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Publication numberUS2699149 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 11, 1955
Filing dateJul 22, 1953
Priority dateJul 22, 1953
Publication numberUS 2699149 A, US 2699149A, US-A-2699149, US2699149 A, US2699149A
InventorsFrederick P Hammell
Original AssigneeFrederick P Hammell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lettering penrack
US 2699149 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 11, 1955 F. P. HAMMELL LETTERING PENRACK 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed July 22, 1955 INVENTOR l 11h 'mmv/11,.

ATTORNEY Jan. 11, 1955 l P, HAMMELL 2,699,149

LETTERING PENRACK Filed July 22, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR United States Patent O LETTERING PENRACK Frederick P. Hammell, Frederick, Md.

Application July 22, 1953, Serial No. 369,586

12 Claims. (Cl. 1Z0-108) This invention relates to a lettering pen-rack having ink draining means for the pens as well as a solvent applying means cooperating therewith.

Pens of the character stated are shown and described in the patent to Gourguin No. 1,528,142 of March 3, 1925, and usually embody a stepped tubular body, the larger end providing an ink reservoir or chamber open at its upper end and the opposite much smaller end providing a tubular stylus communicating with the reservoir through a valve seat in the inner end wall of the reservoir. An ink flow regulating and stylus cleaning pin and/or stem member is freely slidably mounted in the reservoir and tubular stylus, and as shown in the patent referred to is equipped with a centrally enlarged valve forming portion which normally rests upon the seat in the reservoir wall, with the pin extending entirely through and beyond the free end of the nozzle-like stylus. In use, however, the tail pin will be depressed within the open free end of the stylus raising the valve from the frustoconical seat in the reservoir and permitting ink to ilow by gravity into and through the tubular stylus. Unless such pens are in constant use, which is not usually the case, ink will quickly dry within the narrow passage through the stylus, clogging the same and/or interfering with the required ilow of ink from the reservoir.

It is a primary object of this invention, therefore, to provide a novel rack for the support of a plurality of pens of the above noted character, when not in use and wherein provision is made for both retaining the tail pins in the depressed position last referred to and for absorbing all ink as it is drained through the pens.

A further object of the invention is to provide a solvent bath compartment for cooperation with the pen rack and pin depressing means with capacity for introduction of the rack thereinto while maintaining the bath at a level to cover and ll the stylus portions of the pens and thereby dissolve any ink accumulated thereon and within the openings of said pens and valves.

A further object of the invention is to provide a rack holder for a plurality of pens of the character above referred to whereby the pens are retained in readily identified positions and are thereby restrained against otherwise rolling about the usual inclined drawing table with resulting confusion in locating and identifying any particular pen desired to be used.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent in the course of the following detailed description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is an isometric view showing the improved pen rack and holder positioned within the solvent chamber of a transparent housing device for cooperation therewith, the device also providing a s olvent containing well for different firms of writing pens to be directly supported therein;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view as observed in the plane of line 2-2 on Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional view as observed in the plane of line 3 3 on Fig. l;

Fig. 4 is an isometric view of the improved pen rack and holder;

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view as observed in the plane of line 5-5 on Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a transverse sectional view as observed in the plane of line 6-6 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged vertical sectional view showing a constructional form of lettering pen and the associated 2,699,149 Patented Jan. 11, 1955 ICC parts of the improved rack in supporting and draining the p In the detailed description of the invention, reference will rst be made to Fig. 7, in order that the purpose' of the invention will be more clearly understood.

A pen P is here illustrated which is representative of the structural character of the pens for which the rack is adapted. It will be seen, therefore, that the pen P comprises a pen body proper p and which includes an ink reservoir or chamber r provided by an outer cylindrical wall portion c, a reduced cylindrical wall portion c and a further reduced cylindrical wall portion c. This latter tubular portion provides the pen stylus or point.

A plunger p is disposed within this pen body proper and is freely axially movable therein, The plunger comprises a stem s having a head h at its upper free end, a tail pin t at its lower end and an intermediate valve portion. The valve portion v is formed at the lower end of a cylindrical portion l which is slidably mounted within the cylindrical body portion c and which is provided witih one or more vertical grooves g. The lower end of this cylindrical portion l is of frusto-conical form to provide the valve member v for engagement with a frusto-conical seat f at the junction of the cylindrical body portion c' and c. As shown the tail pin t projects downwardly from the valve end of the cylindrical portion l and is disposed within the tubular stylus portion c of the stepped pen body. The tail pin t as illustrated in Fig. 7 is in the depressed position it assumes when the pen is in use for drawing or lettering. If the pen P is lifted from engagement with the surface 28 and retained in such elevated position the plunger will drop under gravity and thereby check the flow of ink from the reservoir r. If this pen contains a supply of ink and is left in a normal supported position out of contact with the work, the ink therein will soon dry and/ or thicken so as to clog the pen. Even if the supply of ink is exhausted from the pen when it is set aside the relatively moving parts as well as the tubular walls will be coated to a degree which after drying may effect clogging on the further use thereof, if such coating is not dissolved or otherwise removed from the pen parts.

With this structure and operation of pen in mind, the improved rack and holder therefore comprises a member 23, preferably formed of plastic material and which includes a horizontal rectangular top plate 24. This top plate is provided with a plurality of vertical axis apertures 25, each adapted to closely receive the stepped cylindrical body portion c' of the pen with the shoulder provided at the juncture of the cylindrical portions c and c resting upon the plate.

For convenience of use the different apertures 25 may be numbered in correspondence with different pens whereby any pen desired for particular use may be readily selected and the apertures will be of a diameter dependent upon the sizes of the portions c of the pensI being held. Unitary with plate 24 at each end thereof is a depending leg portion in the form of a rectangular plate 26, each having a transversely elongated slot 27 therein. These slots 27 are in a horizontal plane below but parallel with the apertured plate 24 and are thus adapted to receive a blotter sheet or other relatively stiff ink absorbing pad 28, which is capable of being threaded through the seats 27 and into horizontally supported position below the apertured plate 24 and from one leg 26 to the other. As is indicated particularly in Figs. 5 and 7 the vertical spacing between the plate 24 and the supported pad 28 is such that when the pens 10 are placed within the apertures 25, and supported by the plate 24 the tail pins t will be completely depressed within the stylus portion of the pens and will be thus held in the elevated position shown whereby any ink in the pens will be drained and absorbed by the pad 28.

The plate 24 is preferably provided with a handle 29 for facilitating movement of the holder from one position to another and the legs 26 may be provided with horizontal outwardly projecting feet 30. In Figs. l, 2 and 3 are shown a housing 31 preferably of transparent plastic material and which includes a solvent chamber 32 for the pen rack and holder illustrated in Figs. 4 to 7 and a second )olvent chamber 33 for various other forms of pens The chamber 32 includes a bottom wall 34 which is contained in the provision of a bottom wall 35 for the chamber 33. The chamber 32 is provided with a removable cover plate 36 which is provided with a manipulating handle 37 and the chamber 33 is provided with a removable cover plate 38 which is provided with a rela tivelyPlarge aperture 39 for receiving the stocks of the pens The holder as shown in Fig. 4 may be used alone in the course of a days work with the ink drained from the pens which are placed in the apertures 25 and absorbed by the pad 28. At the expiration of a work period, however, the holder with the pens therein may be introduced into the solvent chamber 32 for thorough removal of ink from the pens by a suitable solvent in the chamber as indicated at S in Figs. 2 and 3 and with the tail pin of each pen held in depressed position.

From the above disclosure, it will be appreciated how the improved rack and holder also the solvent bath compartment for use therewith provide a material asset to draftsmen and artists alike. Further, that by regular use of same, desired pens will always be available and in a clean workable condition.

What I claim is:

1. A rack for a drawing pen having a stepped cylindrical body providing an ink supply reservoir at its upper end and a tubular stylus at its lower end with an ink ow controllable valve pin mounted therein and movable axially therethrough, comprising a horizontal top plate provided with a vertical axis aperture therein for receiving and supporting the upper end portion of a pen body with its valve pin surrounding stylus portion depending therefrom, supporting legs for said plate comprising vertically disposed plates at opposite ends of said top plate, said end plates each being provided between its ends with a transversely elongated slot in a plane parallel with said horizontal top plate, and a valve pin depressing means comprising a third plate supported beneath the aperture of said top plate in parallel relation thereto and spaced therefrom a distance equal to the length of the depending stylus portion of said pen body with the opposite end plortions of said third plate slidably disposed within said s ots.

2. The structure according to claim 1 wherein said third plate comprises a pad of ink absorbing material.

3. The structure according to claim 1 wherein said top plate is provided with a plurality of vertical axis apertures numbered in conformity with pens to be supported therein providing ready selection of any pen desired for use.

4. A rack for a drawing pen having a stepped cylindrical body providing an ink supply reservoir at its upper end and a tubular stylus at its lower end with an ink ow controllable valve pin mounted therein and movable axially therethrough, comprising a horizontal top plate provided with a vertical axis aperture therein for receiving and supporting the upper end portion of a pen body with its valve pin surrounding stylus portion depending therefrom, supporting legs for said plate, valve pin depressing means supported beneath the aperture in said plate in parallel relation thereto and spaced therefrom a distance equal to the length of the depending stylus portion of said pen body and a transparent housing providing an ink solvent chamber for removable reception of said rack.

5. A rack for a valved pen comprising a horizontally disposed top plate having a vertical axis aperture therein for receiving and supporting a valved pen, supporting means for said top plate comprising vertically disposed plates adjacent opposite ends of said top plate, said end plates each being provided intermediate the ends thereof with a transversely elongated opening, and a pen valve opening and ink draining means comprising a third plate supported beneath the aperture of said top plate in parallel relation thereto and spaced therefrom a distance equal to a depending portion of a valved pen supported thereby with the opposite end portions of said third plate slidably received in said elongated openings, whereby upon the insertion of a valved pen in said aperture said valve opening and ink draining means opens the valve and drains the ink from the pen.

6. The structure according to claim 5 wherein said third plate comprises a pad of ink absorbing material.

7. The structure according to claim 5 wherein said top plate is provided with a plurality of vertical axis apertures numbered in conformity with pens to be supported therein providing ready selection of any pen desired for use.

8. A rack for a valved pen comprising a horizontally disposed top plate having a vertical axis aperture therein for receiving and supporting a valved pen, supporting means for said top plate comprising vertically disposed plates adjacent opposite ends of said top plate, said end plates each being provided intermediate the ends thereof with a transversely elongated opening, and a pen valve opening and ink draining means comprising a third plate supported beneath the aperture of said top plate in parallel relation thereto and spaced therefrom a distance equal to a depending portion of a valved pen supported thereby with the opposite end portions of said third plate slidably received in said elongated openings, and a transparent housing providing an ink solvent chamber for removable reception of said rack, whereby upon the insertion of a valved pen in said aperture said valve opening and ink draining means opens said valve and drains the ink from the pen.

9. A rack for a valved pen comprising a horizontally disposed top plate having an aperture therein for receiving and supporting a valved pen, supporting means for said top plate, said supporting means being provided with transversely elongated longitudinally aligned openings, and pen Valve opening and ink draining means comprising a second plate supported beneath the aperture of said top plate in parallel relation thereto and spaced therefrom a distance equal to a depending portion of a valved pen supported thereby with the opposite end portions of said second plate slidably received in said openings, whereby upon the insertion of a valved pen in said aperture said valve opening and ink draining means opens the valve and drains the ink from the pen.

10. The structure according to claim 9, wherein said second plate comprises a pad of ink absorbing material.

1l. The structure according to claim 9, wherein said top plate is provided with a plurality of apertures numbered in conformity with pens to be supported therein providing ready selection of any pen desired t'or use.

12. The structure defined in claim 9, in combination with a transparent housing providing an ink solvent chamber for removable reception of said rack.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 283,389 Goodwin Aug. 2l, 1883 597,729 Mitchell Jan. 25, 1898 648,928 Davis May 8, 1900 689,309 Hill Dec. l7, 1901

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US283389 *Sep 25, 1882Aug 21, 1883 Combined pen holder and cleaner
US597729 *Apr 9, 1897Jan 25, 1898 Pen wiper or cleaner
US648928 *Jan 16, 1899May 8, 1900Arthur G LeonardAntiseptic pencil or pen holder.
US689309 *Mar 12, 1901Dec 17, 1901Jeremiah Clinton HillPen-case for holding pens.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4442852 *Jul 30, 1982Apr 17, 1984Lord C DennisUltrasonic cleaner apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/115.00R, D19/79, D19/85, D11/157
International ClassificationB43M99/00
Cooperative ClassificationB43M99/00
European ClassificationB43M99/00