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Publication numberUS2698490 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 4, 1955
Filing dateNov 9, 1951
Priority dateNov 9, 1951
Publication numberUS 2698490 A, US 2698490A, US-A-2698490, US2698490 A, US2698490A
InventorsGoldman Markus
Original AssigneeGoldman Markus
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sandal with arch support
US 2698490 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 4, 1955 M. GOLDMAN SANDAL WITH ARCH SUPPORT Filed NOV. 9, 1951 'mmaumn FIG. 2.

INVENTOR.

{\RKUS GOLDMAN United States Patent SANDAL WITH ARCH SUPPORT Markus Goldman, Bronx, N. Y.

Application November 9, 1951, Serial No. 255,577

3 Claims. (Cl. 368.5)

This invention relates to sandals, and more particularly to sandals having an improved arch support therein.

Many people suffer with aches and pains which are directly attributable to improperly designed shoes or sandals for their feet. The use of arch supports have been resorted to in an attempt to alleviate much of the discomfort attributed to this source, however the arch supports disclosed in the prior art have lacked desirable features of support for a segment of the foot immediately above the arch. The prior art has heretofore further been unable to provide a sandal for warm weather wear having adequate arch support for people requiring the same.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved sandal having improved arch support means.

It is a further object of the invention to provide an improved sandal having improved arch support means whighl do not detract from the aesthetic features of the san a It is another object of the invention to provide a sandal including improved arch support means wherein the arch support may be formed to the shape required by a person desiring to wear the sandals.

It is a further object of the invention to provide an improved sandal including arch support means which is simple and economical to manufacture.

It is another object of the invention to disclose a novel and improved arch support structure which is economical to manufacture and may be shaped to fit a particular arch if so desired.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will be obvious to those skilled in the art from a reading of the specification in combination with the drawing, wherein:

Figure 1 is a plan view of the sandal embodying the invention.

Figure 2 is a plan view of an insole of the sandal embodying the invention showing a pocket having my improved arch support member therein.

Figure 3 is a sectional view, looking toward the toe of the sandal as taken along line 3-3 of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a view of an insole of a sandal including an alternate pocket having my improved arch therein.

Figure 5 is a sectional View looking toward the toe of the insole as taken along line 55 of Figure 4.

Referring now to the drawing wherein like numerals denote corresponding parts throughout the several views, the numeral of Figure 1 represents a sandal including an outsole 12, a midsole 14 and an insole 16. A suitable heel 18 is afiixed to the sandal by any suitable means currently known in the art. A vamp 20, formed with a plurality of strap segments 20a is aifixed to the sole of the sandal in any known manner as for example in accordance with my invention as set forth in United States Patent No. 2,554,823 issued May 1, 1951. A quarter portion 22 may likewise be advantageously secured to the sole of the sandal as taught by my Patent No. 2,554,823. An arch support 28, provided with a color coating analogous to the exterior color of the vamp and quarter portion is mounted within the sandal as hereinafter more fully described.

Referring to Figure 2, insole 16 is provided with a plurality of apertures 24 adjacent the periphery of the insole, which apertures are adapted to have passed therethrough the straps 20a of vamp 20 and similar strap lice endings of quarter portion 22. Insole 16 provides, with a pocket side member 26 secured to insole 16, an arch support retaining pocket of which one side member is a segment of insole 16, thus utilizing a segment of the insole 16 as one pocket side member, member 26 as a second pocket side member, and the adjacent strap members of vamp 20 as a third pocket side member. Side member 26 may be secured to insole 16 by forming a slot of arcuate shape along a line corresponding substantially to the innermost proper contact limits of the arch of a foot as illustrated at X and having a portion of pocket side member 26, as 26a, inserted through said slot to the underside of and adjacent said insole 16 in which relationship it may be glued to form one side of he pocket described. Between the main body of pocket ide member 26 and its extension 26a are notches 26c hich aid in properly positioning said member 26.

An alternate method for forming the pocket is illustrated in Figures 4 and 5 wherein the pocket side member 26b is secured to insole 16a by sewing the pocket side member 26b and insole 16a together as at Y, thus forming, between pocket side member 26b and insole 16a, a pocket for arch support 28.

Arch support 28 is formed of a body portion A of hard rubber, moldable hard plastic or may be formed of wood. The body portion A isformed with a concave-convex upper surface adapted to fit under a foot at the arch of the foot substantially as shown in Figure 3, and with an outer margin 34 tapered and extending upward a distance above the outer limits of the arch of the foot as at point 36. A dotted line 40 has been inserted to indicate the limit of previous arch supports under a foot 32. Support 28 is shown as provided with a covering layer 38. It may readily be seen that with the arch support constructed as heretofore practiced, the outermost edges of a foot such as 32 would droop over the edge of the arch support and lead to discomfiture and callouses.

By providing the pocket for my arch support, I assure that the arch support may be retained in the desired position. It is further possible to remove the arch support if desired and insert arch supports of varying sizes within the pocket until one of suitable size is found for a prospective purchaser of the sandal or shoe. The material for forming the arch support may be chosen for its ability to be shaped and hardened so that it may be formed to fit a particular foot as desired, and then hardened to retain the desired shape.

In actual practice, the desired arch support is placed in the sandal, and more particularly between the pocket side member 26 and its counterpart formed by insole 16, and is retained within the pocket formed thereby by said side members and by the tightening of the vamp straps.

Having thus described my invention, I desire it understood that variations thereof will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, and I therefore desire that the claims made herein be interpreted within the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A sandal including a vamp, an insole and a pocket side member, said pocket side member being secured to said insole along a line corresponding substantially to the entire normal inner longitudinal arch line of the sandal, said pocket side member and a portion of said insole together forming two sides of an open pocket, and a portion of said vamp extending into said pocket and being secured only to the sole structure of the sandal.

2. A sandal including a vamp, an insole and a pocket side member, said pocket side member being sewn to said insole along a line corresponding substantially to the entire normal inner longitudinal arch line of the sandal, said pocket side member and a portion of said insole together forming two sides of an open pocket, and a portion of said vamp extending into said pocket and being secured only to the sole structure of the sandal.

3. A sandal including a vamp, an insole and a pocket side member, said insole having a slit extending along the line corresponding substantially to the entire normal inner longitudinal arch line of the sandal, and said pocket said pocket side member and a portion of said insole forming two sides of an open pocket, and a portion of References Cited in the file of this patent said vamp extending into said open pocketand being 5 2,167,035

secured only to the sole structure of said sandal.

UNITED STATES PATENTS Saladino July 30, 1935 Westheimer July 25, 1939 Geffner June 18, 1940 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Nov. 12, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2009789 *Feb 12, 1934Jul 30, 1935Charles SaladinoCushion arch support
US2167035 *Oct 22, 1938Jul 25, 1939Westheimer Max AlbertRubber sole for sandals
US2205091 *May 6, 1939Jun 18, 1940Samuel H GeffnerFoot covering
GB612431A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2788591 *Apr 22, 1954Apr 16, 1957Walter Robert MantellSandal
US5319866 *Aug 21, 1991Jun 14, 1994Reebok International Ltd.Composite arch member
US6237251Oct 1, 1999May 29, 2001Reebok International Ltd.Athletic shoe construction
US6694641 *Aug 7, 2002Feb 24, 2004Yoram GillFast-strapping sandal
US6725578 *Apr 3, 2001Apr 27, 2004D. Casey KerriganJoint protective shoe construction
US6785985Jul 2, 2002Sep 7, 2004Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US6948262May 5, 2003Sep 27, 2005Kerrigan D CaseyCantilevered shoe construction
US6988329Mar 4, 2005Jan 24, 2006Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7047670Jul 2, 2003May 23, 2006Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7152625May 24, 2004Dec 26, 2006Reebok International Ltd.Combination check valve and release valve
US7278445Jul 12, 2004Oct 9, 2007Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7337560Oct 28, 2005Mar 4, 2008Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7340851Mar 29, 2006Mar 11, 2008Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7418790Sep 26, 2005Sep 2, 2008Kerrigan D CaseyCantilevered shoe construction
US7513067Jan 12, 2006Apr 7, 2009Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7721465Jan 4, 2008May 25, 2010Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7735241Jan 11, 2006Jun 15, 2010Reebok International, Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US8037623Oct 18, 2011Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a fluid system
US8151489Apr 9, 2010Apr 10, 2012Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US8677652Mar 9, 2012Mar 25, 2014Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US20040211084 *May 24, 2004Oct 28, 2004William MarvinShoe having an inflatable bladder
US20050028404 *Jul 12, 2004Feb 10, 2005William MarvinShoe having an inflatable bladder
US20050144810 *Mar 4, 2005Jul 7, 2005William MarvinShoe having an inflatable bladder
US20060048412 *Sep 26, 2005Mar 9, 2006Kerrigan D CCantilevered shoe construction
US20060048415 *Oct 28, 2005Mar 9, 2006William MarvinShoe having an inflatable bladder
US20060112593 *Jan 11, 2006Jun 1, 2006William MarvinShoe having an inflatable bladder
US20060162186 *Mar 29, 2006Jul 27, 2006William MarvinShoe having an inflatable bladder
US20070046804 *Aug 28, 2006Mar 1, 2007Olympus CorporationImage capturing apparatus and image display apparatus
US20080052963 *Aug 29, 2006Mar 6, 2008Pang-Ching ChiangOrthotic foot wear
US20080098620 *Jan 4, 2008May 1, 2008William MarvinShoe Having an Inflatable Bladder
US20100192410 *Apr 9, 2010Aug 5, 2010Reebok International, Ltd.Shoe Having an Inflatable Bladder
US20130340281 *Jun 24, 2013Dec 26, 2013Laina Michelle GossmanFlexible midfoot orthotic shoe insert
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/172, 36/11.5
International ClassificationA43B7/14, A43B3/12
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/14, A43B7/142, A43B3/128
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20A, A43B3/12S, A43B7/14