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Publication numberUS2699814 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 18, 1955
Filing dateSep 22, 1948
Priority dateSep 22, 1948
Publication numberUS 2699814 A, US 2699814A, US-A-2699814, US2699814 A, US2699814A
InventorsKahn Bertrand B
Original AssigneeKahn Bertrand B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nesting chair
US 2699814 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. B. KAHN NESTING CHAIR Jan. 1s, 1955 Filed sept. 22, 194e Cttornegs Jan. 128, V1955 l B B. KAHN 2,699,814

NESTING CHAIR Filed sept. 22, 1948 2 sheets-sheet 2 nventor @www Cttornegs United States Patent @hice 2,699,814 Patented Jan. 18, 1955 This invention relates to chairs -of suchconstruction that a plurality thereof can be verticallytnestedfor purposes of convenient storage.

One of the principal objects of the invention is to provide a nestable chair of simple construction adaptedfor economical production in quantity and which is light `in weight for convenient handling and stacking while at the same time possessing adequate strength and rigidity in use.

Another object is to provide such a chair wherein the major portion of the component parts may be readily produced by simple stamping and `forming operationsl from sheet rnetal and which is of such reinforced .construction as to have adequate rigidity without requiring braces or rungs between the legs.

An additional object is to provide such a chair having feet of novel construction secured in cooperatingirelation with the lower ends of the legs to receive an even` distribution of the weight of the chair and any load thereon and which also cooperate with the ends of the legs of thenext higher chair in a nested plurality thereof to `support adjacent chairs out of wedging or scraping contact with each other.

It is also an object of the invention to provide such a nestable chair which is adapted for economical construction in either straightback orarmchair form without material variation in its requirements of space for storage or use.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description, the accompanyingdrawings and the appended claims.

In the drawingsl Fig. 1 is a view in perspective of a vertically` n estable straightback chair constructed in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 2 is a similar view on a smaller scale showing two such chairs in vertically nested relation;

Fig. 3 is a view in side elevation of two nested armchairs in accordance with the invention; n

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the chair of Fig. l, a portion of t the seat being broken away to illustrateidetails of internal construction;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary View on a larger scale in vertical section approximately on theline 5-5 of Fig.4;

Fig. 6 is a detail plan view of one of the legs of the chair on a larger scale;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged view in front elevation of the foot and lower `end of one leg of each `of two vertically nested chairs;

Fig. 8 is a section on the line 8-8 of Fig. 7; and

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 5 showing a modied construction for the back of the chair.

`Referring to the drawings, which illustrate preferred embodiments of the invention, the seat 10 `of thechair is shown as formed of sheet metal, and it includes a de `pending peripheral flange 11 forming the sides of the seat and an annular flange 12 extending inwardly of the seat `from the lower edge of flange 11, these parts being readily made as an integral unit by blanking and forming from suitable sheet stock. The seat 10 may also be `formed on its upper surface asindicated at 1.3i and 14 to `afford increased comfort to the user. The seat l0 is i raised above the upper part of flange 11, as shown in Fig. 5, for greater rigidity, and iiange 11 curves outwardly and then downwardly to give a smooth contour` as` well as increased rigidity to the seat as a whole. i

In order to obtain adequate rigidity for the seat, and particularly to brace the seat against diagonal buckle betweenicorners, atpair of bracing straps 1S are provided as shown in Fig. 4. Each of these straps is welded or otherwise secured at its ends 16 to the annular ange12 at diagonally opposite corners of the seat, and the straps are also welded together at 17 where they cross belowthe center of the seat. This construction has been found. to impart adequate rigidity to the seat and chair as a whole and thus to make unnecessary the use of rungs or.other braces for the legs.

Each of the legs 20 of the chairis shown asformed Vof sheet stock, and the upper endof the leg includes-a curved portion 21, concave in section, and tab portions 22 .shaped to conform with the similarly curvedV corners ofthe seat, allot` these corners being of the same conguration and the intermediate parts of theperipheryof the seat being convexly curved as indicated at 24 in Fig; 4. In addition, the lower part of the seat flange lll is inwardly oset or set back `at 23 to receive the upper end ofthe leg, these portions of the legs and seat being welded together and thus presenting a smooth outer surface as shown in Figs. 1 to 3. The set back portion `23 may extend around the entire periphery of theseat, or it may be formed in sections only at each corner of the seat, with each section of the proper length to receive the upper ends of the legs, the off-setting operation being readily performed simultaneously with the turning inwardly of the iiange i2. The legs 2d incline downwardly and outwardly from their upper ends, and the curve Vof the part 2l is maintained throughout the major portion of the length of the leg, as shown in Fig. 6, to facilitate nesting and stacking of a plurality ofthe chairs.

Each leg 20 is provided with a foot 25 constructed as best shown in Figs. 7 and 8. This foot 25 `inay'be readily formed of plastic, fiber, wood or other suitable material,` and it includes a frusta-conical upper portion 25 having its 'oase 27 uppermost and an enlargedlower portion thus providing an intermediate shoulder-portion 29. The lower end of the leg includes twowing-like parts 3i) which encircle and grip the frusto=conicalfoot portion 26 above `the shoulder 29 to securexthe leg and foot together. The connection Vbetween the foot :and'leg is readily made by rolling the wing portions `30 around the foot in `a suitable die, providing a quick` andsimple connection without the useof pins or Vother fastening means while at the same time giving a iinishedappearance to the end of the leg. In addition, with the `end of the leg thus seated on the shoulder portion 29 `of the foot, the weight of the chair and any loadthereon is evenly distributed around the periphery of the foot for greater strength in use.

It will also be noted that when two similarchairs `are stacked as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the upper endsf27 of the feet on the lower chair present shoulders positioned laterally outwardly of the remainder of the legs to receive the lower ends of the feet of the upper chair. Theheight of each foot Z5 is greater than the vmaximum combined overall `dininsions of the seat lli), including the flange 11, and the two adjacent chairs are thus supportedupon their legs in vertically spaced relation and with their legs in laterally spaced relation, as shown in Fig.. 8. Thisprevents the legs of adjacent nested chairs from'wedging togetheralong their sides, whichaie kept in spaced relation to each other, and also the bottom of the seat of the upper chair is similarly held spaced from the seat of the lower chair to prevent the latter from being scratched, dented or otherwise undesirably affected thereb, this clearance space between the seats being indicatedat 31 in Fig. 3.

A back 33 of sheet stock is provided for the chair, the lower end 34 of the .back being welded to the -set `back portion 23 of flange il .and being curved about substantially the same radius as the back of the seat. `The back 33 is inclined rearwardly to facilitate stacking or nesting, and it is braced by a supporting member 35, which is shown as formed of suitable rod or tube-stock and has the general shape of an inverted U. The central portion 36 of member 35 is secured to the upper end of back 33, as by rolling the upper edge 37 (Fig. 5) ofithe back 34 of the back to impart desired rigidity to the back as a whole.

The back 33 is shown as formed from an initially rectangularpanel of sheet metal, thus promoting economical production with minimum wastage of stock, particularly as compared with backs of hollow construction or irregular shape, or backs wherein the blank must be initially of a width equal to the width of the finished back. Rearwardly extending rib portions 40 are formed in the back 33 for increased comfort as well as rigidity, and the side edges of the back are rolled at 41 to avoid sharp edges with which the user might come in contact. 1t will also be noted in Fig. 4 that the back 33 and member 35 are proportioned and arranged to leave openings therebetween adjacent each of the rear corners of the seat to receive the rear legs of the adjacent upper chairs when a plurality of the chairs are stacked as shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 3 shows two chairs of substantially the same construction just described except that the supporting member 45 for the back is of different configuration from the member'35 in Figs. l and 2 and is formed to provide arms for the chair. The side portions of the member 45 are longer than the corresponding parts of member 35, and they are curved forwardly and then downwardly to provide portions 46 in proper position to serve as arms for the chair. Otherwise these chairs are of the same construction as those of the straightback variety described in connection with the other views. Fig. 3 shows that the armchairs will readily nest in the same manner as the straightback chairs shown in Figs. l and 2 without requiring more space vertically or horizontally. Fig. 3 also showshow the backs of adjacent nested chairs are held in spaced relation to prevent wedging or scraping contact therebetween and with the plurality of chairs in vertically centered relation.

Fig. 9 shows a chair wherein the back is formed of a plurality of tubular members 50 in combination with a supporting member 51 similar to the member 35. As shown, each tube 50 may be of substantially the same diameter as member 51 and is flattened and formed at its upper end 52 to engage behind the member 51, thus avoiding irregular projections in contact with the back of the user. The tube end 52 may be secured to member 51 by a screw 53 as shown, or the screw 53 may be secured coaxially to the end of tube 50 and screwed directly into member 51 to present a ush construction. At its lower end 55, each tube 50 is attened to fit the back of the chair seat, and part 55 may be bolted, weldedV or riveted to the flange portion 11 of the seat as indicated at 56.

It will accordingly be seen that the invention provides nestable chairs which are readily adapted for economical quantity production. The seat, the legs and the back are all made of sheet and tube stock, and can be produced by relatively simple blanking and forming operations. The assembling of the parts is also quite simple, requiring only spot welding or riveting to secure the legs and back to the seat. The finished chairs possess adequate rigidity to resist the bending forces commonly encountered in use, and the arrangement of the feet as described and shown further protects the chairs from damage by wedging or scraping contact with each other when in nested relation. It will also be noted that this construction and arrangement facilitates separation of the desired number of nested chairs from a stack thereof, since there is no wedging contact between adjacent chairs to hinder separation thereof.

WhileV the forms of apparatus herein described constitute preferred embodiments of the invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to these precise forms of apparatus, and that changes may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention which is defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A chair of the character described adapted to be arranged with a plurality of similar chairs in vertically shoulder positioned above the lower end thereof and an upper portion engaged within its associated said leg, the lower ends of said legs being of smaller diameter than said shoulders and being positioned in abutting relation with said shoulders to transmit the load on said legs to said feet around the circumference of said shoulders, and means carried by the lower end of each said leg forming an upwardly facing shoulder in position to receive one of the feet of the next higher chair of said plurality of vertically nested chairs, said shoulders being spaced above the lower ends of said feet on said legs by a distance sufficient to support said next higher nested chair in spaced relation to prevent relative wedging of said chairs.

2. A chair of the character described adapted to be arranged with a plurality of similar chairs in vertically nested relation and comprising a seat portion, legs secured to said seat and extending downwardly and outwardly therefrom, and feet secured to said legs, each said foot including upper and lower portions and an intermediate shoulder portion, each said leg including an outwardly extending portion substantially encircling said foot above said shoulder portion to hold said foot and leg in `fixed relation with the upper end of said foot exposed, said feet being of such vertical dimensions as to receive on said exposed upper ends the lower ends of the feet of the next higher chair when vertically nested to support adjacent ones of said plurality of chairs in vertically spaced relation preventing wedging thereof.

3. A chair of the character described adapted to be arranged with a plurality of similar chairs in vertically nested relation and comprising a seat portion, legs secured to said seat and extending downwardly and outwardly therefrom, feet secured to said legs and each including a lower portion and an upper frusto-conical portion having the base thereof uppermost, said legs each including a frusto-conical tube portion encircling said frusto-conical foot portion to hold said foot and leg in fixed relation with the upper ends of said feet in position to receive and support the lower ends of the feet of the next higher chair when vertically nested, said feet being of such vertical dimensions as to maintain adjacent ones of saidnested chairs in vertically spaced relation preventing wedging thereof.

4. A chair of the character described adaptedV to be arranged with a plurality of similar chairs in vertically nested relation and comprising a seat portion, a plurality of legs extending downwardly and inclined outwardly from said seat portion, feet secured to the lower ends of said legs, each of said feet including an inverted frustoconical upper portion and a lower portion of greater diameter at the upper end thereof than the lower end of said frusto-conical portion to form therewith a circumferential shoulder spaced above the lower end of said foot, the lower end of each said leg including a frustoconical portion substantially encircling said frusto-conical portion of its associated said foot to hold said foot on said leg with the lower end of said leg engaging said shoulder on said foot, and the upper ends of said feet forming shoulders positioned to receive the lower ends of the legs of the next higher leg of said plurality of vertically nested chairs, said feet being of sufficient height to support said next higher nested chair in spaced relation preventing relative wedging of said chairs.

5. A chair of the character described adapted to be arranged with a plurality of similar chairs in vertically nested relation and comprising a seat portion, a plurality of legs extending downwardly and inclined outwardly from said seat portion, feet secured to the lower ends of said legs, each of said feet including a circumferential shoulder positioned above the lower end thereof, the portion of each said foot above said shoulder tapering outwardly, and the lower end of each said leg including portions substantially encircling said tapering upper portion of its associated said foot and in clamping relation therewith to'hold said foot within said leg, the lower ends of said legs being of smaller diameter than said shoulders and being positioned in abutting relation with said shoulders to transmit load on said legs to said feet through said shoulders, and the upper ends of said feet forming shoulders positioned to receive the lower ends of the legs of the next higher leg of said plurality of vertically nested chairs, said feet being of sufficient height to support said next higher nested chair in spaced relation preventing relative wedging of said chairs.

6. A chair of the character described adapted to be arranged with a plurality of similar chairs in vertically nested relation and comprising a seat portion, legs secured to said seat and extending downwardly and outwardly therefrom, a back member of sheet metal having the lower end thereof secured to said seat and extending upwardly and rearwardly in inclined relation therewith, a supporting member for said back member, said supporting member being a rod initially separate from said back and having the general configuration of an inverted U, means connecting the central portion of said supporting member to the upper end of said back member, and means connecting the ends of said supporting member to said seat at positions forward of the lower end of said back member to form a brace between said seat and said back member and to leave spaces adjacent the rear corners of said seat for receiving the rear legs of the next higher chairs when vertically nested.

7. A chair of the character described adapted to be arranged with a plurality of similar chairs in vertically nested relation and comprising a seat portion, legs secured to said seat and extending downwardly and outwardly therefrom, a back member of sheet metal having the lower end thereof secured to said seat and extending upwardly and rearwardly in inclined relation therewith, a supporting member for said back member, said supporting member being a rod initially separate from said back and having the general configuration of an inverted U, means securing the central portion of said supporting member to the upper end of said back member, the side portions of said supporting member extending forwardly and then downwardly from said back member to form arms for said chair, and means securing the lower ends of said supporting member to said seat to brace said back member with relation to said seat and to leave spaces adjacent the rear corners of said seat for receving the rear legs of the next higher chairs when vertically nested.

8. A chair of the character described adapted to be arranged with a plurality of similar chairs in vertically nested relation and comprising a seat of sheet material including an integral depending peripheral ange, an annular ange extending inwardly of said seat from the lower edge of said depending ange and integral therewith, a pair of bracing straps secured to said annular flange at diagonally opposite portions of said seat and crossing each other at approximately the center of said seat, means securing the crossing portions of said straps together, a back secured to said seat and inclining upwardly and rearwardly therefrom, bracing means extending downwardly from the upper portion of said back and secured to said seat forwardly of the lower end of said back, legs secured to said seat and inclining outwardly and downwardly therefrom to facilitate nesting of said chairs, means carried by the lower end of each said leg forming an upwardly facing shoulder spaced from the lower end of said leg by a distance greater than the maximum combined vertical dimension of said seat and flanges, said shoulders being adapted to receive the lower ends of the legs of the next higher chair of said plurality of chairs to support adjacent ones of said vertically nested chairs in spaced relation preventing relative wedging of said chairs.

9. A chair of the character described adapted to be arranged with a plurality of similar chairs in vertically nested relation and comprising a seat of sheet metal including an integral depending peripheral ange, legs of sheet metal secured to said ange and inclining outwardly and downwardly therefrom to facilitate nesting of said chairs, means carried by the lower end of each said leg forming thereon an upwardly faced shoulder near the lower end thereof, said shoulders being positioned to receive the lower ends of the legs of the next higher chair of said plurality of chairs to support the same, and said shoulders being spaced from the lower ends of said legs by a distance sutliciently greater than the maximum combined vertical dimension of said seat and said ange to support adjacent ones of vertically nrtlestedf chairs in spaced relation preventing wedging t ereo References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 890,556 Chatem June 9, 1908 950,194 Stockwell Feb. 22, 1910 1,205,186 Fuchs Nov. 21, 1916 1,408,114 Mathieu Feb. 28, 1922 1,664,356 Dellert Mar. 27, 1928 1,744,799 Provisor Jan. 28, 1930 1,755,896 Rastetter Apr. 22, 1930 1,914,646 Rand lune 20, 1933 2,306,879 Hamilton et al. Dec. 29, 1942 2,408,337 Panzer Sept. 24, 1946 2,437,303 Molla Mar. 9, 1948 2,527,603 Wallance Oct. 31, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS 293,305 Great Britain Nov. 1, 1928 434,020 Germany Sept. 18, 1926 650,454 France Sept. 24, 1928

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US2778410 *Oct 19, 1950Jan 22, 1957Bode PaulChair
US2936024 *Jun 10, 1959May 10, 1960Heywood Wakefield CoStacking chairs
US2936826 *Sep 27, 1956May 17, 1960Brunswick Balke Collender CoOne-piece chair
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Classifications
U.S. Classification297/239, 248/188.8, D06/380, D06/370
International ClassificationA47C3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47C3/04, A47C7/002
European ClassificationA47C7/00B, A47C3/04