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Publication numberUS2702663 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 22, 1955
Filing dateApr 16, 1952
Priority dateApr 16, 1952
Publication numberUS 2702663 A, US 2702663A, US-A-2702663, US2702663 A, US2702663A
InventorsStanley J Klein
Original AssigneeEmpire Box Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nested carton blank
US 2702663 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 22, 1955 s. J. KLEIN NESTED CARTON BLANK 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 16, 1.952

INVENTOR. ire/may JAZE/n Feb. 22, 1955 5. J. KLElN NESTED CARTON BLANK 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 16, 1952 INVENTOR. J'rwmsy 1645/ Feb. 22, 1955 s. J. KLEIN 2,702,663

NESTED CARTON BLANK Filed April 16, 1952 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN VEN TOR. Jrm AE [as/4 United States Patent NESTED CARTON BLANK Stanley J. Klein, Englewood, N. J., assignor to Empire Box Corporation, Garfield, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application April 16, 1952, Serial No. 282,526

1 Claim. (Cl. 229-31) My present invention relates to double walled cartons and more particularly to novel double walled cartons particularly adapted to nesting.

Heretofore in the prior art double walled cartons have been made of highly flexible cardboard which of necessity must have its walls strengthened. The strengthening of the walls is obtained by doubling over the material so that each wall is essentially double the thickness of the blank, while the bottom is of single thickness. The resulting structure is fairly rigid and strong.

In the manufacture of the blanks, a continuous strip of flexible cardboard is utilized which is cut into the plurality of blanks by means of dies. This procedure of cutting from a long continuous piece of flexible material presents a great deal of wastage. The wastage occurs due to the spaces on the flexible cardboard material between the various blanks. It is evident that the smaller the spaces between the blanks the less wastage there is in the manufacturing processes and the cheaper is each unit blank. In considering the reduction of these wastage areas, it is important not to reduce the size of the blank in such a manner as to decrease the strength of the resulting erected carton. The double walls, therefore, must be retained.

This double problem of presenting a carton having double wall strength and having a minimum of wastage material has heretofore presented great difiiculties.

My present invention overcomes the difiiculties in the prior art by providing a pair of nested carton blanks wherein outer panels of opposite walls of the carton are saw-toothed to facilitate nesting. The toothed arrangement permits the blanks to nest so that when the blanks are cut, a single die element at one line will separate :the two blanks at their adjoining edges without waste.

To provide the nesting of rows as well as the individual blanks in a single row, my present invention provides a double walled carton having one panel of one side wall saw-toothed with a plurality of teeth and one panel of the opposite side wall saw-toothed also with a plurality of teeth adapted to intermesh.

It is then a primary object of the present invention to provide a novel double walled carton, the blank of which is capable of being nesfed.

Still another important object of the present invention is the provision of two different double walled cartons, the blanks of which are sequentially nested.

Another important object of the present invention is the provision of a novel double walled carton, the manufacture of which causes a minimum of wastage.

Further objects and advantages will become apparent in considering the following description taken in conjunction with the figures wherein:

Figure l is a view in perspective of the novel double walled carton of the present invention.

Figure 2 is a view in perspective of another of my novel double walled cartons of my present invention.

Figure 3 is a view in perspective of a novel double walled carton partially opened.

Figure 4 is a top view of my double Walled carton partially folded.

Figure 5 is a top view of my novel double walled carton folded one step further.

Figure 6 is a plan view of a row of nested blanks of my novel double walled carton.

Referring now to Figure 1, the novel, nested carton 10 is shown having the side walls 11, 12, 13 and 14 and the bottom wall of base 23. Each of the side walls 11 through 14, as hereinafter described, is of double thickness having at least two panels.

The side walls 12 and 14 contain the saw-toothed panels 15 and 16, shown more particularly in Figure 6 which is a plan view of the blank of the carton 10 as cut by the dies, not shown, from an original extensive sheet of flexible cardboard. Referring now particularly to Figure 6 the saw-toothed panel 15 is connected by fold line 17 to the rectangular panel 18. The panels 15 and 18 together make up the side wall 12, as shown in Figure l. The side wall 14 is comprised of saw-toothed panel 16, described above, and the rectangular panel 19 connected thereto along the fold line 20.

Any number of meshing tooth elements may be used depending on the length of the carton and the tooth spacing required. In the following I show a carton of a length in which two teeth on one side and three teeth on the other side may be used. Also, as later described, the blank may be so arranged that an equal number of teeth may be used on each side.

The panels 15 and 16 have three teeth 15 and 16', respectively. The teeth 15 and 16' provide nesting with adjacent blanks as is hereinafter described in reference to the blanks 10 and shown in Figure 6. The rectangular panels 18 and 19 are connected along fold lines 21 and 22, respectively, to the opposite sides of the square shaped panel 23 which is the bottom wall panel 23 as described above in reference to Figure l.

The bottom wall panel or square panel 23 has connected thereto the rectangular panels 18 and 19 and also rectangular panels 42 and 43. The panel 42 is connected to the bottom wall panel 23 along the fold line 44 and the panel 43 is connected to the bottom wall panel 23 along the fold line 45. The fold lines 44 and 45 are on opposite sides of the bottom wall panel 23. The bottom wall panel 23 is, therefore, connected to a rectangular panel along each of its sides. These panels are as described above the panels 18, 43, 19 and 42.

The panels 42 and 43 are part of the side walls 11 and 13, respectively, and the panels 18 and 19 are part of the side walls 12 and 14 described above in reference to Figure 1.

*In addition to the foldable connection from one of the rectangular panels 18 and 19, 42 or 43 to the other rectangular panels 18, 19, 42 or 43 through the bottom wall panel 23, each of the rectangular panels 18, 19, 42 and 43 is foldably connected to its two adjacent rectangular panels through a corner connection. The panel 18, for example, is foldably connected through the corner connection of panel 35 and tab 39 to the rectangular panel 43 and through the corner connection of panel 34 and tab 38 to the rectangular panel 42.

The panel 18 is connected along the fold lines 32 and 33 which are essentially continuations of the fold lines 44 and 45, hereinafter described, to the connecting panels 34 and 35 respectively. The panels 34 and 35 are connected along the diagonal fold lines 36 and 37 to the connecting tabs 38 and 39 which are in turn connected along fold lines 40 and 41 to the rectangular panels 42 and 43 respectively.

The panel 19, described above, has connected thereto along the fold lines 46 and 47 the connecting panels 48 and 49 which are in turn connected along the diagonal fold lines 50 and 51 to the connecting tabs 52 and 53. The connecting tabs 52 and 53 are connected along fold lines 54 and 55 to sides of the panels 42 and 43, respectively, which are opposite the connecting tabs 38 and 39, described above.

The panels 42 and 43 are connected along the fold lines 57 and 58 to the erecting panels 59 and 60, which are hereinafter described. The erecting panels 59 and 60 have fold lines 61 and 62 to which are attached the locking panel strips 63 and 64. The panels 59 and 60 are also part of the side walls 11 and 13, respectively. The side wall 11 comprises the panels 59 and 42 in face to face relation and the side wall 13 comprises the panels 43 and 60 in face to face relation in the erected carton 10.

The sawed-tooth panel 15 has connected on opposite sides thereof along fold lines 24 and 25, the tabs 26 and 27 respectively. The tabs 26 and 27 are also shown in Figures 1, 3 and 4 and are provided to strengthen the poses of preventing binding during the act of assembling. corners of the erected carton 10, as is hereinafter described.

-Ihe saw-toothed panel 16 similarly has connected thereto along the fold lines 29 and 28 the tabs 30 and 31, shown also in Figures 1, 3 and 4.

In the construction of the erected carton from the blank as shown in Figure 6, panels and 16 are folded in along the fold lines 17 and 20 respectively into face to face relationship with the rectangular panels 18 and 19, and glued thereto as shown specifically in Figure 4. When the panels 15 and 16 are folded in, they carry therewith the tabs 26, 27, and 31. The tab 26 comes into face to face relationship with the connecting panel 34; the tab 27 comes into face to face relationship with the connecting panel the tab 31 comes into face to face relationship with the connecting panel 49; and the tab 30 comes into face to face relationship with the connecting panel 48. None of the tabs 26, 27, 30 or 31 are glued in their respective face to face relation to connecting panels 34, 35, 48 or 49.

After the panels 15 and 16 have been glued to the panel 18 and 19 respectively forming the side walls 12 and 14, the walls 12 and 14 are folded in along the fold lines 21 and 22, as shown more specifically in Figure 5.

When the walls 12 and 14 are folded in the connecting tabs 38, 39, 52 and 53 are brought into face to face relationship with the rectangular panels 42 and 43 as shown in Figure 3. The connecting tabs 38 and 52 are brought into face to face relation with the rectangular panel 42 and glued thereto and the connecting tabs 39 and 53 are brought into face to face relation with the rectangular panel 43 and glued thereto.

When the connecting tabs 38, 52, 39 and 53 are glued in position, the carton at this stage is shown in Figure 5 and is essentially a flat unit. There are no further gluing operations to be performed in completing the construction of the erected carton 10, as shown in Figure l. The construction, therefore, of the carton 10 is a simple and economical procedure having but two gluing operations; the first to glue the sawed-tooth panels 15 and 16 to the rectangular panels 18 and 19 respectively, and the second to glue the connecting tabs 38 and 52 to the rectangular panel 42 and the connecting tabs 39 and 53 to the rectangular panel 43.

The carton 10 in this stage in the erection, being essentially flat as described above, can be easily stored, shipped or packed. In some instances, the panels 59 and 60 are folded in about the folding lines 57 and 58 and the carton 10 is stored, shipped or packed in that condition.

The next step after the final folding operation as described above in the erection of the carton 10 is the erection of the side walls 12 and 14. The side walls 12 and 14 are moved toward a vertical position as shown in Figure 3. When the side walls 12 and 14 are moved toward this vertical position, the rectangular panels 42 and 43 are moved therewith to an oblique plane due to the glued connecting tabs 38, 39, 52 and 53 which connect through the connecting panels 34, 35, 48 and 49 respectively to the panels 42 and 43.

As the side walls 12 and 14 are erected and the panels 42 and 43 move up therewith, the panels 59 and 60 are folded in about the folding lines 57 and 58 into the space opened between the side walls 12 and 14. The panel 60 is folded over the tabs 27 and 31 and the panel 59 is folded over the tabs 26 and 30 until they are also approximately in a vertical plane. The erecting panels 59 and 60 and the respective locking panel strips 63 and 64 are so shaped, as is hereinafter described, as to be locked in position against the sawed-tooth panels 15 and 16, described above, when the panels 59 and 60 are folded over into a vertical plane.

The panel 59 is extended at 59A and 59B to a length slightly in excess of the remainder of the panel 59 as shown in Figures 3 to 6. Similarly, the panel 60 is extended at 60A and 60B to a length slightly in excess of the remainder of panel 60. The strips 63 and 64 are of a length equal to the extended lengths of the panels 59 and 60, including the portions 59A, 59B, 60A and 60B.

The extensions 59A, 59B, 60A and 60B are short locking extensions as is hereinafter described. When the panels 59 and 60 are folded over in the final step in constructing the erected carton 10, as shown in Figures 1 and 3, the extended portions 59A, 59B, 60A and 60B lock with the ends of the sawed-tooth panels 15 and 16. The sawed-tooth panel 15 has the portion 15A and 15B removed or notched from the two external teeth 15'. As the teeth 15', as well as the remainder of the panel 15, are glued to the panel 18 and thus immovable with respect thereto, the insertion of the extension 59A behind the notch 15A and the extension 60A behind the notch 15B maintains the panel 59 in its vertical position. At the same time, the strips 63 and 64 are bent outwardly about the fold lines 61 and 62, when the panels 59 and 60 are folding inwardly, locking beneath the bottom of the teeth 15', as shown more particularly in Figure 1.

Similarly, as the panels 59 and 60 are folded into their vertical erected position, the extensions 59B and 60B are locked behind the notches 16A and 16B of the two external teeth 16', respectively and strips 63 and 64 are locked beneath the teeth 16'.

The resulting erected carton 10 is locked in the open or erected position and can be collapsed by pulling inwardly on the strips 63 and 64 to force the extensions 59A, 59B, 60A and 60B from behind the locked position with the teeth 15' and 16'.

The particular construction of the sawed-tooth panels 15 and 16 provides for nesting with a differently constructed carton 110 shown in plan form in Figure 6 and in its erected form in Figure 2. The carton 110 is essentially the same as the carton 10 and its corresponding parts have been numbered in a similar manner with the addition of to each reference number. The difference between the carton and the carton 10 is in its sawed-tooth panels and 116 and its locking or erecting panels 159 and 160.

The panels 115 and 116 each have two teeth 115' and 116' respectively. The teeth 115 and 116' provide nesting with the teeth 15 and 16' of the adjacent blanks 10 described above as shown in Figure 6.

The slopes of the sides of the teeth 115 and 116' are so constructed that a single cutting edge will provide the shaping for the teeth 115' and 16 and another single cutting edge will provide the shaping of the teeth 15' and 116.

Thus, the blanks 10 and 110 are sequentially nested in a row of blanks.

The erecting panel has the extended edges 160A and 160B which perform the locking behind the outside cut edges of the teeth 115' and 116'. The extended portions 160A and 160B are long extensions as contrasted with the short extensions, 60A and 60B described above in reference to the blank 10.

The extensions 160A and 160B are long extensions in order to lock behind the outside cut portions of the teeth 116 and 115 which are close to the rectangular panels 118 and 119.

Similarly the erecting panel 159 has the long exten- :ions 159A and 159B to complete the locking of the erected carton.

The two blanks 10 and 110 can then be sequentially nested along the row providing blanks having a simple method of construction. The two cartons 10 and 110, in order to nest, are provided with either three teeth or two teeth. The carton 10, provided with three teeth, required a short extension on its erecting panels 59 and 60 to perform the locking and the carton 110, having two teeth, requires long extensions on its erecting panels 159 and 160 to perform the locking.

In the foregoing, I have described my invention in relation to specific embodiments thereof. Since further modifications will now become apparent to those skilled in the art, I wish to be limited only by the following claim.

I claim:

A plurality of nested blanks for double walled cartons each comprising a central square shaped bottom wall panel; a first, second, third and fourth rectangular panel each foldably connected to one side of said bottom wall panel; a first saw-toothed panel foldably connected to said first rectangular panel; a second saw-toothed panel foldably connected to said third rectangular panel; a first erecting panel foldably connected to said second rectangular panel, a second erecting panel foldably connected to said fourth rectangular panel, a first of said blanks having said first and second saw-toothed panels comprising an even number of teeth and a pair of locking notches and said first and second erecting panels of said first blank comprising a pair of long extensions, a second of said blanks having said first and second sawtoothed panels comprising an odd number of teeth and a pair of locking notches, and said first and second erect- References Cited in the file of this patent ing panels of said second blank comprising a pair of sjlllorltK extensions, sgid egen nJumberbof tegth ofhsaig firs; UNII ED STATES PATENTS an nesting wit sai 06 mm er 0 teet o sai second blank, said long extensions of said first and sec- 5 1 gig fg is? 3g ond erecting panels of said first blank being adapted to 2214813 Gu er Se 1940 mate with said locking notches of said first and second 2334425 Lovy] 1943 saw-toothed panels of said first blank, said short extensions 2429540 W 3 1947 of said first and second erecting panels of said second 2527702 m 6 1950 blank being adapted to mate with said notches of said 10 u my c first and second saw-toothed panels of said second blank.

Patent Citations
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US546767 *Jan 11, 1895Sep 24, 1895 Paper box
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US2214813 *Aug 27, 1937Sep 17, 1940Waldorf Paper Prod CoCollapsible paper box
US2334425 *Feb 23, 1940Nov 16, 1943Container CorpCarton
US2429540 *Sep 23, 1943Oct 21, 1947Procter & GambleCarton for powdery material
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2824684 *Apr 16, 1956Feb 25, 1958Diamond Match CoCarton
US2899120 *Jan 9, 1957Aug 11, 1959 James
US2962202 *Oct 23, 1957Nov 29, 1960Continental Can CoTrussed-end paperboard carton
US3276660 *Mar 30, 1965Oct 4, 1966Crown Zellerbach Canada LtdFruit basket and handle
US4055293 *Feb 4, 1977Oct 25, 1977Container Corporation Of AmericaTray with reinforced walls
US4214694 *Oct 25, 1978Jul 29, 1980Diamond International CorporationBox cover, blank therefor
US4447004 *Feb 7, 1983May 8, 1984Container Corporation Of AmericaCarton handle arrangement
US5363981 *Dec 30, 1992Nov 15, 1994Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Bridged integral liner
US6098873 *Feb 19, 1999Aug 8, 2000Pack `N` Stack, Inc.One piece folded and glued container with tabbed columns
US6213298 *Sep 3, 1999Apr 10, 2001Bbc International, Ltd.Shoe box with internal display and flip tag
US7870995 *Nov 13, 2009Jan 18, 2011Multi Packaging SolutionsFoldable packaging container
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US8550331 *May 20, 2011Oct 8, 2013Multi Packaging Solutions, Inc.Foldable container and attachments
US8887983Dec 22, 2010Nov 18, 2014Multi Packaging Solutions, Inc.Foldable packaging container
US9387952Oct 16, 2014Jul 12, 2016Multi Packaging Solutions, Inc.Foldable packaging container
US20110072719 *Sep 25, 2009Mar 31, 2011The John Henry Company, A Multi Packaging Solutions CompanyFolded pot cover
US20110089227 *Dec 22, 2010Apr 21, 2011Multi Packaging Solutions, Inc.Foldable Packaging Container
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EP0508397A1 *Apr 8, 1992Oct 14, 1992ALBERT FREY VERPACKUNGSENTWICKLUNGEN UND VERTRIEBS-GmbHCollapsible box
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/176, 229/178, 229/186, 229/933, 229/172
International ClassificationB65D5/24
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/933, B65D5/248
European ClassificationB65D5/24E