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Publication numberUS2702439 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 22, 1955
Filing dateMar 28, 1950
Priority dateMar 28, 1950
Publication numberUS 2702439 A, US 2702439A, US-A-2702439, US2702439 A, US2702439A
InventorsWallin Swensson Karl Hugo
Original AssigneeWallin Swensson Karl Hugo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Perpetual calendar
US 2702439 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1955 K. H. w. SWENSSON 2,702,439

PERPETUAL CALENDAR Filed March 28. 1950 EMA/PM/VUM! FEB. sum I dl/ME 1 MM PM 77/55 JAM we Jl/LY' WED.

; oar fdA/V. T902 MAY m1. F55. 3 Am. I SAZ. f 9 /0 /Z INVENTOR United States Patent PERPETUAL CALENDAR Karl Hugo Wallin Swensson, Halmstad, Sweden Application March 28, 1950, Serial No. 152,440

1 Claim. (Cl. 40108) This invention relates to perpetual calendars, and more particularly it relates to a calendar, which may be adapted to a penholder, a pencil or other cylindrical or polygonal device.

The object of the invention is to provide a calendar, which is easy to manufacture, easy to read-only the necessary indications being visible by reading-whlch eliminates the difiiculties by the leap years and which may be housed in an outer tube, for instance in a pencil case.

In accordance with the invention I provide an outer tube, having two inner coaxial tubes, rotatably mounted therein and bearing indications for ordinary years, leap years, months, Week days and month days, whereby the outer tube is provided with slots, through which the years and the months may be observed with one space at a time and a transparent portion, through which the week days and the month days may be observed in several lines. According to another embodiment of the invention I pro vide an outer tube, housing two inner coaxial tubes, rotatably mounted therein and bearing indications for ordinary years, leap years and months, whereby the outer tube is provided with slots, through which the years and the months may be observed with one space at a time and whereby the inner tubes are connected to knobs, projecting outside the outer tube and bearing the week day and month day indications.

In the drawing Fig. l is a side view, showing the calendar in combination with a pencil.

Fig. 2 is a section through the calendar-pen, showing a part of the pencil in side elevation.

Fig. 3 is a detail, perspective view, showing the outer tube of the calendar.

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the inner tubes and Fig. 5 is a section through a second embodiment of the invention.

The calendar comprises in particular three parts, the inner tubes 1 and 2 and the outer tube 3.

The outer tube 3 is provided with a central, transparent portion 8, extending all around the same and two pairs of mutually linear observation slots 4, 5 for leap years and 6, 7 for ordinary years. The slots 4, 5 are circumferentially spaced from and axially displaced relative to the slots 6, 7. See in particular Fig. 3.

The inner tube 1 is provided with the indications 9, and 11 for months and 12 for Week days and is connected to the knob 16 via a tube 17. The inner tube 1 is rotatably mounted within the outer tube 3 in such a manner that when the knob 16 is turned, the month indications 9 and 10 are exposed, with one space at a time, through the slot 4, while the month indications 10 and 11 are exposed, with one space at a time, through the slot 6. The Week days 12 are visible through the central, transparent portion 8 of the outer tube 3.

The inner tube 2 bears the indications for month days 13 and for ordinary years 14 respectively for leap years 15 and is connected to the knob 18. The inner tube 2 is rotatably mounted within the outer tube in such a manner that when the knob 18 is turned the ordinary years 14 are exposed, with one space at a time, through the slot 7, while the leap years 15 are exposed, with one space at a time, through the slot 5. The month days 13 are exposed through the central, transparent portion 8 of the outer tube 3.

The member 19 prevents the inner tubes from axial 'ice movement and is secured to the outer tube. It holds the pen-clip 20 in position.

In Fig. 4 the table 14 comprises ordinary years, equivalent years brought together in lines, the table 15 comprises leap years, the tables 9 and 10 comprise together months corresponding to leap years, equivalent months brought together in lines, and the tables 10 and 11 comprise together months corresponding to ordinary years, equivalent months brought together in lines. The tables 12 and 13 comprise as aforesaid week days respectively month days.

The mode of using the calendar is as follows:

If it be desired for instance, to determine on what day of the week November 5, 1950 will fall, the knob 18 is turned until the year /19-/50 is exposed through the slot 7 and the knob 16 turned until the month November appears in the slot 6, whence it will be apparent, as the word Sunday registers with the month day 5. All the remaining month days in November will then stand at the proper week days and could be read through the central, transparent portion of the outer tube.

If it be desired to determine on what day of the week September 9, 1952 will fall, the same procedure will be used. The year /19/52 does not appear in the slot 7, which indicates that this year is a leap year. The knob 18 is turned until the year 52 appears in the observation-slot 5 and the knob 16 turned until the month September is exposed in the slot 4. September 9, 1952 =Tuesday.

No mistakes are possible as the leap years never appear in the slot 7.

The outer tube of the calendar, shown in Figs. l-3 is W preferably manufactured in a transparent, plastic material, colored inside at the parts being not transparent, but the calendar according to the invention may be formed out in for example metal as shown by Fig. 5.

The inner tube 21, which carries the indications for ordinary years 14 and for leap years 15, is via a not designated tube, connected to the knob 28, hearing the month days 13. This inner tube is rotatably mounted within the outer tube 23, which is provided with two pairs of mutually linear slots, 24 and 25 for leap years and 26, 27 for ordinary years, in such a manner that the ordinary years 14 appear, with one space at a time, through the slot 27 and the leap years 15, with one space at a time, through the slot 25 when the knob 28 is turned. The observation-slots may preferably be stamped out of the outer tube.

The inner tube 22, which carries the indications for the months 9, 10 and 11, is connected to the knob 29, bearing the week days 12. This inner tube is rotatably mounted within the outer tube 23 in such a manner that the months corresponding to ordinary years 10, 11 appear, with one space at a time, through the slot 26 while the months corresponding to leap years 9, 10 are visible, with one space at a time, through the slot 24 when the knob 29 is turned.

The mode of using the calendar is the same as described above. The knobs 28 and 29 thus will indicate the Week days and the month days.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

A perpetual calendar for a pencil case, comprising in combination an outer tube, two co-axial inner tubes having the same outer diameters and being rotatably arranged within said outer tube, and means secured to both of said inner tubes and projecting outside said outer tube for rotating said inner tubes relative to one another and relative said outer tube, said outer tube being provided with two pairs of mutually linear slots and a transparent central portion, extending all around said tube, the slots of each pair being axially spaced from each other and the slots of one pair being circumferentially spaced from and axially displaced relative the slots of the other pair, said transparent central portion being located between the two right and the two left slots of the outer tube, seen in its length direction, one of said inner tubes bearing in seven axial spaces around its periphery monthly indications arranged in several rows as well as the week day indications in their consecutive order, one in each space, while the other inner tube bears in seven spaces around its periphery year indications in several rows with the leap year indications separated axially from the ordinary year indications as well as the month day indications in their consecutive order arranged in several rows, the slots of said outer tube being so dimensioned and located relative to all said indications that the monthly indications and the year indications of ordinary years Will appear, with one space at a time, through one pair of mutually linear slots and the monthly indications and the year indications of leap years will appear, with one space at a time, through the other pair 5 tube.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Hochhcimer June 7, 1892 Draughon Dec. 18, 1928 Halperin et a1 Oct. 20, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US476461 *Apr 5, 1892Jun 7, 1892 Calendar
US1695539 *Aug 11, 1923Dec 18, 1928Draughon William HCalendar
US2299698 *Feb 12, 1941Oct 20, 1942JedwabnikCalendar for pencil cases
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2767496 *Mar 16, 1955Oct 23, 1956Arnold KeseCalendar
US2821036 *Jun 15, 1954Jan 28, 1958Liguori Alfred TIndicia bearing writing implement
US3785076 *Nov 5, 1971Jan 15, 1974Swensson WAdjusting mechanism for perpetual calendars
US6612766Dec 7, 2001Sep 2, 2003Mark G. CollinsWriting instrument
US6742953May 20, 2002Jun 1, 2004Bic CorporationWriting instrument with display window
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/335, 401/195
International ClassificationB43K29/00, B43K29/087
Cooperative ClassificationB43K29/0875
European ClassificationB43K29/087C