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Publication numberUS2698670 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 4, 1955
Filing dateApr 11, 1950
Priority dateApr 11, 1950
Publication numberUS 2698670 A, US 2698670A, US-A-2698670, US2698670 A, US2698670A
InventorsJoseph B Sebok
Original AssigneeHoudaille Hershey Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air cleaner
US 2698670 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. B. SEBOK Jan. 4; 1955 AIR CLEANER Filed April 11, 1950 3 She'ets-Sheet 1 fiYVE'JYL UP JosegokJBSebOf J. a. sE oK I AIR CLEANER Jam, 4, 1955 Filed A pril 11. 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 1321751710? Joseplzfifiabolt fiLLys Jan. 4, 1955 1 SEBQK 2,698,670

AIR CLEANER Filed April 11, .1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 fig. 5

a fJYZ/EHLUF 15 J0 e [25.520014 18 M .255 EL 55 United States Patent AIR CLEANER Joseph B. Sebok, Detroit, Mich, asslgnor to Houdallle firshey Corporation, Detroit, Mich, a corporation of Application April 11, 1950, Serlnl No. 155,164

6 Chill. (Cl. 183-15) This invention relates to improvements in an air cleaner, and more particularly to an air cleaner highly desirable for association with the carburetor of an internal combustion engine of the automotive type, although the invention will have other uses and purposes as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

The later designs of automotive vehicles, and those yet to come, indicate a definite trend toward asteady decrease of the space between a carburetor and the hood of the automobile. Considerable ditficulty has been experienced in the past in properly locating the air cleaner in the limited space provided beneath the hood of an automobile. In some cases, the space between the automobile hood and the top of the commonly known carburetor housing has or will be decreased to approximately one inch or even less. There is accordingly no room for the customary carburetor housing together with its air intake horn, and the necessary clamping means to connect the outlet conduit of an air cleaner to that born, as heretofore used.

Accordingly, it has been proposed to eliminate the customary cast carburetor housing in its entirety, together with the horn, and the clamping means, and construct the air cleaner so that it furnishes the necessary housing for the carburetor. Frequently, while there is little or no space above the carburetor and beneath the hood of an automobile, there is space laterally of the carburetor sufficient to accommodate an air cleaner even of relatively large diameter.

It is therefore an important object of this invention to provide an air cleaner designed to effectively house the carburetor.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an air cleaner of the so-called hat type, and wherein the center tube clean air outlet conduit of the cleaner forms the housing for a carburetor.

A further object of the invention resides in the provision of a liquid bath air cleaner embodying separable casing sections, the air cleaner also functioning as a housing for a carburetor, and the structure being such that a single bolt holds the separable sections of the cleaner together and also securely mounts the entire cleaner unit on the carburetor.

Still a further feature of the instant invention resides in the provision of an air cleaner of the so-called hat type, constructed to function as a housing for a carburetor, and which when connected with the carburetor provides an extremely low clearance over the top of the highest portion of the carburetor mechanism, and extends above the carburetor only a scant fraction of an inch higher than the previously used carburetor housing, which the instant invention eliminates.

It is also a feature of this invention to provide a liquid bath air cleaner embodying an improved form of deflector disposed immediately adjacent the liquid sump of the cleaner. The deflector forming a part of this invention is an improvement on that set forth, described and claimed in William H. Zelinski U. S. Letters Patent No. 2,492,083, issued December 20, 1949, and entitled Air Cleaner and Deflector Therefor.

A further object of the invention resides in the provision of a liquid bath air cleaner of the so-called hat type which is more efficient than cleaners of the same character heretofore known.

Where an air cleaner, especially one of the hat type, is designed so that the center outlet conduit means are sufiiciently large to effectively house a carburetor, many of the parts of the cleaner have to be made of considerably greater diameter than would be the case if a smaller sized outlet conduit means were used. Such increase in size of parts, especially parts heretofore made by initially providing a cup-like drawing, then removing the bottom portion thereof, results in a considerable and objectionably expensive waste of material. Heretofore, also, many separate operations were performed to provide the component parts of an air cleaner, and those operations not only involved time, labor, but expensive complements of essential tools.

With that thought in mind, it is another object of the instant invention to provide an economical method of making parts of an air cleaner, the method being designed to avoid waste to a very material extent, and effect a considerable saving on essential tools by eliminating the need of a number of them, as well as further reducing the manufacturing costs by reducing the labor and time neccsary to produce the component parts.

Also an object of the invention resides in the provision of an air cleaner in which the cover and outer filter shell embody one integral piece.

While some of the more salient features, characteristics and advantages of the instant invention have been above pointed out, others will become apparent from the following disclosures, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which Figure l is a fragmentary part elevational, part central vertical sectional view of an air cleaner embodying principles of the instant invention, showing the same operatively associated with a carburetor;

Figure 2 is a bottom plan view of the air cleaner of Fig. 1, showing the same removed from the carburetor;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view illustrating a step in the manufacture of certain component parts of the cleaner;

Figure 4 is also a fragmentary central vertical sectional view illustrating a step in the process of forming certain other component parts of the cleaner;

Figure 5 is a fragmentary central vertical sectional view illustrating a step in the formation of the unitary cover and outer filter holding shell;

Figure 6 is a view similar in character to Fig. 5, showing the same structure in an advanced stage of formation, indicating by dotted lines the completion of the formation of this part; and

Figure 7 is a fragmentary central vertical sectional view corresponding to the lower right hand portion of Fig. l, but showing a somewhat different form of deflector.

As shown on the drawings:

With reference to Fig. 1, it will be seen that the illustrated embodiment of the instant invention is shown associated with a carburetor rather diagrammatically illustrated and which will be rather briefly described herein. The particular carburetor selected for illustrative purposes is of the downdraft type, and one designed to supply a V-8 engine, such a carburetor including dual mixing chambers for delivering a combustible fuel mixture to opposite sides of the engine. The use of the present invention is not limited, however, to a carburetor of the illustrated type, but the invention may equally as well be employed with a downdraft carburetor having only a single mixing chamber and single controls therefor, and to carburetors of various other types as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

The illustrated carburetor includes a base portion 1 which may be connected to an internal combustion engine in a known manner. This base portion contains mixing ice chambers 2 and 3 from which the combustible mixture is discharged to opposite sides of the engine, the outflow of the combustible mixture being controlled by the customary throttle valves, not illustrated in the drawings. The inlet ports to the mixing chambers are controlled by choke valves 4 and 5 both of which are secured to a common shaft 6 for simultaneous actuation either manually or automatically as may be desired. The illustrated carburetor includes a platform-like structure immediately above the ports controlled by the choke valves which extends outwardly to form a circumferential supporting flange 7 which is annularly recessed in its upper margin to provide a seat for a gasket 8.

Above the platform, the carburetor embodies a casing 9 housing the usual float chamber from which liquid fuel is discharged into the choke valve control ports by means of outlet pipes 10 and 11. Ad acent the casing 9 is another casing 12 which contains the usual accelerating p bftending upwardly from the top of the casing 9, is a single attaching bolt 13, the upper end of which is threaded to accommodate a wing nut or the equivalent 14 and, as will more fully later appear herein, this single bolt and nut arrangement not only holds the separable sections of the air cleaner together, but maintains the entire air cleaner unit operatlvely connected with the carburetor.

The air cleaner itself is preferably fabricated from sheet metal, and it will be understood that all parts not intended to be separable one from the other for purposes of servicing the cleaner are spot welded, brazed, or equivalently secured together at points of contact.

The air cleaner embodies a casing comprising separable sections, and in the illustrated instance, the upper casing section carries the filter mass and deflector, while the lower casing section is shaped to define a sump for cleansing liquid.

The lower casing section includes a tubular outlet conduit or shell 15. The lower end of this tubular element-is spun or otherwise formed outwardly and downwardly to provide an angular flange 16, the lateral portion of which seats against the aforesaid gasket 8 carried by the carburetor supporting flange 7. it is not necessary that the flange upon the air cleaner part 15 establish an intimate fit with the carburetor supporting flange, because of the aforesaid engagement with the gasket which eflects an air tight seal. Secured to the upper end of the conduit or shell 15 is a single piece die drawn member which forms the remainder of the lower casing section. This member is shaped to define a liquid sump of the same general contour as disclosed in the aforesaid Zelinski patent. Near the point of securement to the conduit 15 the casing member is formed horizontally to provide a seat for a gasket 17 which effects an air tight seal between the separable sections of the air cleaner. From this gasket seat the casing curves downwardly to form a bottom portion, and then extends upwardly in a substantially vertical wall 18 which rises to a distance not exceeding the depth of the sump. The vertical wall 18 merges with another downwardly sloping wall 19 and then rises to form an outer cylindrical upstanding portion 20. This shaping provides a liquid sump divided into two concentric annular portions Hand 22, and the initial or static liquid level is marked by a slight indentation in the wallat 23.

The upper casing section embodies a cover 24, somewhat dome-like in shape, having a centrally recessed portion with a flat bottom 25, and except for an aperture through this portion 25 to accommodate the aforesaid bolt 13, the cover is imperforate. The part 25. of course, forms a suitable seat for engagement by the wing nut 14. Adjacent its point of maximum diameter, the cover is provided with a reverse bend to form a hood-like flange 26 projecting laterally, and depending from this flange 26 is an outer filter holding shell 27. The shell 27 is of less diameter than the upstanding wall on the lower casing section so as to provide an annular air inlet passage 28 therebetween, which leads downwardly toward the outer portion 22 of the liquid sump.

An inner tubular conduit or shell 29 is also provided and this shell is secured to the cover 24 by way of a supporting spider 30 attached to the upper portion of the shell 29. This spider 30 has a formation complemental to the center portion of the cover, and is secured to the cover. The spider is also provided with numerous relatively large apertures 31 through which cleaned air may enter the conduit or shell 29 which functions both as an outlet conduit for the cleaner and as a filter holding shell. This shell 29. is turned outwardly at the bottom as indicated at 32 to seat against the aforesaid gasket 17.

Between the inner and outer shell is a filter mass 33, preferably of the bonded typ that is a suitable fibrous material such as vegetable fiber, animal hair, or other stranded material is preferably bonded together by a thermoplastic, which may also bond the filter unit to the inside of the shells 29 and 27.

Also carried by the conduit or shell 29, beneath the filter mass 33, is a deflector fabricated from two separate pieces. The inner piece or supporting part 34 is snaped in a trough-like formation and provided with a plurality of relatively large elongated apertures 35 in the bottom thereof. The other piece embodies a vertical wall 36 having a trough-like formation 37 on its outer lower portion, the outer wall of this trough-like formation 37 being spaced from the aforesaid upstanding wall 18 of the liquid sump to provide an aspiration opening 38 therebetween through which liquid may be aspirated or educed from the sump by traveling air. An annular series of relatively small apertures 39 are provided through the upstanding wall 36 leading into the trough 37, and these apertures are preferably below the static liquid level of the sump. Twenty-four of such apertures are a satisfactory number, although more or less may be utilized with good results. The entire deflector is spaced above the bottom of the liquid sump, and it will be noted from the showing in Fig. 1, that the filter mass extends downwardly on both sides of the upright wall 36 of the deflector which preisrably forms an indentation in the mass as indicated at From the foregoing, it will be noted that when the wing nut 14 is removed from the bolt 13, the entire air cleaner unit may be lifted bodily off the carburetor if grasped at the bottom. The unit may be removed a section at a time, if so desired, and when separated the upper casing section includes the cover, the two filter holding shells and the deflector, leaving the lower casing section open for the removal of cleaning fluid and dirt, and the replacement of new cleaning fluid, such as oil.

it will also be noted that when mounted over the carburetor in the position seen in Fig. l, the air cleaner occupies extremely little space above the carburetor. The inner conduits or shells 29 and 15 are substantially in alignment, and conjointly function as a housing for the carburetor, taking the place of the former cast housing customarily used on a carburetor, and that cast housing would occupy some of the space now occupied by the cleaner above the accelerating pump 12 so that the cleaner actually may be mounted over a carburetor, and not project more than a fraction of an inch above the former height of the carburetor.

In operation, owing to suction created by the engine, air is drawn downwardly through the inlet passage 28, contacts and substantially immediately carries up the oil in the sump portion 22, this oil saturating the lower portion of the filter mass 33. The air passes upwardly over the upper edge of the wall 36 of the deflector, through the filter mass, through the openings 31 in the spider 30, and descends substantially vertically inside the conduits 29 and 15 to enter the carburetor. Cleaning liquid and heavier dirt circulates in the lower inside region of the filter mass out of the direct air path, and descends through the openings 35 in the deflector back to the sump. Sump oil may be aspirated into the air stream through the space 38, and some may pass through the openings 39. Thus, the outside of the wall 36 is kept completely saturated or covered with oil at all times during operation.

The above described air cleaner is exceedingly economical to manufacture by virtue of my construction of various parts of the cleaner. Referring to Fig. 3, for example, it will be seen that a single somewhat cupshaped drawing or stamping, generally indicated by numeral 41, may be made having the illustrated formation. This single stamping may be severed along the line 42, to thereby cut off the aforesaid spider 30, the openings 31 if not already provided in the first operation may then be readily punched through. A second annular severance may be made as indicated by the short line 43 through that single wall only thereby providing both the parts from which the deflector is fabricated. The outer wall portion 44 of the inner trough 34 is reduced in diameter slightly, for example by die shrinking, so that it may be disposed inside the vertical portion 36, when the latter is inverted. It will thereupon be seen that in a single stamping and two simple cutting operations, three cleaner portions have been provided and there has been no wastage of material except for the provision of openings, such wastage not being avoidable.

In Fig. 4 I have illustrated an economical construction for providing both outlet conduits or shells 15 and 29 in a single drawing and cutting operation. In this instance, a single stamping or drawing generally indicated by numeral 45 is made, which is severed along the line 46. The upper portion provides the conduit or shell 29, and the inwardly turned part adjacent the line of severance is than outwardly turned as indicated by the dotted lines to provide the gasket contacting flange 32 on this piece. Likewise, an inwardly turned rtion 47 on the lower piece, which forms the con uit 15 is straightened, and spun into the angular flange 16 which contacts the gasket on the supporting flange of the carburetor.

In Figs. and 6 I have illustrated a highly economical construction for the cover and outer filter holding shell. Heretofore, the filter holding shell was drawn alone into cup shape with large openings punched in the bottom, and this resulted in much waste, which waste is greatly exaggerated when the cleaner is made of a size to house a carburetor. It is much more economical to make one cup-shaped drawing or stamping 48 as seen in Fig. 5, and then this stamping is spun to provide an outwardly extending bead 49 adjacent the junction between the top and skirt portion of the stamping. Thereafter, this bead 49 is merely squeezed together, as indicated by dotted.

lines, to provide the aforesaid hood-like flange 26 which acts as a shield or hood over the annular air inlet 28, and the cover 24 and outer filter holding shell 27 are naturally integral with each other. Such a construction of these parts results in a tremendous saving of material, as well as the cost of tools, time and labor over the construction heretofore employed.

In Fig. 7 I have illustrated a slightly different form of deflector and filter holding shell construction. In this instance, the outer filter holding shell 27a is provided with a bottom 50 having an inwardly and upwardly sloping outer portion provided with relatively large openings 51. The inner portion 52 of the bottom is substantially laterally disposed and preferably imperforate, this portion of the bottom cooperating with a piece attached at the outer edge thereof and comprising depending wall 53 with a trough-like formation 54 on the outside thereof at the lower end of the wall, to form a deflector assembly. In the bottom of the trough-like formation 54 an annular series of openings 55 is provided, and the outer wall of this trough-like formation is spaced from the adjacent upstanding wall 18 of the sump to provide an aspiration space 56.

In operation, the air traveling through the cleaner will aspirate sump liquid both through the openings 55 and the space 56. The vertical wall 53 is continuously wetted with oil and provides an excellent surface against which the dirt may impinge. At the same time, there will be a good head of circulating oil in the filter mass above the imperforate bottom 52, which circulatory path will be adjacent the direct air path and result in excellent cleaning of the air. The heavier particles of dirt will be removed by contact with the fluid covered wall 53, and the finer particles removed in the filter mass. There will be rapid drainage of cleansing liquid and dirt from the filter mass whenever the automobile engine slows down or is stopped.

Dirt, of course, may drain from the trough 54 through the openings 55 back into the lower part of the sump.

An added advantage may be obtained with the use of a downwardly sloping annular guide element 57 disposed in the incoming air passage 28, the guide element being anchored upon the filter holding shell 27a. Such a guide element increases the velocity of the air in the neighboring region by virtue of narrowing the passage, and guides the air against the wall 20 of the lower casing, so that the air will follow a smooth path around the portion 22 of the sump, thereby lessening restriction.

Tests have proven that air cleaners constructed as described hereinabove, with such deflector arrangements, are actually more efficient than any hat type air cleaner appearing on the market. The instant invention, under test, gave an efficiency of 97.3% average, using a variable air flow from 180 cubic feet per minute to 20 cubic feet per minute, with fine dust; and an efficiency of 98.5% under the same circumstances with coarse dust. Standard fine air cleaner test dust has the following specifications:

Per cent 39 Particle Size Per cent 0-5 microns 12 5-10 microns 12' 10-20 microns 14 20-40 microns 23 40-80 microns 30 80-200 microns 9 The percentages are permited a variation of 2-3% plus or minus.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. In an air cleaner, a casing having an inlet and an outlet and a liquid sump adjacent the path of air traveling from the inlet to the outlet, filter means above said sump, a deflector below said filter means, said deflector including a lateral wall adjacent said filter mass, a vertical wall depending from said lateral wall and a trough-like formation on the lower part of said vertical wall on the side thereof opposite said lateral wall.

2. In an air cleaner, a casing having an inlet and an outlet and a liquid sump adjacent the path of air traveling from the inlet to the outlet, filter means above said sump, a deflector below said filter means, said deflector includmg a lateral wall adjacent said filter mass, a vertical wall depending from said lateral wall, a trough-like formation on the lower part of said vertical wall on the side thereof opposite said lateral wall, said lateral wall being imperforate, said trough-like formation having openings therein, and said trough-like formation being on the air inlet side of said upright wall.

a 3. In combination, a carburetor having a platform at an intermediate location and superstructure thereabove, said carburetor having a port controlled by a choke valve adjacent the plane of said platform, and an air cleaner including a casing comprising separable upper and lower sectronsand having an inlet opening for dirty air, each of sa1d casing sections having an outlet conduit, air cleaning means between the inlet and said outlet conduits, and said outlet conduits conjointly forming a housing for the superstructure of the carburetor, the lower of said conduits being shaped for sealing engagement with said platform.

4. In an air cleaner for attachment to a carburetor and to form a housing for the carburetor, a one-piece cover and first outer wall member, a one-piece sump and second outer wall member laterally spaced from said first outer wall member, a first inner wall to mount on the carburetor, a second inner wall member carried by said cover for registration with said first inner wall, a filter mass carried by said cover and first outer wall member, and a deflector carried by said second inner wall above the bottom of said sump, said first and second inner walls cooperating to form a housing for the carburetor, and said first and second outer walls cooperating to form an air inlet to the sump.

5. In an air cleaner for attachment to a carburetor and to form a housing for the carburetor, a one-piece cover and first outer wall member, a one-piece sump and second outer wall member laterally spaced from said first outer wall member, a flange on said cover and first outer wall member overhanging the space between said first outer wall and said second outer wall, a first inner wall to mount on the carburetor, a second inner wall member carried by said cover member for registration with said first inner wall, a filter mass carried by said cover and first outer wall member, and a deflector carried by said second inner wall above the bottom of said sump, said first and second inner walls cooperating to form a housing for the carburetor, and said first and second outer walls cooperating to form an air inlet to the sump.

6. In an air cleaner for attachment to a carburetor and to form a housing for the carburetor, a one-piece cover and first outer wall member, a one-piece sump and second outer wall member laterally spaced from said first outer wall member, a first inner wall to mount on the carburetor, a second inner wall member carried by said cover for registration with said first inner wall, a filter mass carried by said cover and first outer wall member, and a deflector carried by said second inner wall above the bottom of said sump, said deflector having a trough- 9 '5 like formation thereon cooperating with said sump to form an aspirator, said first and second inner walls coo rating to form a housing for the carburetor, and said rst and second outer walls cooperating to form an air inlet to the sump.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,141,570 vMcCornaclt June 1, 1915 1,945,180 Carter Jan. 30, 1934 1,973,362 Weiertz et al. Sept. 11, 1934 8 Cuno Feb. 25. 1936 Evans Aug. 8, 1939 Hubbard June 8, 1943 Beatty et al Aug. 20, 1946 Zelinski Dec. 20, 1949 Lechtenberg June 6, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS France Mar. 30, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1141570 *Aug 15, 1910Jun 1, 1915Herbert MccornackCarbureter.
US1945180 *Oct 30, 1931Jan 30, 1934William C CarterCarburetor
US1973362 *May 4, 1933Sep 11, 1934Weiertz Axel HugoCarburetor
US2031936 *Feb 10, 1934Feb 25, 1936Cuno Eng CorpArt of forming filters
US2168670 *Mar 2, 1936Aug 8, 1939King Seeley CorpAir cleaner
US2321085 *Nov 6, 1941Jun 8, 1943Electromaster IncMethod for producing drawn cups with faced and beveled edges
US2406188 *Mar 25, 1943Aug 20, 1946United Specialties CoMounting for cleaner elements
US2492083 *Aug 21, 1946Dec 20, 1949Houdaille Hershey CorpAir cleaner and deflector therefor
US2510825 *Dec 18, 1947Jun 6, 1950Briggs & Stratton CorpAir cleaner
FR880587A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2763251 *Nov 22, 1954Sep 18, 1956Gen Motors CorpInduction means
US3143580 *Mar 6, 1961Aug 4, 1964Holley Carburetor CoCarburetor
US6235073 *Nov 10, 1999May 22, 2001Nelson Industries, Inc.Fastener retention system
Classifications
U.S. Classification96/278, 55/DIG.280, 261/76, 55/385.3, 29/416, 96/338
International ClassificationF02M35/026
Cooperative ClassificationY10S55/28, F02M35/026
European ClassificationF02M35/026