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Publication numberUS2701746 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 8, 1955
Filing dateJul 21, 1950
Priority dateJul 21, 1950
Publication numberUS 2701746 A, US 2701746A, US-A-2701746, US2701746 A, US2701746A
InventorsPiggott Morley W
Original AssigneePiggott Morley W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-service cold storage locker
US 2701746 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 8, 1955 M. W. PIGGOTT SELF-SERVICE COLD STORAGE LOCKER Filed July 21. 1950 El i fl Lilllllll'" MORLEY 4 Sheets-Sheet l W. PIGGOTT 3rmentor I attornegfi Feb. 8, 1955 M. w. PIGGOTT SELF-SERVICE COLD STORAGE LOCKER 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 21. .1950

\ MORLEY w. mega};

attorney FebQS, 1955 w, PIGGQTT 2,701,746

SELF-SERVICE COLD STORAGE LOCKER Filed July 21, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 PIGGOTT Zhwentor MORLEY W.

FIG-5 v Gttomegs Filed July 21. 1950 Feb. 8, 1955 w, PlGGOTT 2,701,746

SELF-SERVICE COLD STORAGE LOCKER 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 MORLEY}: w. PIGGOTT Z'mventor (Ittomegs Unite States Patent '0 SELF-SERVICE COLD STORAGE LOCKER Morley W. Piggott, Seattle, Wash.

Application July 21, 1950, Serial No. 175,075

4 Claims. (Cl. 312-215) This invention contemplates the provision of cold storage lockers that are normally used by the housewife for the storage of excess frozen foods. In lockers of this order this present invention contemplates a locker arrangement so made that it may be made in sections in the manufacturers plant and then easily moved in parts through existing doorways, and the like, and to be assembled in the final place of use which normally will be either in, or closely associated with, a retail food establishment. Provision is made so that, with the minimum of expensive structural elements, lockers will be made available to the vendor on a self-servicing basis and at the same time the provision is made so that the renter can have access only to his own locker which will be key controlled.

In the past few years there has been a tremendous increase in the use of cold storage lockers by individual families. They find it convenient to freeze and thus store products of their own time or garden, and it is also found economical to buy whole animals, or of the larger of these to buy one-half, which is cut and wrapped in useable packages and then stored away for future use. A person, viewing the field of locker arrangements as employed today, will be impressed with the wide range of constructions that are at present in use. This is a definite indication that the best plan for general use has not yet been determined. In the past the most effective efilcient system for cold storage lockers was to provide, in a single building, a large number of compartments, usually separated from each other by open-work framing, and to maintain the temperature of the entire large room at a necessarily very low freezing temperature. This provided great economy in over-all construction in that only the outer walls of the large room need be fully in-. sulated and the various individual lockers were without insulation. They proved, however, to be objectionable from many points of view. First of all, the person putting goods in their locker, or taking material out from the same, were subjected to the very low freezing temperatures for considerable periods. Many persons cannot accept these low temperatures without being adequately and necessarily heavily clothed. Then too, the storage lockers normally being in a building by themselves, required either additional parking facilities with the attendant extra stock by the users of the establishment, or the users must carry the cold frozen products to their car or point of collection of other foods. A preferred solution appears to be that of combining the frozen food locker with a store having either general groceries or possibly just meats, or preferably a combination of them, such as is commonly referred to as a Super- Market, and under such conditions to have the lockers readily available to the patron without the necessity of getting into a low temperature room. This type of equipment is normally referred to as warm room storage lockers.

This present invention comprehends an improved form of the warm room storage locker. Of the various warm room lockers observed in the past, they have generally been characterized by constructions that made it mandatory that they be largely assembled in the producing factory, and then transportation to the point of installation and the physical moving of the same into the point of use normally occasioned the removal of portions of the walls, or the like, so that the bulky units could be installed. In this present invention it is believed that this fault of many of the formsof existing equipment has been overcome, and a unit having a large number of lockers can be transported in small sections and readily fitted into a store room through the normal doors provided in the same.

A great many of the warm room lockers available at present may be likened to the home refrigerator, in that for a given cubical content a large amount of surrounding insulation material is required, and to give adequate access expensive insulated doors are required for a relatively small storage capacity. This general plan is a wide departure from the cold storage locker room where each individual storage space did not require its own insulation. The majority of the warm room lockers observed have made'it necessary to employ such a large amount of enclosing insulation and structure as to bring the cost per cubic foot of the warm room locker up to a level that prices the same out of general use. In this present invention it is believed that means are provided for overcoming the excessive expense per cubic foot of warm room storage lockers.

The principal object of this present invention, therefore, is to provide a warm room storage locker so constructed that the unit price per square foot of storage space can be greatly reduced so that it can compare favorably and economically with the large locker rooms wherein the uninsulated lockers are disposed in a cold room.

A further object of this invention is to provide means whereby the expensive access doors with their attendant fittings can be reduced to a minimum so that pricing or rentals of the finished units can be kept well within the range acceptable to the average family budget.

A further object of this invention is to provide a builtup bank of warm room storage lockers each piece of which is relatively small so that it can be easily handled, easily transported and easily entered in through the ordinary access doors in the building.

A further object of this invention is to provide that a single access door can be made to serve a large number of storage compartments to the end that the over-all cost will be kept to a minimum.

A further object of this invention is to provide means whereby, with a minimum of expense in structure, the individual locker renter will at all times have access to his locker but will be effectively denied access to any other lockers.

A further object of this invention is to provide a bat tery of food storage lockers which can be enclosed with the minimum of insulating material so that the over-all cost of the unit can, in many cases, be reduced below the cost of similar storage space in the warm room p an.

A further object of this invention provides a battery of frozen food lockers so arranged that the great bulk of the locker assembly can be placed in a room, such as a storage room adjoining a place of business, and have the access doors located within the grocery store or butcher shop and in this way use a very minimum of the organized existing floor space of the store yet give the customers and renters the convenience of selecting their frozen foods from their own locker at the same time they are purchasing the balance of food required for a periodic food supply.

Further objects, advantages and capabilities will be apparent from the description and disclosure in the drawings, or may be comprehended or are inherent in the device.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is an elevational view of an embodiment of my self-service cold storage locker, with a portion of the cabinet broken away revealingcompartments formed in the interior;

Figure 2 is a plan view as taken from above in Figure 1, a portion of the cabinet being broken away;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary perspective view of a sidewall unit positioned on a base unit, enlarged, with portions broken away revealing the inner construction of said units;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary View, enlarged and partly in section, showing the means of joining together two adjoining sidewall units;

arcane Figure 5 is a perspective view of members forming the base and track in my locker, inexploded form;

Figure 6 is a view taken on line 6--6 of Figure 2, partly in section;

Figure 7 is a perspective; view of food containers to be used in my locker;

Figure 8 is a schematic diagram of an electrical circuit and associated parts, which, upon selection of a locker compartment, rotates the shelvingiunit until said compartment in line with the appropriate door and release said door; and

Figure; 9: is an enlarged perspective View of: a portion of-the locker selection panel, cut to' show details of one key=operated selector;

Referring to Figures 1 and 2, cabinet I2 has the general form of an upright cylinder. The sides oi cabinet- 12, in this embodiment of my invention, are made in eight units, six sidewall units 14-bein'g identical and door unit 16 and: an outwardly exte ding cooling unit 118 being of thesame widthso that each unit covers one-eighth of; the sidesurface ot? cabinet 12. Three base units 20 form the bottom of cabinet- 12 and three cover units 22 form the top of cabinet 12} The outer base unitsand outer coverunits are identical and the center base unit and center cover unit are identical except that the center cover unit has a passageway for shaft 24/;

The interchangeability of the units of cabinet 12 is desirable tosimplify the' manufacture of the cabinet, this making, a greater number ofidentical partsfor mass productionof the same and-making] fewer kinds of units to assemble. Throughout the design of my locker I have employed relatively small units so that they may be, handled. with ease and moved through even'small doorways to alocation at which they are to be used; the units being adapted to rapid assembly at the location where they are to be used.

Typical construction oftheunits of cabinet 12 is shown fFigure 3; Sidewall unit 14ha's side members 26,; one having tongue 28 and the other' having groove 30'. Tongue 28 and groove 30-of' adjacent, side members 26 are. held" together as by'bolts 32",, havingjwashers 34 011 either side; as is' shown inEigure'. 4. Access to boltsi32 is obtained byopenings 36' in inner wall 37,. there being cover plates 38" for said openings. Uprights 40 are spaced between side members, 2 6: and stringers 42 tie the vertical: members together; Inner wall 37' and outer wall 414 are preferablymade. at, water-resistant plywood and secured to the adjacent members. Member 46 forms the, toplot sidewall unit 14 and member 48'forms the; bottom, Insulating material and; mpervious vapor seals are placed} in the hollow interior,,andfform-a-barrier to v transfer offbeat and moisture in, sidewall unit 1 except at the extreme, margin of the, unit and? at the crossing of uprights 40 and stringers 42 Where the low conductivity, of,wood must be depended upon; The'tongue and grooye joinder of. adjacent sidewall units 14 serves to hinder" transfer of heat, it being' preferable-to have sealingtmaterial' such as caulking at this'point.

Holes, as at 50, are uniformly spaced on-members 46 and 48 to secure sidewall, unit 14 to cover; units 22: and basennits 20. as. by, bolts 52, access to bolts 52 being obtainedthrough openings in sidewall. unitv 14 and base unit120. Said. openings are covered; by cover plates-54 secured as by screws. Base=units-20 and cover; units 22 have holes uniformly spaced corresponding to: holes 50. in sidewall units;14- so thatsa-id-units may. be combined in any manner, there beingvsii'nilar holes indoorunit-16. and cooling unit 18I8.- Battens59 at the joinder of; sidewall units 14' to cover units 22 and base units: 20 serve to cover the joint and assists in positioning theunits.

Base units20 have tongues 60 and grooves 62 intadjacent walls and are connected" together as by bolts 63. Ijoists= 66' space inner wall 64" and outer wall, 68 apart and thecavity is filledwith insulating material and vapor. barriers are provided.

Door unit- 161 has aplurality of doors 69, one door for each level" of compartments 70. compartment selectors; 72", one reeeach; compartment, are-- setin door unit 16, operation of said selector s72" being described in more detail later; Doors 69" are hing edly connected to door unit 56 and have locking-means on the other side operable remotely by compartment selectors 72? A plurality, of"

1 ,137,- Frgure 9 shows a section of the'door panel'lfihaving a series of key operated selectors 72A, each to be operated by a separate key; as- 73; The selectors 72A may have essentially the same mechanisms as the ordinary automobile ignition switch and each has a plurality of electrical leads for connection to the remainder of the electrical control system.

A most desirable feature of my self-service cold storage locker is having only one" banlt'of doors 69. Compartments 70 are serviced by rotation to a position in line with said doors. In any warm room locker much heat is lost around doors, yet many lockers previously constructed have had a dooffof each compartment. Also, a door is arelatively expensive, item; and involves complex insulations and sealing means. Little air can pass to other compartments when one door is open to its associated compartment, the walls of the compartment being quite close to doors 69, as can be seen from Figure 2. Suitable rubber flanges on the inside of the door openings further seat selected: compartment Being or the saiiie width as sidewall units 14; door unit 16 may be positioned ahy place around the Clifcumference oficabi-iiet" 12: It" maybe considered desirable i'n certain stores th'a t an oscabin'et 12, except door unit 16,. becQneeaIed: behind await, Again, it may be considered desirable only'that do'oi' unit 16 and cooling unit 18' be open to View in which case they may be po'sitioned side by side"; and the r'e's't of cabinet 12' covered;

Cooling unit 1 8;, fem-ring a cold air supply, has openings at theinner' top at 74 and at the inner bottom at 76 for passage of air to andfrom inside cabinet 12. A- blower 80 is'jpositioned the upperportion of cooling unit-1t? and=may b'e-o'f any eonve'nti'onal type and-powered by electricity. Door 82 affords access to blower 80; Refrigerant coils" 84* areposit'ioned below blower 80 and connected to a source of; refrigerant not depicted-.- Space is provided-for a quick freeze-area either above or below refrigerant coils 84, asat 8.6,- the're" being a door 88 aflordingaccess to this; area.- 7 Cooling unit 18 may be positioned at any point around the circumference of cabinet 1-2-.

A rotatable shelving unit, having a generally upright cylindrical outline, with a plurality of storage compartmoms-70;. is formed. by the" following: means. A. circular base 89 is; mounted; rollers 9l0which are set on circ'ulartracks 92i ireular tracks 92 are positioned on base units-20', there beingtwo stfch tracks depicted in Figuresriand, 6; onepnearthe' outer edge of compart ments 70- andl one spaced therefrom; In, this position: the Wt'aig v ttdf food: in compartments 70' isdirectly supported facilitate-rotation or base 88-;

I ShafhZ, thereto, byf'smtablemeans: asi'by havinga flanged sleeve 94 see on; the? end" of; shaft 24* and having bolts" or screws passing; ugh the flange and base 82-2 A. second flanged sleeve" 9,6?"isi, rIotatably riountcd on shaft" 24" and secured toitheinner: side'ofgthe central cover unit 22. Shaft 24 carries: a bevel gear- 98 at: its. upper end; and" an electric motor 19,03 is, positioned: on cover" unit 22 at. one side, there bein a b'evelj gear 102' on the; motor. shaft connectingwith b vet gear 98; Shaft 24 sh'ould" either be made ormaterialihaving'; a' low conductivity factor or suitable couplings should be, provided :topreve'nt the'conductin'g' of heatifithe'shaft; Upongactivationof electric motor shaft" 24% rotates and compartments. 70 are moved; A cover. 1'03fin'1a'y be used? to protect these. parts and con- 10.4 are, positione on; base 89. p s r-mew on" Brackets 1'08? of a" general 'pe horizontally. Between partitions. 1'04, forming colmpa'rtm'cnts'flfl. shelves-.105 are 'ciutfofi attheir apex to permit? circulation of air at the, center of compartments 70. It is desirablelt'ojhave some form of container for mat'erialto' be" st'o'redin compartments 70; In Figure 7' is. depicted a setof threerwire. baskets offa size and shape together;-to"fi t' iri; compartment 70. The. baskets ll'tlfatfordimeans ofs egatiiiglmaterialiin compartments deachwilhnot 1e veryheavyz'. A. lip l-l2onrthe 'f'shel 106. provides: means to prevent v fr m'c'drti'ifig-O ofcompartmentsm durin rotation; nil, gjing. a'g st 'sidj'ewall'funits 14.

It can; be? seen" that, the, c mpannrents 70' are arranged iir vertical"and'horiiontalirows; therebeing a door 69 for each horizontal roWand-ith compartments being rotate permitting; any (critical? rowto be positiohcfi if) Iine said" Now will be described the means whereby a customer may select his compartment, this being the self-service feature of my invention. The customers compartment may be at any location and means must be provided by which the compartments 70 are rotated until the customers compartment is lined up with doors 69 and the door 69 corresponding to said compartment released. At the same time, the customer must not be able to obtain access to any other compartment. I

' There is a compartment selector 72 for eachcompartment, as recited before. These selectors 72 should be in the form of locks with separate keys for each, as it is desirable that a customer only be able to operate one selector. Simple push-button selectors could be utilized if the storage locker is to be operated by an employee.

Referring to Figure 8, a schematic diagram of an electrical circuit and associated parts to be activated by said selectors 72 is depicted. This is a simplified example in that only eight compartments, with corresponding switches 1A; 1B; 1C;'1D; 2A; 2B; 2C; and 2D, are involved, four being compartments on a level with door and solenoid 114A and four on a level with door and solenoid 114B.

A solenoid 114A, 114B is associated with each door to release the associated door upon selection of a compartment on that level. A double-pole, single-pull switch is associated with each compartment selector 72, to be closed upon operation of the associated selector 72.

Taking the example that the compartment corresponding to switch 1A is selected, as by inserting a key in the associated selector, this double-pole switch 1A is closed. Current from the source of electricity at 118, 110 or 220 volt A. C., is free to pass through line 120, past switches 121 which are only open when the doors are open, through motor 122, through the cam-operated switch 124 associated with the vertical tier of compartments in which the selected compartment is located, through line 126, through double-pole switch 1A, back to the source at 118.

In passing through motor 122, the same is activated and rotates. Motor 122 carries a gear 127 engaged with a gear 129 fixedly positioned on shaft 24, and said shaft is rotated moving compartments 70. Also fixedly mounted on shaft 24 is cam 128 which operates cam-operated switches 124 as it passes.

As shaft 24 is rotated, cam 128 reaches the cam-operated switch 124 associated with the tier of compartments in which the selected compartment is located. Switch 124 is normally held in an inward position by spring means; but, upon cam 128 moving the same outward, switch 124 makes contact with line 130. Current is no longer free to pass through motor 122; and cam 128 maintains its position, the motor having an automatic elgctric brake which acts when power to the motor is cut Current now passes from the source at 118, past the double-pole switch 1A, through line 132, past solenoid 114A, through line 130, past cam-operated switch 124, through line 126, past double-pole switch 1A, back to the source at 118. The associated door is released when the current passes through solenoid 114A and solenoid 114A also opens one of the switches 121. The purpose of the switch at 121 is to prevent the selection mechanism being activated by the insertion of another key in a compartment selector 72 while one of the doors is open, and perhaps injuring a customer who has his arm in his compartment. The selected compartment being in line with the doors and solenoid 114A releasing the door on the correct level, the customer now has access to his compartment.

The cam 128, gear 129, motor and cam-operated switches are enclosed in a housing positioned on cover unit 22, indicated at 134 in Figure 6.

As can be seen, I have provided a thoroughly automatic self-servicing selector system, whereby the operator may have access to only the compartment to which he has the key. A minimum of expensive door construction is involved in my locker and the cabinet is very well insulated except in the door area. The temperature of other compartments is little affected by the servicing of one compartment. This has been provided in a warm room locker fabricated from easily portable small units. The locker is suitable for use in various commercial establishments without providing additional facilities to house cold storage lockers and does not require employee supervision. The locker is relatively economical of construction and maintenance and presents an attractive appearance. A minimum of floor area is occupied by the locker.

Having thus described my self-service cold storage locker, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications may be made without departing from the scope of my invention, and it is my intention to claim all structures within the proper scope of my invention.

I claim:

1. In a self-service cold storage locker of the type having a cabinet and a shelving unit positioned in the cabinet to rotate about a vertical axis, the shelving unit being divided horizontally and vertically into rows of wedgeshaped storage compartments, the improvement, comprising: the sidewalls of said cabinet being formed by a series of separable sidewall units of equal width which join one another on vertical lines, several of said sidewall units being identical, one sidewall unit forming a door unit having a separate door for each layer of storage compartments, independent latching means on each door, an electric motor and means connecting said motor to said shelving unit to rotate the same, an electrical control system having a selector corresponding to each storage compartment, said control system being connected to said latching means and to said motor and being operative to rotate said shelving unit upon selection of a compartment by its selector until the selected compartment is aligned with its door and unlatching only the door of the layer in which the selected compartment is located, whereby access is afforded to but the single compartment selected by its associated selector, and a switch, operated by each door, in said control system operative to inactivate said motor when said doors are open.

2. In a self-service cold storage locker of the type having a cabinet and a shelving unit positioned in the cab inet to rotate about a vertical axis, the shelving unit being divided horizontally and vertically into rows of wedge-shaped storage compartments, the improvement, comprising: the sidewalls of said cabinet being formed by at least six separable sidewall units of equal width which join one another on vertical lines and extend from top to bottom of the cabinet, said sidewall units being identical except for one forming a door unit and one forming a cooling unit having an outer extension con taining a source of cold air, said door unit having a separate door for each layer of storage compartments, independent latching means on each door, said cabinet having a floor formed by a series of separable chordal floor units, said cabinet having a ceiling formed by a series of separable chordal ceiling units, an electric motor and means connecting said motor to said shelving unit to rotate the same, an electrical control system having a key-operated selector corresponding to each storage compartment, said control system being connected to said latching means and to said motor and being operative to rotate said shelving unit upon selection of a compartment by its selector until the selected compartment is aligned with its door and unlatching only the door of the layer in which the selected compartment is located, whereby access is afforded to but the single compartment selected by its associated selector.

3. In a self-service cold storage locker of the type having a cabinet and a shelving unit positioned in the cabinet to rotate about a vertical axis, the shelving unit being divided horizontally and vertically into rows of wedge-shaped storage compartments, the improvement, comprising: the sidewalls of said cabinet including a vertical row of doors including a separate door for each layer of storage compartments, independent latching means on each door, an electric motor and means connecting said motor to said shelving unit to rotate the same, and an electrical control system for said locker having a selector corresponding to each storage compartment, said control system being connected to said latching means and to said motor and being operative to rotate said shelving unit upon selection of a compartment by its selector until the selected compartment is aligned with its door and unlatching only the door of the layer in which the selected compartment is located, whereby access is afforded to but the single compartment selected by its associated selector.

4. In a self-service cold storage locker of the type having a cabinet and a shelving unit positioned in the cabinet to rotate about a vertical axis, the shelving unit be- QW IEWQ shapecfsmrag eompanmentathe-Bripmvement; com mis.- M "Z'TT mg; the' sidewalls of said cabinet; includin gaa semfiate PATEBIIQ door for eadh layer of storage. compartments, independent; 112164 1, Ma a; Tune 20,- 1816,-

latching; means-0n each doom; an ,eleafiri"e motor and 5?; 1,489,431} l gand-1n means connecting said-mot on to said shelving-unit to ray 25195; 0801 Ryfiflldaon Apr. ,2; i940" tate the same, andram electric; controlv system for said Z ZOLAR- May 21', 1 940 locker having a key-operated selector corresponding to zfili flfifiil B'Hird Qct; 1940 each storage compartment, said control system being-con- 2,245,300 Ruttan' June 10; 19 41; nested tosaid latehing meansand-tasaid-motor and be- 10? 2 21-9 558; Elem: Apr. 14,, 1-942 ing-operat'ive to-rofiate said-"shelving -unit up nselection 233 g Mullen Sept.- 12; B944" of a compartmenh byiits selector anti-L- the seleetedcor'n- 2,4 6.2 1-);braharnson:- Mar. 25,, 1942' partmenfis alignedwithgitszdoor and-unlatching only- 2-,484;,894 Lindsay: a.. Oct: 18';- 1-949 door of the layez in whichjhewelected compartment;

1ocated,-,whereby aecesslis aflolide'dr to but tkie single em- 16 partment selected by its associateetselector.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2847265 *Oct 21, 1954Aug 12, 1958Kulik Sigmund ASelf checking hat and coat locker
US2954684 *Apr 10, 1958Oct 4, 1960Harold StillmanStorage cabinet
US2967081 *Sep 19, 1957Jan 3, 1961Philips CorpArticle-storing closet
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US3052508 *Nov 25, 1960Sep 4, 1962Viola Ind IncFreezer cabinet locker unit
US3769805 *Apr 24, 1972Nov 6, 1973Melbro CorpRevolving display capsule
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US4632022 *Feb 25, 1985Dec 30, 1986St. Charles Manufacturing Co.Fume hood fabricated from modules and having laterally extending exhaust ports
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US5832692 *Mar 25, 1996Nov 10, 1998Bush Industries, Inc.Panel construction and method for manufacturing
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US6302786 *Feb 29, 2000Oct 16, 2001Case Systems, Inc.Vented cabinet
US7676299 *Aug 7, 2007Mar 9, 2010Talyst Inc.Apparatus for tracking and dispensing refrigerated medications
US20080029601 *Aug 7, 2007Feb 7, 2008Talyst Inc.Apparatus for tracking and dispensing refrigerated medications
Classifications
U.S. Classification312/215, 62/381, 312/257.1, 312/305
International ClassificationF25D13/02, F25D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25D13/02
European ClassificationF25D13/02