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Publication numberUS2700483 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 25, 1955
Filing dateFeb 26, 1953
Priority dateFeb 26, 1953
Publication numberUS 2700483 A, US 2700483A, US-A-2700483, US2700483 A, US2700483A
InventorsKenneth L Cook, Woolson H Davis, Paul L Jarvis
Original AssigneeRuger Equipment Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mine timber setting lift
US 2700483 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 25, 1955 K. L. COOK ET AL MINE TIMBER SETTING LIFT 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb, 26, 1953 VII-HE. 11

ATTORNEYS Jan. 25, 1955 COOK E AL 2,700,483

MINE TIMBER SETTING LIFT Filed Feb. 26, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 l8 IO 23 Q [7 5 I 28 3| 37 3 2o 27 J I 34 35 2| as I6 58 '2 T ao J/ 53 [FEE]. EB V 59%] i 5| 6| 4O 49 KENNE 'o K BY H L. o

A TORNEYS 1955 K. L. COOK ET AL MINE TIMBER SETTING LIFT 5 Sheets-Shet :5

Filed Feb. 26, 1953 FHEJMII] United States Patent 7 2,700,483 Patented Jan. '25, 1955 SETTING LIFT .8 Claims. '(Cl. 214-149 -.Our .inventionrelateszto a mine timber lift. It has to more particularly, with alifting-unit for-use'on-a mine car, .or other :suitable mobilecarriage or vehicle, for handling timbers, particularly the timbers used for originally supporting the roof of the mine and for lifting them into place against the roof and holding them in such place until they are 'shoredup in ;place. Obviously, 'the device is also useful in removing .and replacing 'the timbers, as well as pulling timber stumps in the :mine and in the preliminary handlingof the timbers preparatory to final positioning.

Various .lift devices have been provided .in the past. They are usually very-complicatedand expensive. Furthermore, they have .other disadvantages. Fortexample, they .areso-designed that in .holding the timbers against thereof they mayapplywxcessive pressure .thereto which, injitself, would .cause loosening vofmaterial and caving .of the ,root. .Also, athetimber-engagingheads on these prior art lifts have not been such as to.obtainmaximumefiiciency in handling .the .timbers.

It is the object .of our invention :to .provide a simple and inexpensive lift device which can handlerand set the -mine timbers .efliciently .and accurately and which is so designed as topreclude the application .of excessive forces to .the mine.roof.

The lift of .this invention is preferably,- though .not neces sarily,.of thehydraulic type, and includes .o'il-powered lift means which is non-explosive so that .it .can be used with safety .in a .mine.

The preferred embodiment of our :invention is illustrated inthe. accompanyingdrawings wherein. similarcharacters .of reference designate corresponding .parts and wherein:

Figure 1.is.a..side.elevational viewof the tiniberJift of our .invention. supported on a mine car.

LFigure.2,is a plan viewof amine car ermine vehicle showing wells at diagonally-opposed corners .for receiving the vertical .mastof ourtim'berlift.

Figure .3 -is .a .side elevational viewtof the timber lift removed .from .the .car or vehicle.

.Figure 4 is a.perspective view of the .tirriber.handling headof .thelitt.

.Figure 5 is a .diagrammatic vfiewlof thelhydraulicsystem ofthelift.

.Figure '6.is.a detail insectionof the control valve .and pressure-relief valveof thelhydraulic system.

Figure v7 is a .detail. 'n vertical section .of the socketand associated .means .for receiving .and supporting the lower end of themast.

Figure 8 is asideelevational view showing the timber lift supporting a timberagainst the-root of them'ine.

Figure .9 is .a :diagrammatic view showing how the lift can .be used in handling timbers on an adjacent .car or vehicle.

Figure .10 .is :.a. side .view of .a timber-supporting lbracket I that may be used 'on the adjacent :car :or vehicle.

.In.the drawings we .have illustrated our Iiftdevice generally by the numeral'IO. It..is removably mounted on a mine car,=or vehicle of the usual type which is indicated by the numeral 11 .in Figures 1 and (2. 'The mine car is preferably provided with wells 12 (Figure 2.) at diagonally opposed ,points for receiving the lower .endof the vertical'mast 13 of, our lift. The wells 12 are disposed in openings in the car floor '14 :and extend downwardly therethroughj'but preferably'do not'extend to a l'evel below the axles 15 of the car wheels. The trust 13 ='is inserted from above' the-car fl'oor 14in a well 12 *and is -rotatable assignors to RugerEqu'ipment, Inc.,

therein until the handles .16 are usedto apply a brake, as

-will'later appear, to nonrotatably'clarnp the mastin the socket.

The mast 13 maybesuitably formed, for example, of

telescoping tubular sections which are Welded together.

To theupper end-oftthe mast 13 a. .cantilever-.boom -arm 1-7 has its-inner end pivoted at the fulcrum ,point 18 so that the arm canrswing =in-a vertical plane. Angular-1y disposedbetween the-arm 17. and the. mast-Bis a fluid-ram 19 provided forswingingthe arm 17 vertically. This ram includes the cylinder 20 pivoted to the :lower end .of .the

:mast .13 :at. 21-and the piston :and rod 22 which hasits upperendpivoted-to .the arm 17 at-a point'2-3 spaced outwardly from the fulcrum .18.

The outer end of the .boom .arm .17 carries .a timber engaging head 24. This head .24 is .in the .form of .a

cradle or yoke 25 which :receives and supports .a timber.

The cradle '25 (Figure 4) 'is mounted .for rotation through 360-degrees onthe upperendof a .bifurcatedlirik 26. Thislirik.26, alongwith alongitudinalbar27 and with the .arm 17 and'the upper portion .of the mast .13, .form parallel linkage .forkeeping thecradle .2'5 upright,.r egardless .ofthe vertical position of thezarm 17.

Thelink T26 is pivoted belowits upper end to the arm 17. atxa point 28 spaced slightlyfrom the outer end of such arm. The .bar .27 .has its .inner end pivoted to the vmast 13 at .29 slightly below its upper end and its outerendis adjustably pivotally. connected to the .lower end. of .the.li1ik 26. It will be noted fromFigure 4 that the .outer endzof the arm 17 extends through the bifurcated link '26 and the "lowerend of this bifurcatedllink'has. ablock 30 (Figure 3,) pivoted therein for swinging movement in ;a vertical plane. The bar 27 is provided on its outer end iwitha threaded rod portion which extends loosely forwardly throughan openingin the ,block'30'and which -carriesvtwo adjusting nuts 31.0n its outer end aheadtof and behind theblock. 'O.bviously,.the nuts 31 can be .usedto initially adjust thelink 26 into vertical position.

The extreme outer end of the arm.17 is alsolbifurcated and has a block '32 (Figure 4) pivoted therein .forswinging movement in a verticalplane. This block'32 receives the vertical stem of a-clevis 33 which carries .a hook'34 that is pivoted for swingingiinavertical plane.

The ram"19, -preferably a hydraulic ram,.is actuated by means of a double-acting hand-pump 35 Whichis carried by'the-lowerportion of the mast 13. The hydraulic tubing betweenthe ram 19 and the pump includes flexible ..sectionszto permit the necessary verticalswinging movement Of'ithe ram relative to the mast. The hydraulic systemfis shown diagrammatically in Figure 5 and includes the pressure line 36 which runs from the ,pump 35 'to the lower end of the cylinder 20. This pressurelineflfi .has connected to it a line in which a control and pressurerelease valve 37 is connected. This valve 37 may .be of the type shown in Figure 6 or of any other suitable type. It includes acontrol knob 38 by means of which it may be actuated manually to control lowering of the boom .arm 17. The valve.37 is preferably supported on the mast 113.

.The valveof Figure 6 includes a housing 40 whichjhas :a pressure inletgpassage "41 connected to the pressureline 3.6 (Figured) and an exhaust or drain outletpassage 42 which is 'conncctedito'the exhaust line 43 (Figure 5) that drains into the sump 44. The inlet passage 41 is formed coaxially witha bore 45 extendinglthrough the housing 40 and which has a needle valve 46 disposed therein. 'The point of needle is associated with areduced neck 47 of the bore 45 and the body of this needle is threaded at 48.intor.the end. of the housing. .By rotating the knob 38 on the needle, the point thereof .can be seated orunseated from the inner end'of theneck portion-47. It will .be apparent that the inlet passage 41 is at oneside of this .neckportion 47 and the exhaust passage 42 isat the other side of-this neck portion .so that the point of the needle will control communication therebetween. The inlet passage 45 has apressure-release passage 49 leading therefrom to a pressure-release valve 50 mounted on the housing ll). This'pressure-relief valve has a ball 51 normallyseated on the outer end of passage 49 by means of aspring 52. The resistance to unseatin'g of the'va'lve, or in otherwords the pressure at which the relief valve 50'funct'ions, can"b'e varied by adjustment of the nut 53 threaded into the to lift the timber T in position against the mine roof.

The timber T will be cradled in the cradle 25, the prongs of the cradle terminating well below the upper surface of the supported timber so they will not contact the mine roof. The arm 17 will be moved to this position by actuating ram 19 by pumping hand pump 35. The timber T will be pressed against the mine roof with sufficient pressure until it is shored in place. However, excessive pressure, tending to cave the roof, cannot be applied because of the setting of the spring 52 of the relief or overload valve 50. When the pressure in the hydraulic system becomes great enough to overcome the resistance of the spring 52 in the by-pass or pressure relief valve 50, the ball check 51 is forced away from its seat, allowing the oil to by-pass through an orifice 49a to the other side ofthe neck 47 and thereby to the low pressure side of the hydraulic system, the orifice 49a being connected thereto by a suitable line if desired. The load at the end of the cantilever arm 17 will lower slightly, upon unseating of the ball check 51, but will stabilize at the point that the resistance of the spring 52, in the pressure overload valve 50, overcomes the pressure in the hydraulic system. At this point, the ball check 51 is reseated cutting oflf the flow of fluid from the high pressure side to the low pressure side of the system. When the arm 17 is extended upwardly as shown in Figure 8, the cradle can be rotated to any desired position through 360 degrees without interference with the arm. When it is desired to lower arm 17, the knob 38 is turned to unseat the needle valve and connect inlet passage to outlet passage 42. By adjusting the needle, the operator can definitely control the lowering speed of the boom arm 17.

In Figure 7 I have illustrated the structure of each well 12 and the associated bearing structure for the mast 13. This well structure will receive the mast 13 from the top side of the car and will support it for rotation through 360 degrees, being provided with braking means for holding the mast in any selected position to which it is rotated.

Each well 12 comprises a sleeve or housing 55 which is open at its top and closed at its bottom but is provided with a drain plug 56 in its bottom. The housing 55 is supported by means of a plate or flange 57 which r is welded to the upper end thereof and which is of square outline. This plate or flange 57 rests on the horizontal portion 58 of an L-shaped supporting bracket which also includes the vertical portions 59. These portions 59 are suitably secured to the frame structure of the car or other vehicle. Braces 60 are also provided which run diagonally from'the horizontal portions 58 and which are provided 'with horizontally disposed block portions 61 at their lower 'ends that are welded to the vertical portions 59 of the brackets and to the housing 55 (Figures 1 and 3). The supporting bracket portions 59 are so secured to the car frame that the housing 55 will be coaxial with the open-v ing 62 provided in the floor '14 of the car with the flange or plate 57 engaging the lower surface to the floor around the opening. The lower end of the housing 55 is provided with a bushing 63 which is adapted to take the lateral or radial thrust of the lower end of the mast, as will later appear. This structure comprises the well 12, one of which is positioned at each corner of the car as shown in Figure 2 and remains in position therein for receiving the lower end of the mast 13.

' 'In positioning the mast in either well 12, the lower end is merely inserted in the housing 55 with its extreme lower end disposed in the bushing 63. The lower extremity of the mast, however, will not contact with the bottom of the housing 55, since the mast 13 is supported at the upper end of the housing 55 by a roller bearing. The mast 13 is provided with a cone-shaped bearing member 64 welded thereto and resting on the angularly disposed rollers 65. These rollers 65 are carried in an outer bearing race 66 which is attached to a brake pressure plate 67. This plate 67 is provided with an integral flange 68 of square outline that overlaps the floor 14 around the opening 62 and is bolted to the flange or plate 57 beneath the. floor by means of the vertical bolts 68 which pass downwardly through the opening 62. At diametrically the valve 50. When'the presopposed points bolts 70 are provided which extend loosely through the plate 67 and are anchored at their lower ends to the plate 57. These bolts serve as parts of toggles'for pressing the braking plate 67 downwardly and also serve to prevent rotation of thisplate. Each bolt 70 has a cam member 71 on its upper end which can be rotated by means of a handle 72 mounted for transverse sliding movement therein. This cam member has a lower end so shaped that when it is rotated, it will engage the upper surface of the plate 67 with increasing pressure to cause the plate 69 to firmly engage the upper surface of the cone portion 64 of the mast. Thus, the plate 67 will be pressed downwardly at diametrically opposed points and the mast 13 will be held in any selected position to which it is rotated. When the brake is actuated the entire bearing unit including plate 67 and race 66 will be moved downwardly to prevent excessive pressure on rollers 65.

To position the mast 13 in the housing 55 it is merely necessary to insert its lower end therein and connect the bolts 63 and 70 to the plate 57. To remove the mast it is merely necessary to remove the bolts 68 and 70. The bearing unit and the braking plate 67 will always be carried by the mast 13.

The swivel hook 34 may be used when the boom is to pull shoring timber stumps from the mine floor or in handling the timbers, especially preparatory to positioning in the cradle 25. For example, as shown in Figure 9, the swivel hook 34 and a cable or chain 75 may be used for lifting the timbers T from the ground, the car 11 on which the lift is mounted, or from an adjacent car 76. The car may be provided with brackets 77 supported on the upper ends of stakes 78. These brackets as shown in Figure 10 are U-shaped for receiving and supporting the timbers. The arm 17 can be used to swing the cradle 25 beneath the timber supported in brackets 77, the cradle then being rotated properly to be directly below the timber, at which time the arm 17 can be raised again to cause the timber to be cradled in the cradle 25.

The cradle 25 is removable from the upper end of the link 26 to permit the lift as a whole to be used outside the mine for general lifting or loading timbers on mine cars preparatory to entering the mine, by means of a chain or sling suspended by swivel hook 34.

It will be apparent that our device is very simple and can be removed from and repositioned on the mine car with ease. The device can handle the timbers efficiently and especially in positioning and holding them against the mine roof. The application of excessive pressure, however, to the roof will be precluded.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim is:

1. A timber lift device for use in placing timbers in a mine tunnel or the like against the roof thereof comprising a vertical mast member, a boom arm having its inner end pivoted to the mast member so that the arm member is mounted for vertical swinging movement, means for supporting the timber on the outer portion of the arm member, a fluid ram for swinging the arm upwardly to lift the timber against the roof, said ram being disposed between the mast member and the arm member and being pivotally connected to such members, a fluid pump for supplying fluid to said ram to swing the arm upwardly relative to the mast and connected to the ram by a pressure line, means for limiting the upward lifting force exerted by said ram to prevent the application of excessive forces to the mine roof by a timber carried by said supporting means on the arm member, said last-named means comprising an automatic pressure-release valve connected to the pressure line, and a manual control valve also connected to the pressure line for relieving the pressure when desired to lower the boom arm.

' 2. A timber lift device for use in placing timbers in a mine tunnel or the like and especially the roof thereof comprising a boom arm mounted for vertical swinging on a supporting post, means for supporting the timber transversely on the outer end of the arm, a fluid ram for swinging the arm upwardly to lift the timber against the roof, means for limiting the upward lifting force exerted by said ram, said means for supporting the timber comprising a timber-receiving cradle mounted on the outer portion of the arm for rotation through 360, parallel linkage connected to the arm and to the cradle" for keeping the cradle upright regardless of the vertical position of the arm, said parallel linkage comprising a longitudinally extending bar which is pivotally connected at its. inn rend to pp g post and, extendsparaby lel to the arm, a link pivotally connected to the outer end of said bar and to the outer end of said arm, said link extending above the arm and rotatably carrying said cradle, said link being bifurcated and the arm projecting therethrough, said bar being connected to said link by a block pivoted in said link, said bar having a threaded portion extending through said block, and an adjusting nut on said bar ahead of said block.

3. A timber lift according to claim 2 in which the projecting end of said arm has a hook swiveled thereto.

4. A timber lift according to claim 3 wherein the cradle comprises sets of prongs which receive and retain the timber, the prongs terminating below the upper surface of the timber.

5. In combination with a lift device having a vertical mast and a boom arm mounted thereon for vertical swinging movement, a supporting base having a socket for receiving the lower end of the mast, said lower end of the mast having a cone-shaped bearing portion, a roller bearing for supporting the mast in the socket, said roller bearing including angularly disposed rollers engaging said cone-shaped bearing portion, a brake at the upper end of the socket and including a plate disposed around said mast above said cone-shaped bearing portion having adjustable means for pressing it against said cone-shaped bearing portion to prevent rotation of said mast in said socket.

6. A timber lift device for use in placing timbers in a mine tunnel or the like against the roof thereof comprising a vertical mast member, a boom arm member having its inner end pivoted to the mast member so that the arm member is mounted for vertical swinging, means for supporting the timber transversely on the outer portion of the arm member and comprising a timber-receiving cradle mounted on the outer portion of the arm member for rotation through 360 degrees, a fluid ram for swinging the arm upwardly to lift the timber against the roof, said ram being disposed between the mast member and the arm member and being pivotally connected to such members, parallel linkage connected to the arm and the cradle for keeping the cradle upright regardless of the vertical position of the arm, said parallel linkage comprising a longitudinally extending bar which is pivotally connected at its inner end to the mast and extends parallel to the arm, and a link pivotally connected to the outer end of said bar and to the outer end of said arm, said link extending above the arm and rotatably carrying said cradle, a fluid pump for supplying fluid to said ram to swing the arm upwardly relative to the mast and connected to the ram by a pressure line, and means for limiting the upward lifting force exerted by said ram to prevent the application of excessive forces to the mine roof.

7. A timber lift device according to claim 6 wherein the bar isadjustably connected to said link.

8. A timber lift device for use in placing timbers in a mine tunnel or the like against the roof thereof comprising a vehicle having a socket, a vertical mast having its lower end rotatably mounted in said socket, said socket terminating approximately at the level of the wheel axes of the vehicle, adjustable means for non-rotatably holding the mast in the socket, a boom arm member having its inner end pivoted to the mast member so that the arm member is mounted for vertical swinging, means for supporting the timber transversely on the outer portion of the arm member and comprising a timber-receiving cradle mounted on the outer portion of the arm member for rotation through 360 degrees, a fluid ram for swinging the arm upwardly to lift the timber against the roof, said ram .being disposed between the mast member and the arm member and being pivotally connected to such members, parallel linkage connected to the arm and the cradle for keeping the cradle upright regardless of the vertical position of the arm, a fluid pump for supplying fluid to said ram to swing the arm upwardly relative to the mast and connected to the ram by a pressure line, and means for limiting the upward lifting force exerted by said ram to prevent the application of excessive forces to the mine roof.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,755,738 Klepadlo et a1 Apr. 22, 1930 2,408,387 Gay et al Oct. 1, 1946 2,517,813 Wallace, Jr Aug. 8, 1950 2,519,910 Kershaw Aug. 22, 1950" 2,570,383 Russell Oct. 9, 1951 2,597,086 Morrow May 20, 1952 2,603,373 McFarland et a1. July 15, 1952 2,643,515 Harsch June 30, 1953 OTHER REFERENCES Ser. No. 366,840, Obtresal (A. P. C.), published April 27, 1943.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1755738 *Sep 10, 1929Apr 22, 1930Alexander GratkowskiBeam-handling apparatus for coal-mining and other operations
US2408387 *Feb 1, 1945Oct 1, 1946Harry Samuel GayTimber setting machine
US2517813 *Aug 3, 1949Aug 8, 1950Cardinal CorpHoist
US2519910 *Sep 23, 1946Aug 22, 1950Royce KershawDerrick
US2570383 *Jun 18, 1948Oct 9, 1951Joy Mfg CoSafety control means for timber setting machines
US2597086 *May 10, 1947May 20, 1952Joy Mfg CoTimber setting machine
US2603373 *Mar 24, 1950Jul 15, 1952 Mine timber setting machine
US2643515 *Oct 17, 1950Jun 30, 1953Chester A HarschElectric control system for expansible motor operated boom
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3136534 *Oct 2, 1961Jun 9, 1964Howard William SMine tram
US3572514 *Aug 12, 1968Mar 30, 1971Sauber Charles JMethod and system for avoiding damage to derricks by preventing overload conditions
US3797675 *May 25, 1972Mar 19, 1974Moore JCrane
US4091934 *Apr 1, 1977May 30, 1978Ruger Equipment, Inc.Swivel mounted pump with integral valve means
US4260297 *Sep 26, 1978Apr 7, 1981Edbro LimitedMachines for positioning roof supports in a tunnel
US4784565 *Aug 31, 1987Nov 15, 1988Giroux D WilliamBeam picker
DE1195702B *Sep 12, 1959Jul 1, 1965Moll F W Soehne MaschinenfabAuf Fuehrungsschienenabschnitten verfahrbare Arbeitsbuehne fuer Arbeiten beim Auffahren von Grubenstrecken
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/743, 212/261
International ClassificationB66C13/18, B61D15/00, E21D17/02, E21D11/03
Cooperative ClassificationB61D15/00, E21D17/0206, E21D11/03, B66C13/18, B66C2700/065
European ClassificationB66C13/18, E21D17/02H, E21D11/03, B61D15/00