phenol-formaldehyde adhesive or the like resin, so that the setting of the entire assembly will involve filling up of all of the saw-cut holes and completely sealing off the entire core assembly.

The wedge members 41, 42, 43 and 44 may, of course, be suitably applied to the bottom wall member 40 by means of nails, screws or suitable adhesive (not shown) and these wedge members 41, 42, 43 and 44 are so shaped that they effectively act as four legs for the entire bathtub assembly for suitably positioning the assembly 10 on the floor F. For maximum strength, the wedge members 41, 42, 43 and 44 are screwed to the bottom member 40 so as to be very securely fastened thereto. It will be appreciated, of course, that it would not be possible to affix wedge members to the shell bottom 11a' by such fastening means because of the thinness of the shell 11.

The various wall members 36, 37, 38 and 39, and the bottom wall member 40 are, like the wall members 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24 of the embodiment of Figure l, made of suitable structural material, which may be wood, plywood, impregnated cardboard panels, etc.

3S. The bottom wall mem-y Modications and alterations may be effected without departing from the scope of the instant invention.

I claim as my invention:

l. A light-weight bathtub assembly, comprising a suitably formed glass fiber-polyester laminated bathtub shell having a generally dish-shaped bottom therefor sloped downwardly longitudinally toward a drain end, and an attached support device providing beam strength for the bottom constructed of a rigid honeycomb core layer having its top surface contoured to conform to the shell bottom and secured thereto.

2. A light-weight bathtub assembly, comprising a suitably formed glass fiber-polyester laminated bathtub shell having a generally dish-shaped bottom therefor sloped downwardly longitudinally toward a drain end, and an attached support device providing beam strength for the bottom constructed of a rigid honeycomb core layer having its top surface contoured to conform to the shell bottom and secured thereto, said honeycomb core layer Eeing formed of strips of hardened resin-impregnated web ing.

3. A light-weight bathtub assembly, comprising a suitably formed glass fiber-polyester laminated bathtub shell having a generally dish-shaped bottom therefor sloped downwardly longitudinally toward a drain end, and an attached support device providing beam strength for the bottom constructed of a rigid honeycomb core layer having its top surface contoured to conform to the shell bottom and secured thereto, and elongated longitudinally and laterally extending support beams protectively surrounding said honeycomb core layer and secured to the shell bottom.

4. A light-weight bathtub assembly, comprising a suitably formed glass fiber-polyester laminated bathtub shell having a generally dish-shaped downwardly longitudinally toward a drain end, and an attached support device providing beam strength for the bottom constructed of a rigid honeycomb core layer having its top surface contoured to conform to the shell bottom and secured thereto, longitudinally extending side wall members and laterally extending end wall members protectively surrounding the core and secured to the shell bottom, and a bottom wall member cooperatively secured to the end and side wall members and conforming to and secured to the bottom surface of said core layer.

5. A light-weight bathtub assembly, comprising a suitably forined glass fiber-polyester laminated bathtub shell having a generally dish-shaped bottom' therefor sloped downwardly longitudinally toward a drain end, and an attached support device providing beam strength for the bottom constructed of a rigid honeycomb core layer having substantially uniform thickness and having its top surface contoured to conform to the shell bottom and secured thereto, said haneycomb core layer being formed of strips of hardened resin-impregnated webbing, longitudinally extending side wall members and laterally extending end Wall members protectively surrounding the core and secured to the shell bottom, and a bottom wall member cooperatively secured to the end and side wall members and conforming to and secured to the bottom surface of said core layer.

6. A light-weight bathtub assembly, comprising a suitably formed glass fiber-polyester laminated bathtub shell having a generally dish-shaped bottom therefor sloped downwardly longitudinally toward a drain end, and an attached support device providing beam strength for the bottom constructed of a rigid honeycomb core layer having substantially uniform thickness and having its top surface contoured to conform to the shell bottom and secured thereto, said honeycomb core layer being formed of strips of hardened resin-impregnated webbing, longitudinally extending side wall members and laterally extending end wall members protectively surrounding the core and secured to the shell bottom, and a bottom wall member cooperatively secured to the end and side wall members and conforming to and secured to the bottom surface of said core layer, and wedge members mounted at opposite ends of said bottom for contacting a oor to support the bathtub assembly thereon in suitable alignment.

7. A light-Weight bathtub assembly, comprising a suitably formed glass fiber-polyester laminated bathtub shell having a generally dish-shaped bottom therefor sloped downwardly longitudinally toward a drain end, and an attached support device providing beam strength for the bottom therefor sloped bottom constructed of a rigid honeycomb core layer having substantially uniform thickness and having its top surface contoured to conform to the shell bottom and secured thereto, said honeycomb core layer being formed of strips of hardened resin-impregnated webbing of substantially uniform height, longitudinally extending side wall members and laterally extending end wall members protectively surrounding the core and secured to the shell bottom, said side and end wall members having substantially the height of the core and being shaped to conform with the shell bottom contour at the location at which each is secured to the bottom, a bottom wall member cooperatively secured to the end and side wall members and conforming to and secured to the bottom surface of said core layer, and wedge members mounted at opposite ends of saidbottom for contacting a oor to support the bathtub assembly thereon in suitable alignment.

8. A method of constructing a device for supporting from beneath a receptable made of resilient high shearresistant material and having a generally dish-shaped bottom sloping downwardly in a given longitudinal direction,

at comprises providing a thin layer of flexible honeycomb core material made from strips of hardenable resinimpregnated webbing, shaping the top surface of the layer to conform with the dish-shaped bottom and urging the layer against the bottom, hardening the resin while retaining the layer thus urged against the bottom to rigidify the core and adhere the same to the bottom, and securing protective end, side and bottom wall members to the core.

9. A method of constructing a device for supporting from beneath a receptacle made of resilient high shearresistant material and having a generally dish-shaped bottom sloping downwardly in a given longitudinal direction, that comprises providing a thin layer of exible honeycomb core material made from strips of hardenable resinimpregnated webbing, shaping the top surface of the layer to conform with the dish-shaped bottom and urging the layer against the bottom, and hardening the resin While retaining the layer thus urged against the bottom to rigidify the core and adhere the same to the bottom.

10. A method of constructing a device for supporting from beneath a receptacle made of resilient high shearresistant material and having a genrally dish-shaped bottom sloping downwardly in a given longitudinal direction, that comprises providing a thin layer of flexible honeycomb core material of uniform thickness substantially coextensive with the bottom in size and made from strips of hardenable resin-impregnated webbing, urging the layer against the bottom to conform the same therewith, and hardening the resin while retaining the layer thus urged against the bottom to rigidify the core and adhere the same to the bottom.

ll. A method of constructing a device for supporting from beneath a receptacle made of resilient high shearresistant material and having a generally dish-shaped bottom sloping downwardly in a given longitudinal direction, that comprises providing a frame substantially coextensive with the shell bottom and made of ilexible structural material, providing a thin layer of flexible honeycomb core material resin-impregnated webbing, shaping the frame and the core therewithin to conform with the contour of the shell bottom by urging the frame and core into ush contact therewith, shaping a deformable sheet of structural material to conform with the bottom of the frame and the core opposite the side contacting the shell bottom by urging the sheet thereagainst, and hardening the resin to integrate the frame, core and sheet while retained against the shell bottom.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
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Classifications
U.S. Classification4/595, 428/116, 264/134, 52/35
International ClassificationA47K3/16
Cooperative ClassificationA47K3/1605
European ClassificationA47K3/16A