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Publication numberUS2702760 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 22, 1955
Filing dateApr 25, 1951
Priority dateApr 25, 1951
Publication numberUS 2702760 A, US 2702760A, US-A-2702760, US2702760 A, US2702760A
InventorsBarth Eugene I
Original AssigneeWestern Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of applying metallic stripes to a web of paper
US 2702760 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. l. BARTH Feb. 22, 1955 METHOD OF APPLYING METALLIC STRIPES TO A WEB OF PAPER Filed April 25, 19 51 [III [/11 ll IIIlIIIlI/l/lll'l l1 1 [11/11 1111 1/ V LII/[[1 111111111 [If 1/17/1111 I lllllll \llll U /J 9 a lvllll United States latent O METHOD or APPLYING MET LLIC STRIPES 'ro A WEB OF PAPER Application April 25, 1951, Serial No. 222,855

8 Claims. (Cl. 117-38) This invention relates to methods of and apparatus for coating articles, and more particularly to methods of and apparatus for sputtering metal coatings on elongated strips of insulating material.

In the manufacture of stripsof paper having a plurality of stripes or hands of metal extending along one face thereof and separated from each adjacent band for use in making condensers, it has been very difiicult to apply such bands of uniform thickness from edge to edge of each band. It has been proposed, in the past to completely mask each portion of the strip separating the bands. However, when this is done, heavier deposits of metal have been built up at the edgesof the stripes than at the central portions of the stripes, particularly when the portions to be striped have seeding particles thereon to facilitate precipitation of the primary coating metal.

An object of the invention is to provide new and 1mproved methods of and apparatus for coating articles.

Another object of the invention is to provide new and improved methods of and apparatus for applying stripes of metal coatings to elongated strips of insulating material.

A further object of the invention is to provide methods of and apparatus for forcing finely divided metal particies toward a strip while differentially masking the strip to form bands uniform in thickness from edge to edge.

In a method illustrating certain features of the invention, a strip of insulating material having seeded bands separated by uncoated stripes is advanced past a metal vaporizer, and theportion of the strip passing the vaporizer is masked differentially less proceeding from theuncoated portions toward the central portions of the A complete understanding of the invention may be obtained from the following detailed description of a method and an apparatus forming specific embodiments thereof, when read in conjunction with the appended drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a vertical section of an apparatus for practicing a method forming a specific embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal section taken along line 2-2 of Fi 1, an

iig. 3 is a perspective view of a portion of the apparatus shown in Fig. l.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, there is shown therein an apparatus for applying stripes or hands -10 of metal to a web or strip 11 of insulating material, such as, for example, thin paper coated within cellulose acetate butyrate on the face to be metallized, to form components of condensers. The strip 11is advanced continuously from a supply roll 12 mounted in a chamber 14, the interior of which is kept at a very low absolute pressure of from 0.25 to 0.5 millimeter of mercury. The paper is taken up on a takeup roll 16 and is advanced continuously over a seeding applicator 17 and a metallizing applicator 18. The applicator 17 includes a heated cham-- ber 20, which has a supply of a seeding metal 21 therein heated to the point of vaporization. The vaporrzedseeding metal, which may be silver, nickel, copper or the like, passes through openings 22-22 formed in a nozzle 23 and separated by solid masking strips 24-24 to form very thin seeding bands 25-25 on the strip, which are the same width as the bands 10-10.

The striped paper passes from the applicator 17 over a noule 30 of the metallizing apphcator 18, which mcludes a heated chamber 31 having a supply of molten 2,702,760 Patented Feb. 22, 1955 metal 32, such as zinc, aluminum or other suitable sputtertng metals. The metal is maintained at or near the boiling temperature thereof so that the metal is volatihzed and projected toward the nozzle 30 continuously. The nozzle 30 has an orifice 35 therein, which tapers from wide at the portions thereof over which the central portions of the bands 25-25 pass to narrow at portions thereof over which uncoated stripes 36-36 and uncoated edges 38-38 of the strip pass. Opposed pairs of intersecting arcs 39-39 form the orifice 35. Consequently, the outer edges of the bands 25-25 and the uncoated stripes 36-36 are masked greater than the central portions of each of these bands. However, the vaporized metal 32 projected through the orifice 35 moves from the spaces aligned with the uncoated stripes 36-36 into the edge portions of the seeded bands 25-25. The proportions of the exposed areas of the edge portions of the bands 25-25 relative to the exposed areas of the central portions of the bands 25-25 are such that the thickness of the metal precipitated on the bands is uniform in thickness from edge to edge. The strip 11 is advanced over the applicator 18 suificiently rapidly that the metal projected through the nozzle 30 coats only the seeded bands 25-25, does not adhere to the uncoated stripes 36-36 or uncoated edge portions 38-38 of the strip 11, and damage to the strip 11 from heat of the applicators and the volatilized metal is prevented.

, A strip of paper and cellulose acetate butyrate forming the surface to be coated was advanced over the applicators l7 and 18 continuously at a rate of speed of about 1500 feet per minute. The combined thickness of the paper and the cellulose acetate butyrate was in the order of 0.0003 inch. The interior of the chamber 14 was maintained under absolute'pressure of 0.1 millimeter of mercury, and zinc in the applicator 18 was maintained at a temperature of about 1100" F. Silver in the applicator 17 was maintained at a temperature of approximately 1750 F. Silver was applied uniformly to the ous, smooth, dense deposits of uniform thickness across the entire widths of the bands 25-25. The thickness of each of the bands 10-10 form one edge thereof to the opposite edge thereof and along the entire length of the strip was uniform, and there were sharp lines of demarcation at the edges of the bands between the metallized portions and the uncoated separating stripes 36-36 and edge portions 38-38 of the strip 11.

A lacquered strip of paper was advanced over the applicators 17 and 18 at a rate of speed of about 1500 feet per minute. The chamber 14 was maintained under an absolute pressure of about 0.1 millimeter of mercury, and aluminum in the applicator 18 was kept at a vaporization temperature. Silver in the applicator was kept at its vaporization temperature for the pressure of the chamber 14. Smooth, dense, fine-grained bands of aluminum uniform in thickness from edge to edge were formed and sputtered onto the strip through the nozzle with the unseeded portions on the strip kept entirely free of metal.

The nozzle 18 used in the above-described examples had an orifice 9% inches long in transverse cross-section and at the widest points thereof was -78 inch wide, while at the narrowest points thereof was inch wide. The orifice was formed by three pairs of opposed arcs of a radius of 19%,; inches. The bands 10-10 formed by the nozzle were 2.692 inches wide and were separated by uncoated stripes 36-36 0.326 inch in width. The thickness of the metal plate in which the orifice was formed was 0.062 inch, and the nozzle was composed of type 300 stainless steel.

It is to be understood that the above-described arrangements are simply illustrative of the application of the principles of the invention. Numerous other arrangements may be readily devised by those skilled in the art which will embody the principles of the invention and fall within the spirit and scope thereof.

What is claimed is:

1. The method of coating articles, which comprises advancing a strip of material having very thin seeded bands of a metal of the group consisting of silver, copper and nickel separated by unseeded stripes extending therealong continuously along a predetermined path, directing a vaporized coating of a metal of the group consisting of zinc and aluminum toward the strip at one portion of the path, and simultaneously masking all the strips atsaid portion of the path except a band across said portion that is narrow at the unseeded stripes and increases in width from the stripes toward the central portions of the seeded bands, whereby the second metal coats the bands uniformly from edge to edge without greater thickness at the edges.

2. The method of forming metallized strips of paper, which comprises advancing a strip of paper along a predetermined path, continuously applying vaporized silver at one point in said path to portions of the strip spaced laterally from one another to form very thin seeded bands on the strip spaced apart by uncoated stripes, directing vaporized zinc toward the strip at a subsequent point in the path, and simultaneously masking the strip incrementally less at said point from the uncoated stripes toward the centers of the seeded bands, whereby such difierence in masking overcomes any tendency of the zinc to be deposited more quickly at the edges of the band and results in a uniform thickness of coating across the width of the bands.

3. The method of making metallized paper, which comprises continuously advancing a strip of paper over a silver chamber and a zinc chamber, continuously directing vaporized silver in the silver chamber at the strip to coat the strip very thinly, completely masking laterally spaced portions of the portion of the strip being advanced over the silver chamber to form uncoated stn'pes separating the coated portions, directing vaporized zinc in the zinc chamber toward the strip to coat the strip, continuously exposing substantially the entire width of Y the strip to the vaporized zinc with the length of exposure of the strip to the vaporized zinc being a minimum at the uncoated stripes and increasing toward the center of each coated portion, whereby thicker deposits of zinc at the edges of coated portions are prevented and the zinc is deposited in uniform thickness across the coated portions.

4. The method of applying zinc to strips of paper, which comprises advancing a strip of paper having. very thin silver bands separated by unmetallized stripes extending therealong continuously along a predetermined path, directing vaporized zinc toward the strip at one portion of the path, and simultaneously masking all the strip at said portion of the path except a band across said portion that is narrow at the unmetallized stripes and increases in width from the stripes toward the central portions of the silvered bands, whereby the zinc coats the bands uniformly from edge to edge and thicker deposits at the edges of the bands are prevented.

The method of forming metallized strips of paper, which comprises continuously advancing a strip of paper along a predetermined path, creating low pressure around said path, continuously directing vaporized silver to portions of the strip spaced laterally from one another at one point in said path to form very thin seeded bands -on the strip spaced apart by uncoated stripes, vaporizing and directing zinc toward the strip at a subsequent point in the path, and continuously masking the strip incrementally less at said second point from the uncoated bands toward the centers 'of the seeded bands, whereby thickened edge portions of zinc are prevented and the zinc is deposited in layers uniform in thickness from edge to edge of each layer.

thin seeded bands on the strip spaced apart by uncoated strips, continuously projecting vaporized zinc toward the face of the strip at a subsequent point in the path, and

continuously masking the strip at said second point incrementally less from the uncoated stripes toward the centers of the seeded bands, whereby the zinc is deposited with uniform thickness from edge to edge of the seeded bands.

7. The method of metallizing strips, which comprises continuously advancing a strip of insulating material along a predetermined path in a predetermined direction, maintaining the space surrounding said path in a high vacuum, continuously directing toward the strip at one point in the path a vaporized metal of the group consisting of silver, nickel and copper adherent with respect to the strip at such a rate of deposition as to form an imperceptibly thin deposit of the metal of a thickness in the order of one molecular layer on the strip to form a band thereon, continuously directing toward the strip at a subsequent point in the path a second vaporized metal of the group consisting of zinc and aluminum adherent to the first metal, and simultaneously partially masking the portion of the strip continuously at said second point incrementally less from the edges of the band ing overcomes any tendency of the coating of the second metal to be thicker at the edges and is of uniform thickness acres the width of the band.

8'. The method of metallizing strips, which comprises continuously advancing a strip of insulating material along a predetermined path in a predetermined direction, maintaining the space surrounding said path in a high vacuum, continuously directing toward the strip at one point in the path vaporized silver at such a rate of deposition as to form an imperceptibly thin deposit of the silver on the strip to form a band thereon of a thickness in the order of one molecular layer, continuously directing zinc toward the strip at a subsequent point in the path, and simultaneously partially masking the portion of the strip from the edges of the .band toward the center of the band to deposit the zinc uniformly on the band to prevent thicker deposits of the zinc at the edges of the band and cause the deposits of'zinc to be uniform in thickness from edge to edge of the band.

References Cited in the tile of this patent 1 UNITED ATES PATENTS Melsheimer Mar. 25, 1952

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2754230 *Oct 25, 1952Jul 10, 1956Bell Telephone Labor IncMethod of making electrical capacitors
US2877145 *Feb 13, 1956Mar 10, 1959Nat Res CorpCoating
US2879739 *Jan 13, 1955Mar 31, 1959Nat Res CorpVaporized metal coating apparatus
US2921864 *Jul 25, 1955Jan 19, 1960Heberlein Patent CorpProcess for metalizing textiles and products therefrom
US2925062 *Oct 8, 1956Feb 16, 1960Heraeus Gmbh W CCoating apparatus
US2945771 *May 3, 1955Jul 19, 1960Mansfeld HubertFormation of light-sensitive layers on photographic films
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US2971862 *Apr 26, 1957Feb 14, 1961Nat Res CorpVapor deposition method and apparatus
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US3037205 *Oct 9, 1956May 29, 1962IbmMagnetic record disc with gassupported transducer
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Classifications
U.S. Classification427/251, 118/720, 427/288, 118/504, 427/282, 118/718, 427/296, 427/259
International ClassificationC23C14/02, C23C14/56, H01G13/06, C23C14/04
Cooperative ClassificationC23C14/025, H01G13/06, C23C14/562, C23C14/042, C23C14/044
European ClassificationC23C14/04B2, C23C14/02B2, C23C14/56B, C23C14/04B, H01G13/06