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Publication numberUS2700251 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 25, 1955
Filing dateOct 16, 1951
Priority dateJan 28, 1949
Publication numberUS 2700251 A, US 2700251A, US-A-2700251, US2700251 A, US2700251A
InventorsLucien Bertaux Jean
Original AssigneeMarx & Co Louis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vibrating toy
US 2700251 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 25, 1955 J. 1.. BERTAUX 2,700,251

VIBRATING TOY Original Filed Jan. 28, 1949 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

ean .Luu'en .Berlaaac ATTOR N EYS Jan. 25, 1955 J. L. BERTAUX 2,700,251

VIBRA/TING TOY Original Filed Jan. 28, 1949 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. Jean Lucwn Bertram ATTORNEYS J. L. BERTAUX VIBRATING TOY Jan. 25, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Original Filed Jan. 28, 1949 l INVENTOR. Jean Lucwn Berhwx ATTORNEYS VIBRATING TOY Jean Lucien Bertaux, Paris, France, assignor, by mesne assignments, to Louis Marx & Company, Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Original application January 28, 1949, Serial .No. 73,419. Divided and this application October 16, 1951, Serial No. 252,521

8 fiiaims. (Cl. 46-445) This invention relates to a movable toy which is powered by a vibrating element.

Broadly speaking the invention comprises a toy which is mounted on a track and a vibrating element which'is connected to the track. The toy is responsive to vibratory movement of the track in one direction but it is not responsive to vibratory movement of the track in the opposite direction. In essence therefore the invention comprises a track which is adapted to vibrate, a vibrating member which is connected to the track to cause it to vibrate and a toy which may rest on the track and which is responsive to vibratory movementsthereof.

Still more specifically the invention includes a track which is combined with means of imparting to the track an alternating movement of translation in its own plane in a straight-line direction which may be changed at will to another straight-line direction. The toy which cooperates with said track is provided with a finger which may constitute a point or wedge-shaped member and which rests obliquely upon the track in such manner that the track carries the toy with it in one direction .of

its own displacement and fails, by reason of the inertia of the toy, to carry the toy with it in the opposite direction of its own displacement.

When the track is caused to vibrate, it moves in opposite directions along a given straight line and .the toy moves with the track in only one of said directions, along said straight line. To change the direction of travel of the toy all that need be done is to change the direction of vibration of the track. The direction of travel of the toy will automatically change accordingly.

As used in the present application, the term track is intended to denote any kind of suitable supporting surface for the toy which may have imparted to it vibratory movement. Thus the track may consist of a table or plate and it is immaterial what size or shape it assumes. It may for example comprise a rectangle which is disposed on a perfectly horizontal plane.

The term finger as used herein is intended to desig- .nate any kind of track engaging member which affords greater resistance or opposition to the movement of the track in one direction and lesser resistance or-opposition to the movement of the track in the opposite direction. The finger may take the form of a pointed member such as a needle which is arranged obliquely with respect to the plane of the track or it may take the form of a wedgeshaped member having at least one side edge which lies .at an acute angle with respect to the track. These forms are merely illustrative of the broad class which is herein designated by means of the term finger.

The term toy as used herein is intended to denote any kind of movable member which may be supported on a vibrating track for the purpose of inducing linear or other movement thereof with respect to said track. The toy may comprise a vehicle such as an automobile or an animal such as a race-horse. It may assume other forms equally as well.

The present application is a division of my parent application Serial No. 73,419 filed January 28, 1949, and entitled Vibrating Toys, which application has since been abandoned.

Preferred embodiments of this invention are shown in the accompanying drawing in which Fig. l is a perspective view of the first of said embodiments, said view being partly in vertical section and showing a rectangular track;

nited States Patent O Fig. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary sectional view thereof showing a horse and an automobile on the track;

Fig. 3 is a plan view thereof;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view of a variant of the mechanism, in'perspective;

Fig. 5 is a schematic view, in perspective, of a variant of the apparatus, showing it with two control wheels which enable two players to cause movement of the movable toys on the vibrating track; and

Fig. 6 is a schematic view, partly in section, of a corresponding mechanism.

In the form of invention shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 the toy comprises a box whose base .1 is provided with feet 2 so that it may be supported on a table or similar support. A vertical elastic or resilient rod .3, made of steel for example, is rigidly attached to the base. The rod may be threaded at its lower end 4 to receive a nut '5. Said threaded end is reduced to form a shoulder against which washer 6 may hear. The shoulder is designated in Fig. 2 by means of the reference character 7 and it is by means of said washer, threaded end and nut that the rod may be secured to the base.

Rod 3, with its geometric axis at XX, extends to the top 8 of the box through which it freely passes. Upon the upper threaded end 9 of the rod, which is provided with a shoulder at the level of the upper surface of the top of said box, a thin plate 11 rests, being fastened to said rod by means of a nut 10. Plate 11 is made of light material such as aluminum, wood or cardboard and its lower surface, which is very smooth, rests upon top 8 of the box. its upper surface may be smooth or slightly roughened, as desired.

Inside the box, rod 3 carries -two cheeks 12 and 13., integral with the rod or attached to it, of .an electromagnet with its winding 14. The two alternating current lead-in and lead-out wires .15 pass out of the coil through a hole 16 in lower cheek 13. These wires are connected to a plug 17 which may be inserted into an alternating current receptacle. The connection to the supply of current is a direct one for one of the wires but the other wire has a rheostat connected thereto which is indicated in the drawing by means of the reference character 18 and which is mounted on vertical wall 19 of the box.

The magnetic circuit of the electro-magnet is completed, through a small air gap e, through an armature 20 which is tangential to the air gap, and through the cheeks of the electro-magnet. This armature 20 is attached by screws 21 to a disc .22. The disc turns on .a hub 23 within a socket 24 fitted in hole 25 of the top 8 of the box. Said socket and said hub are concentric with rod 3 when the rod is at rest. Their diameter is such that the rod has a radial clearance of at least twice the size of air gap e inside the hub 23 through which the rod passes freely. A washer is inserted between disc 22 ilzrld gle inside surface of top 8 of the box, as shown in In contact with the lower face of disc 22 is a driving friction roller 27 made of rubber or other material having a high friction coefficient. This coetficient may be increased by providing a roughened surface on disc 22 or on roller 27 or on both the disc and the roller. Roller 27 is keyed to the end of a shaft .28 that turns within a bearing 29 which is supported by the top 8 of the box. This shaft passes through side wall 19 of the box and carries a hand wheel 30 which, when rotated, causes roller .27 and hence disc 22 to turn in one direction or another.

The toy is completed by placing one orpmore movable objects such as automobile '31 or animal 32 upon plate 11. The toy may beprovided with a plane surface .34 by which its rests upon plate 11 or it may be provided with wheels 33 for the same purpose. The toy should also be supported either by a short point or needle 35 arranged obliquely or by a wedge-shaped piece 36 likewise arranged obliquely, sloping from top to bottom, and from front to rear. This piece may be made of metal, rubber, cork, wood, or any other similar material with a high friction coefiicient.

Operation is as follows: Disc 22 is -at.rest whenanaliternating current is supplied to coil .14, its intensity being regulated by rheostat 18. The coil is alternately attracted to armature and drawn back by the elasticity of rod 3, thereby causing the rod to vibrate in a plane such as YY (Fig. 3) perpendicular to armature 20. The vibration frequency of the rod is twice the frequency of the alternating current. It follows that plate 11 which is attached to the free end of the rod is causedto engage in reciprocatory movement on a straight line which coincides with vertical plane YY. The movable objects 31, 32 will arrange themselves in parallel relation to said straight line movement of the plate. When plate 11 is displaced in the direction of arrow f (Fig. 2) needle 35 and wedge 36 are carried along in the same direction, and with them, toys 31, 32. When plate 11 moves in the opposite direction, said toys remain motionless by reason of their inertia. The plate simply slides under needle 35 and wedge 36. It follows that the moving objects move in the direction of arrow f in successive jerks. It will be seen that the vibration frequency induced by an alternating current of 50 or 60 cycles is sufliciently high for this displacement of the moving objects to appear to be continuous. The amplitude of the oscillations, and hence the speed of the moving objects, may be varied by regulating the current strength by means of rheostat 18.

The slopes of needle 35 and wedge 36 have been assumed to be in the same direction. It is seen that if the two moving objects were placed back to back, they would move in opposite directions.

When disc 22 is rotated by means of hand wheel 30 and roller 27, armature 20 is displaced and with it the plane of vibration of rod 3. As the plane of vibration YY of rod 3 shifts about the geometrical axis XX of said rod, the moving objects align themselves accordingly, that is parallel at all times to the plane of vibration.

Fig. 4 shows a variant in which a frame 38 is attached rigidly to the end of vibrating rod 37. This frame carries a motor 39 whose shaft 40 carries an eccentric weight 41 (which may very simply be realized by bending the shaft). The presence of this eccentric weight produces vibrations in rod 37 and in all of the apparatus borne by it. If this assembly were free, it would describe a cone whose apex is located at the end of the rods seat, the vibration frequency corresponding to the number of revolutions of the motor shaft per second. But at the extension of rod 37 frame 38 bears a cylindrical extension rod 42 which moves in an oblong opening 43 which is substantially equal in width to the diameter of extension rod 42, said opening being cut in the hub 44 of a disc 45 which is analogous to disc 22 previously mentioned.

It follows that rod 37 and everything carried by it can oscillate only in the plane which passes through longitudinal axis ZZ of opening 43, giving rise to the alternating translation movement of plate 45a which is attached by nut 46 to the threaded end 47 of extension rod 42. Disc 45 can be rotated with its rub 44 in bushing 43 by means of friction roller 43 and hence the directipfii ZZ of the oscillations of plate 45a can be varied at w Another variant, shown in Figs. 5 and 6, includes a friction roller 50 rotating in bearings 50a and acting upon disc 51. This roller can be connected by means of a sliding clutch 52 or 52 with a radial slot 53, 53' and by keys 54, or 54', 55' to one or the other of the two control shafts 56, 56' which are fastened to hand wheels 57, 57'. These two clutches are fastened to two clutch shifters 58, 58' which are carried on a rod 59 moving in bearings 60 and connected through a connecting rod 61 to the crank 62 of a clockwork mechanism 62a. This clockwork mechanism may be started by placing a token or coin in an opening 63 in box 64.

Attached to rod 59 is a brush 65 connected by a conductor 66 and one prong of a plug 67 to one pole of an electric current supply, the other pole thereof being connected by means of another conductor 68 in parallel with two electric light bulbs 69, 69' which are disposed in box 64 behind hand wheels 57 and 57. The electric between roller 50 and rod 56.

circuits are closed through conductors 70 and 79' 'to blocks 71 and 71', brush 65 making contact with each block in turn, depending upon the position of rod 59.

This arrangement functions as follows: Clockwork 62a is started and it moves rod 59 in the direction of arrow f and then in the reverse direction. This causes clutch-'52 to disengage and after the disengagement of roller 50 from shaft 56, clutch 52' provides engagement At the same time bulb 69 will be deenergized and' bulb 69' will be energized, indicating to the player holding hand wheel 57 that his turn to play has ended and indicating to the player holding hand wheel 57' that his turn to play has started. The time allotted to each player to play the game will be limited by the clockwork mechanism.

The foregoing is of course purely illustrative and variations are in order. For example the friction drive of the disc and roller may be replaced by a gear drive in which a pinion is substituted for the roller and a circular rack is substituted for, or placed upon, the disc.

It will be appreciated that the foregoing is descriptive of only some of the variations of which the present invention is susceptible and other variations may be had within the broad scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A toy comprising a stationary base on which a generally horizontally vibratile surface which is extensive in dimension in two mutually perpendicular directions is vibratably but non-rotatably mounted, a source of linear vibration having at least two relatively vibratile parts, means connecting one part of said source to said surface in order to vibrate the surface relative to the base, means including a rotatably adjustable element which is rotatable relative to the base and which carries another part of said source of vibration for angular movement with respect to said one part in order to carry the direction of vibration of said surface relative to the base, said rotatable element being mounted with its axis of rotation generally upright and substantially fixed relative to the base so that its vibration is minimized, a movable figure adapted to rest on said surface and having a sloping finger bearing on the surface to cause the figure to move over said surface, and manually operable means to turn the aforesaid adjustable element and so to control the direction of movement of the movable figure without change in the orientation of the vibratile surface.

2. A toy comprising a stationary base on which a generally horizontally vibratile surface which is extensive in dimension in two mutually perpendicular directions is vibratably but non-rotatably mounted, a source of linear vibration including an electromagnet adapted to be energized by means of alternating current and an armature disposed near said magnet with resulting relative vibration of the armature and magnet, means including a rotatably adjustable element which is rotatable relative to the base and which carries one of said relatively vibratable members, said rotatably adjustable element being mounted with its axis of rotation generally upright and substantially fixed relative to the base, the other of said relatively vibratile members being connected to said surface, whereby the direction of vibration of said surface relative to the base depends on the orientation of the element, a movable figure adapted to rest on said surface and having a sloping finger bearing on the surface to cause the figure to move over said surface, and manually operable means to turn the element and so to control the direction of movement of the movable figure.

3. A toy comprising a stationary base on which a generally horizontally vibratile surface which is extensive in dimension in two mutually perpendicular directions is vibratably but non-rotatably mounted, a source of linear vibration including an electromagnet adapted to be energized by means of alternating current and connected to said surface, an armature disposed near said magnet with resulting relative vibration of the armature and magnet, a rotatably adjustable element which is rotatable relative to the base and which carries said armature, said rotatably adjustable element being mounted with its axis of rotation generally upright and substantially fixed relative to the base, whereby the direction of vibration of said magnet and surface relative to the base depends on the orientation of the element and armature relative to the base, a movable figure adapted to rest on said surface and having asloping finger bearing on the surface to cause the figure to move over said surface, and manually operable means to turn the element and so to control the direction of movement of the movable figure.

4. A toy comprising a stationary base on which a generally horizontally vibratile surface which is extensive in dimension in two mutually perpendicular directions is vibratably but non-rotatably mounted, a source of linear vibration including an electromagnet adapted to be energized by means of alternating current and an armature disposed near said magnet with resulting relative vibration of the armature and magnet, means including a rotatably adjustable element which is rotatable relative to the base and which carries one of said relatively vibratable members, said rotatably adjustable element being mounted with its axis of rotation generally upright and substantially fixed relative to the base, an externally accessible manually operable steering wheel for changing the orientation of the rotatably adjustable element relative to the base, the other of said relatively vibratable members being connected to said surface, and a movable figure adapted to rest on said surface and having a sloping finger bearing on the surface to cause the figure to move over said surface, whereby the direction of vibration of said surface relative to the base depends on the orientation of the element, and consequently the direction of movemfintlof the movable figure is controlled by the steering w ee 5. A toy comprising a stationary base on which a generally horizontally vibratile surface which is extensive in dimension in two mutually perpendicular directions is vibratably but non-rotatably mounted, a source of linear vibration having at least two relatively vibratile parts, one of said parts being a source of circular vibration, means connecting said part to said surface in order to vibrate the surface relative to the base, another part being a linearly slotted member to convert the circular vibration to linear vibration, means including a rotatably adjustable element which is rotatable relative to the base and which carries said slotted part in order to vary the direction of the slot and consequently the direction of vibration of said surface relative to the base, said rotatable element being mounted with its axis of rotation generally upright and substantially fixed relative to the base so that its vibration is minimized, a movable figure adapted to rest on said surface and having a sloping finger bearing on the surface to cause the figure to move over said surface, and manually operable means to turn the aforesaid adjustable element and so to control the direction of movement of the movable figure without change in the orientation of the vibratile surface.

6. A toy comprising a stationary base on which a generally horizontally vibratile surface which is extensive in dimension in two mutually perpendicular direction is vibratably but non-rotatably mounted, a source of linear vibration having at least two relatively vibratile parts, one of said parts being a source of circular vibration, means connecting said part to said surface in order to vibrate the surface relative to the base, another part being a linearly slotted member to convert the circular vibration to linear vibration, means including a rotatably adjustable element which is rotatable relative to the base and which carries said slotted part in order to vary the direction of the slot and consequently the direction of vibration of said surface relative to the base, said rotatable element being mounted with its axis of rotation generally upright and substantially fixed relative to the base so that its vibration is minimized, a movable figure adapted to rest on said surface and having a sloping finger bearing on the surface to cause the figure to move over said surface, and an externally accessible manually operable steering Wheel to turn the aforesaid adjustable element and so to control the direction of movement of the movable figure without change in the orientation of the vibratile surface.

7. A toy comprising a stationary base on which a generally horizontally vibratile surface which is extensive in dimension in two mutually perpendicular directions is vibratably but non-rotatably mounted, a source of linear vibration having at least two relatively vibratile parts, means connecting one part of said source to said surface in order to vibrate the surface relative to the base, means including a rotatably adjustable element which is rotatable relative to the base and which carries another part of said source of vibration for angular movement with respect to said one part in order to vary the direction of vibration of said surface relative to the base, said rotatable element being mounted with its axis of rotation generally upright and substantially fixed relative to the base so that its vibration is minimized, a movable figure adapted to rest on said surface and having a sloping finger bearing on the surface to cause the figure to move over said surface, and a plurality of manually operable means to turn the element, clutch mechanism for eifectively coupling one of said manually operable means to said element while disconnecting another so as to connect one or another of said manually operable means to turn the rotatably adjustable element in order to control the direction of movement of the movable figure.

8. A toy comprising a stationary base on which a generally horizontally vibratile surface which is extensive in dimension in two mutually perpendicular directions is vibratably but non-rotatably mounted, a source of linear vibration having at least two relatively vibratile parts, means connecting one part of said source to said surface in order to vibrate the surface relative to the base, means including a rotatably adjustable element which is rotatable relative to the base and which carries another part of said source of vibration for angular movement with respect to said one part in order to vary the direction of vibration of said surface relative to the base, said rotatable element being mounted with its axis of rotation generally upright and substantially fixed relative to the base so that its vibration is minimized, a movable figure adapted to rest on said surface and having a sloping finger bearing on the surface to cause the figure to move over said surface, and a plurality of manually operable means to turn the element, clutch mechanism for effectively coupling one of said manually operable means to said element while disconnecting another, and means including clockwork mechanism to automatically shift the clutch mechanism so as to sequentially connect one or another of said manually operable means to turn the rotatably adjustable element in order to control the direction of movement of the movable figure.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,539,418 Joha May 26, 1925 1,601,247 Garbarini Sept. 28, 192.6

1,959,755 Callol May 22, 1934 FOREIGN PATENTS 434,797 Great Britain Aug. 30, 1935

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1539418 *Mar 30, 1922May 26, 1925Joha Elmer NChance-controlled racing game
US1601247 *Jul 13, 1923Sep 28, 1926Andre GarbariniApparatus for the production and maintenance and utilization of vibratory motion
US1959755 *Feb 10, 1933May 22, 1934Co Callol JoseRace game
GB434797A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2772512 *Mar 23, 1955Dec 4, 1956Tudor Metal Products CorpPlaying piece for game
US3463495 *Oct 11, 1967Aug 26, 1969Christensen Donald RagnvaldVariable vibration pattern game device
US6238263Aug 19, 1999May 29, 2001Richard BennettDevice for soothing, distracting and stimulating a child
US6254095 *Sep 28, 1999Jul 3, 2001Bon-Gee LiuTable horse racing
US8273038 *Jun 20, 2008Sep 25, 2012Woggon Dennis AMethod of neuromusculoskeletal proprioceptive re-education and development of a living body and apparatus therefor
DE1120958B *Oct 31, 1957Dec 28, 1961Max ErnstSchwingplatte mit auf ihr bewegbaren Spielfiguren
EP1460005A1 *Mar 11, 2004Sep 22, 2004Petek DusanRotational vibrational drive
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/3, 74/126, 74/25
International ClassificationA63H18/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H18/007
European ClassificationA63H18/00D