Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2702914 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 1, 1955
Filing dateNov 4, 1950
Priority dateNov 4, 1950
Publication numberUS 2702914 A, US 2702914A, US-A-2702914, US2702914 A, US2702914A
InventorsIrene T Kittle, Levi O Kittle
Original AssigneeIrene T Kittle, Levi O Kittle
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toothbrush
US 2702914 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1955 L. o. KITTLE ETAL TOOTHBRUSH Filed Nov. 4, 1950 INVENTOR LEVI O. KITTLE y AP /J5 77k/rr'LE w g d m mea United States Patent F TOOTHBRUSH Levi O. Kittle and Irene T. Kittle, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application November 4, 1950, Serial No. 194,048

6 Claims. (Cl. 15--114) This invention relates to toothbrushes and .has for one of its objects the provision of a tooth brush that is adapted to clean and polish the teeth more efficiently than heretofore and without injury to the tooth enamel.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a tooth brush that has a beneficial effect on the gums and at the same time is adapted to remove foreign particles from between the teeth to the line of the gums as efficiently as conventional tooth brushes.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a tooth brush that is sanitary and self cleaning in use insofar as foreign impurities, tooth paste, tooth powder and oral secretions are concerned.

Conventional tooth brushes comprise tufts of bristles in rows secured to a head or base member to which a handle is connected. The brushes are designated soft, medium, and hard, to indicate the stiffness of the bristles. Usually the tufts are pointed at their outer ends to facilitate entry of the bristles between the teeth.

Most of the bristles now used are of plastic material such as known under the trade-name of Nylon. These bristles are water-proof, durable, and relatively hard. Also they possess a high degree of resiliency.

Previous to the plastic bristles, hog bristles were commonly used. These were not as durable as the plastic bristles, and tended to become water soaked. However, in the bristles were natural abrasive substances that became exposed as the bristles would wear down thereby tending to polish the teeth.

Irrespective of the material of the bristles, they produce no more of a polishing action on teeth, even when used with tooth powder or paste, than the polishing action produced by any brush on a hard or enamel surface. Tooth paste and tooth powder commonly used contains a detergent or lathering agent and an abrasive, but the bristles, being hard merely tend to slide the abrasive ahead of them or to one side as the bristles pass over the teeth, and abrasive particles that may be pressed against the teeth by the bristles tend to scratch the latter due to the hardness of the bristles.

As a result of the above conditions, liquid tooth cleaners that are frankly detergents free from abrasive materials have found popularity, inasmuch as the result was the same whether or not an abrasive was present in the dentifrice.

One of the objects of the present invention is the provision of a tooth brush that is adapted to effect a gentle but effective uniform polishing action on the teeth when a dentifrice containing an abrasive, such as precipitated chalk, is used, thereby keeping the teeth sparkling and clean, and which brush is adapted to remove loose foreign particles from between the teeth with just as much efficiency as conventional brushes.

Another objection to conventional brushes is the fact that the bristles are in many instances too severe on the gums, causing them to bleed and to become sore.

The socalled soft brushes are not as harsh on the gums as the harder ones but where conventional structure is employed the hard bristles with their relatively sharp ends are painful any many times are injurious to the gums. All that is required in a brush is the provision of bristles than can reach between the teeth and along the juncture between the teeth and gums to remove particles of relatively loose foreign material.

An object of the present invention is the provision of a brush so designed and constructed as to reduce to the minimum any discomfiture from the bristles without view of the head of a toothbrush. The handle is broken away to accommodate the view to the sheet.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the brush head of Fig. 1 looking at the said head from the bristle side.

Figure 3 is a side elevational view of a form that is slightly different from that of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken along line 44 of Fig. 1. 5 is a sectional view taken along line 5-5 of Fig. 6 is a sectional view similar to that of Fig. 4, but showing slightly different tuft structure.

Fig. 7 is a greatly enlarged fragmentary sectional view showing the surface structure of the central portion of the brush.

Fig. 8 is a view similar to that of ing slightly different structure.

Fig. 9 is a sectional view illustrating the brush applied to teeth with the bristles between the latter.

Fig. 10 is a greatly enlarged fragmentary view showing the bristles and polishing member against a tooth.

In detail, the brush as illustrated in Figs. 1, 2, comprises a handle 1 provided with a head 2. The head in turn is preferably elongated longitudinally of the handle and is provided with a pair of spaced rows of tufts 3 of bristles extending longitudinally thereof with the rows in side by said relationship. 7

These tufts 3 each comprise a generally cylindrical group of bristles having one of their ends secured in the head 2. However, the bristles of each tuft spread apart slightly in direction away from said head, and at their outer ends the tufts generally come to a point 4 with the maximum diameter of the tufts being where the pointed ends of the tufts commence, and closely adjacent the outer ends of the tufts or along the dot-dash line XX.

Between the rows of tufts 3 is a longitudinally .extending strip of compressible, resilient, soft material 5, preferably having the characteristics of foam rubber. This strip 5 is secured to the head 2 by any suitable means, and the outer surface is preferably fiat and terminates substantially at the same level as the outer end of the tufts 3.

The ends of strip.5 terminate adjacent the outer and inner ends of the head 1, and preferably, one or more end tufts 6 (Fig. 2) of bristles are between the outer end of said head and the end of the strip adjacent said outer end.

These tufts 6 may be of the same height as the tufts of rows 3 that are adjacent thereto, or they may be even longer. tufts may even be shorter.

One or more tufts 7 (Fig. 2) may be at the end of strip 5 that is opposite the tufts 6, and here the tuft 7 should be of substantially the same height as the adjacent tufts 3.

In the drawing, the tufts 3 become shorter in direction toward the outer end of the head. They may be the same Fig. 7, but showlength, or as has already been explained, the end tufts.

6 may be longer than the tufts 3 adjacent thereto.

The outer flat surface 9 (Fig. 7) of the strip 5 where the strip is of foam rubber or plastic, is formed with small irregularities where the cell walls are cut, and this provides pockets for the retention ofthe abrasive, such as the precipitated chalk that. is in the powder or paste dentifrices during movement of the strip over the teeth.

As seen in Figs. 9, 10 when the brush is applied to the teeth, the outer surface 9 of strip 5 conforms to the surface contour of the teeth and yieldably holds the dentifrice against the outer surface of the teeth when the brush head is reciproeated in any direction. The

outer ends of the bristles readily enter the spaces between. the teeth to dislodge foreign particles of food that may.

have become lodged there.

Preferably, the width of the strip 5 is such that the As shown in Fig. 1 at least one of said endtend to reinforce the strip. The strip is quite yieldable and resilient, and may not have the strength of the bristles. Thus in brushing and polishing the teeth the strip will be held by the bristles against too much distortion so that the ffat outer surface of said strip will bear against the teeth at all times. i

As a modification of the structure of Fig. l, a supporting base (Fig. 8) may be provided for a soft resilient strip 11 that has the same or substantially the same characteristics as strip 51 and that provides an outer polishing surface 12. As shown in Fig. 8, the outer surface 12 may be intentionally grooved transversely of the strip 11. or cross grooved. as desired. to provide an even greater capacity for retaining an abrasive on said surface. The base 10 may be flexible. but less so than strip 11, and the base need not necessarily be moisture absorbent.

It is clearly to be understood that the reference to the retenti n of abrasi e on the surface 9 (Fig. 7) or 12 (Fig. 8) is not to be confused with such structure as is shown in the U. S. patent to Adamsson. No. 2,312,828 of March 2, 1943. in which there is a central recess in the brush to hold a supply of a dentifrice. In said patent the bottom of the central recess is well below the maximum diameter of the tufts and cannot contact the teeth. whereas in the present invention the surfaces 9, 12 must contact the teeth without substantial distortion of the bristles or the invention would not be operable for its intended purposes.

Tn Fi s. 3, 5 the same bristles 3. 6 and 7 are shown as in Fins. l, 4. but in this form of the invention the strip 14 that is between the rows of bristles has its outer flat s rface at b antially he le el of th maximum diameter of the bristles. or where the pointed ends of the tufts conv ne. This is the same level as that defined by line X-X of Fig. l.

n this fo m of the invention, the pointed ends of the bristles readily pass into the s aces between the teeth and the outer surface of the strip engages the surfaces of the tee h in substantially t e same manner as in the oreviouslv described form. There is ractically no distortion of the bristles and the polishing surface of strips. However. the ou er surface of the stri should be at least at substantiall the same level as that of the maximum di meter of the tufts, and not substantially below said level.

Tn the form of invention shown in Fi s. 1, 3 the outer surface of the ce tral strip. which may be termed a polishing strip. will always contact the surfaces of the teeth in a n rmal and relatively mild brushing operation.

Tn the form of invention shown in Fig. 6 the maximum diameter of the tufts 16 is at the outer ends of the tufts, in which case the central strip 17, which corresponds with strin 5. extends to the level of said maximum diameter.

The rovision of the strip 5, or 14 between the rows of tufts 3 pre ents the dentifrice that is on said stri from passin to the spaces between the lower ends of the tufts of said rows. and where the said stri s have moisture absorbent characteristics. the brush is virtually self cleanin inasmuch as the exnressins of water from the strip washes away the particles or impurities that otherwise mi ht tend to cling to the sides. Also, water is supplied by the strip to the dentifrice. which is particularly desirable where the latter is in powder form.

In Fi 10, the polishing action of the polishing strip 5 is clear seen, and also the cleaning action of the bristles. However. as hereinbefore noted, and as seen in Fin. 10. the bristles do not perform a polishing acti n. They tend to clean the tee h 20 of loose or dis lodneable particles. but do not polish. and any dentifrice on the teeth is merely. pushed or moved b the bristles across the teeth without accomplishing a olishing action.

By the present invention, a true polishing action is performed and the harsh. iniurious effect of the bristles on the gums 21 is materially lessened without reducing the efficacv of the bristles for removing loose foreign mate rial from between the teeth.

The present device in any of its preferred forms virtually comprises a central polishing strip of soft, resilient material flanked by longitudinally extending rows of bristle tufts in which the polishing surface of the strips is at a level closely adiacent or substantially at the outer ends of said tufts whereby the said surface and said tufts will be simultanously. in engagement with the teeth in a or a th. sh n oper ion It is desirable that the polishing strip be compressible to enable any desired contact between the bristles and the teeth for removal of particles of foreign material, a result which would not be possible by providing mere flexibility of a central element or elements.

The claims are intended to cover all changes and modifications of the example of the invention herein chosen for purposes of the disclosure, which do not constitute departure from the spirit and scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. in a tooth brush having an elongated head provided with an elongated tooth polishing member extending longitudinally of and projecting from one side of said head, means for firmly securing said member to said head and said member having a tooth engaging polishing surface facing outwardly of said head, said surface being planar and formed with relatively small outwardly opening recesses for holding an abrasive thereon such as precipitated chalk during reciprocatory movement of said surface over the surfaces of the teeth in a brushing operation, a row of elongated tufts of bristles secured to said head and positioned along each side of and extending substantially from end to end of the latter with the bases of said tufts at said head spaced apart to permit flow of water between said bases, the sides of said tufts remote from said member being exposed with the outer ends of said tufts remote from said head terminating adjacent said polishing surface, the portion of said member adjacent to and supporting said surface being compressible axially of said tufts to facilitate entry of the outer ends of said tufts between the teeth during polishing engagement between said polishing surface and said teeth, said portion of said member including said polishing surface being flexible and having the physical characteristics of foam rubber in which said recesses are outwardly opening pores of said member, said portion of said member being positioned on said head for engagement with and for receiving support from bristles of tufts at each side of said portion during flexing of said portion transversely of its length in said brushing operation.

2. In a tooth brush having an elongated head provided with an elongated tooth polishing member extending longitudinally of and projecting from one side of said head, means for firmly securing said member to said head and said member having a tooth engaging polishing surface facing outwardly of said head, said surface being formed with relatively small outwardly opening recesses for holding an abrasive thereon sutch as precipitated chalk during reciprocatory movement of said surface over the surfaces of the teeth in a brushing operation, a row of elongated tufts of bristles secured to said head and positioned along each sides of said member with the bases of said tufts at said head spaced apart to permit flow of water between said bases and the sides of said tufts remote from said member being exposed, with the outer ends of said tufts remote from said head terminating adjacent said polishing surface, the portion of said member adjacent to and supporting said surface being compressible axially of said tufts to facilitate entry of the outer ends of said tufts between the teeth during polishing engagement between said polishing surface and said teeth, said tufts being progressively thicker from said head outwardly with the maximum thickness of each tuft adjacent the outer end thereof, and said polishing surface being at a distance from said head substantially no lesser distance than the distance of the maximum thickness of each tuft from said head said tufts adjacent their maximum thickness being substantially in engagement with said member, and a tuft of bristles secured to said head positioned at an end of said member.

3. in a tooth brush having an elongated head provided with an elongated tooth polishing member extending longitudinally of and projecting from one side of said head, means for firmly securing said member to said head and said member having a tooth engaging polishing surface facing outwardly of said head, said surface being formed with relatively small outwardly opening recesses for holding an abrasive thereon such as precipitated chalk during reciprocatory movement of said surface over the surfaces of the teeth in a brushing operation, a row of elongated tufts of bristles secured to said head and positioned along each side of said member and extending substantially from end to end of the latter with the bases of said tufts at said head spaced apart to permit flow of water between said bases, the sides of said tufts remote from said member being exposed with the outer ends of said tufts remote from said head terminating adjacent said polishing surface, the portion of said member adjacent to and supporting said surface being flexible and compressible axially of said tufts to facilitate entry of the outer ends of said tufts between the teeth during polishing engageernnt between said polishing surface and said teeth, said tufts being progressively thicker from said head outwardly with the maximum thickness of each of tuft adjacent the outer end thereof, and said polishing surface being at a distance from said head substantially no lesser distance than the distance of the maximum thickness of each tuft from said head, the outer ends of said tufts being pointed, said portion of said member being positioned on said head for engagement with and for receiving support from bristles of tufts at each side of said portion during flexing of said portion transversely of its length in said brushing operation.

4. In a toothbrush having an elongated head provided with an elongated tooth polishing member extending longitudinally of and projecting from one side of said head, said member being firmly secured to said head and having a tooth engaging polishing surface facing outwardly of said head, a row of elongated tufts of bristles secured to said head and positioned at each side of said member with the bases of said tufts at said head spaced apart to permit flow of water between said bases, the sides of said tufts remote from said member being exposed with the outer ends of said tufts remote from said head and said polishing surface being substantially in a common plane, the portion of said member adjacent to and supporting said surface being compressible axially of said tufts to facilitate entry of the outer ends of said tufts between the teeth during polishing engageemnt between said polishing surface and said teeth, said portion of said member being of moisture absorbent, flexible, and compressible material said portion of said member being positioned on said head for engagement with and for receiving support from bristles of tufts at each side of said portion during flexing of said portion transversely of its length in a normal tooth brushing operation.

5. In a toothbrush having an elongated head with longitudinally extending edges and a side between said edges provided with an elongated tooth polishing member of resilient, flexible, compressible, moisture absorbent material extending longitudinally of and projecting from the central portion of said side, a row of elongated tufts of bristles extending longitudinally of said member at each side of the latter and projecting from the surfaces of said side of said head alongside the surface of said central portion with the bases of said tufts at said head spaced apart to permit flow of water between said bases, the outer ends of said turfts terminating adjacent to said polishing surface and the sides of said tufts facing outwardly of said member being exposed, said member being firmly secured to said surface of said central portion, said surfaces alongside said last mentioned surface extending substantially straight outwardly from said central portion to said longitudinally extending edges and said surface of said central portion being substantially no closer to the side of said head opposite said member than said surfaces from which said tufts project, whereby, upon compression of said member, liquid held in said member and in the portion of said member adjoining said surface of said central portion may substantially be expressed therefrom for flushing foreign matter and micro-organ isms from said member and from said portion and from said surfaces and from around and between said tufts said member being positioned on said head for engagement with and for receiving support from bristles of tufts at each side of said member during flexing of said member transversely of its length in a normal tooth brushing operation.

6. In a toothbrush having an elongated head provided with an elongated tooth polishing member of moisture absorbent, flexible, resilient and compressible material extending longitudinally of and projecting from one side of said head, said member being firmly secured to said head and having a tooth engaging polishing surface facing outwardly of said head, a group of tufts of bristles secured to said head and positioned along each side of said member and extending substantially from end to end thereof with said tufts spaced apart at their bases at said head to permit flow of liquid therebetween, said group including tufts which have their sides remote from said member exposed and also incuding tufts with sides adjacent to each of the opposite sides of said member which will engage and support said member on each side of the latter when said member is flexed transversely of its length, said polishing surface and the outer ends of the tufts of said group being substantially in a common plane whereby said polishing surface will engage the teeth when the outer ends of bristles of tufts of said group are between adjacent teeth in a normal toothbrushing operation.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 90,763 Marshall June 1, 1869 1,128,139 Hoffman Feb. 9, 1915 1,191,556 Blake July 18, 1916 1,673,638 Peterson June 12, 1928 2,117,174 Jones May 10, 1938 2,312,828 Adamsson Mar. 2, 1943 2,567,764 Davies Sept. 11, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS 207,195 Switzerland of 1940

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US90763 *Jun 1, 1869 Improved bath-brush
US1128139 *Oct 31, 1913Feb 9, 1915John P HoffmanTooth-brush.
US1191556 *Aug 31, 1915Jul 18, 1916Philip W BlakeTooth-brush.
US1673638 *Jul 28, 1927Jun 12, 1928Clifford PetersonToothbrush
US2117174 *Nov 13, 1936May 10, 1938James M JonesTooth brush
US2312828 *Nov 30, 1940Mar 2, 1943Emil G AdamssonToothbrush
US2567764 *Apr 10, 1947Sep 11, 1951Davies Arthur BApplicator head for fountain brushes
CH207195A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2935754 *Feb 21, 1957May 10, 1960Wade Wenger & Associates IncCarpet mop
US3175256 *Mar 21, 1962Mar 30, 1965Schlegel Mfg CoWeather strip
US4961242 *Mar 16, 1989Oct 9, 1990Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft Auf AktienWet mop head for floor mop
US5249327 *Aug 26, 1992Oct 5, 1993Marilyn O. HingHand held
US5735011 *Nov 19, 1996Apr 7, 1998Asher; Randall S.Plaque removing toothbrush
US5926897 *May 10, 1996Jul 27, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyToothbrush having bristles for interproximal cleaning
US5930860 *Mar 27, 1996Aug 3, 1999Shipp; Anthony D.Prophy bristle toothbrush
US6178583May 28, 1999Jan 30, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyToothbrush having bristles for interproximal cleaning
US6513182Sep 18, 2000Feb 4, 2003Unilever Home & Personal Care Usa, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Toothbrush
US6658688Sep 17, 2002Dec 9, 2003James A. Gavney, Jr.Squeegee device and system
US6725493May 6, 2002Apr 27, 2004Unilever Home & Personal Care Usa, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Toothbrush
US6820299Mar 5, 2003Nov 23, 2004James A. Gavney, Jr.Dentition cleaning device and system
US6820300Aug 13, 2003Nov 23, 2004James A. Gavney, Jr.Squeegee device and system
US6859969Jun 3, 2003Mar 1, 2005James A. Gavney, Jr.Multi-directional wiping elements and device using the same
US6865767Sep 19, 2001Mar 15, 2005James A. Gavney, Jr.Device with multi-structural contact elements
US6944903May 5, 2004Sep 20, 2005Gavney Jr James ADentition cleaning device and system
US6996870Apr 1, 2002Feb 14, 2006Colgate-Palmolive CompanyContouring toothbrush head
US7047589Oct 6, 2004May 23, 2006Gavney Jr James ADentition cleaning device and system
US7051394Jun 30, 2004May 30, 2006Gavney Jr James ADentition cleaning device and system
US7069615Jun 30, 2004Jul 4, 2006Gavney Jr James ASqueegee device and system
US7137163Sep 27, 2002Nov 21, 2006Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPower toothbrush and power source
US7143462Jun 18, 2004Dec 5, 2006Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US7168125Oct 14, 2004Jan 30, 2007Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush
US7181799Oct 24, 2003Feb 27, 2007Eegee, LlcOral-care device and system
US7213288Mar 25, 2005May 8, 2007Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush
US7273327Nov 15, 2004Sep 25, 2007Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US7322067Dec 4, 2006Jan 29, 2008Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US7363675Sep 26, 2005Apr 29, 2008Gavney Jr James ASqueegee device and system
US7434288Aug 24, 2004Oct 14, 2008Gavney Jr James AOral care device with multi-structural contact elements
US7562411Aug 19, 2004Jul 21, 2009Gavney Jr James AOral-care device and system
US7594293Oct 28, 2005Sep 29, 2009Colgate-Palmolive Co.Oral care implement
US7707676Jun 30, 2006May 4, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyToothbrush
US7725980Dec 15, 2004Jun 1, 2010Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US7743448Aug 19, 2005Jun 29, 2010Gavney Jr James ADevice and system with moving squeegee fields
US7814603Mar 29, 2005Oct 19, 2010Gavney Jr James APowered toothbrush with polishing elements
US7814604Mar 14, 2005Oct 19, 2010Gavney Jr James ADevice with multi-structural contact elements
US7836539May 5, 2005Nov 23, 2010Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US7841041May 8, 2006Nov 30, 2010Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US7845042May 5, 2005Dec 7, 2010Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US7877833Jul 6, 2005Feb 1, 2011Gavney Jr James AOral-care device and system
US7934284Feb 11, 2003May 3, 2011Braun GmbhToothbrushes
US7941886Sep 19, 2003May 17, 2011Braun GmbhToothbrushes
US7950100Oct 31, 2007May 31, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US7954191Apr 9, 2007Jun 7, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush
US7958589Jun 12, 2009Jun 14, 2011The Gillette CompanyToothbrushes
US7962991Aug 14, 2006Jun 21, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush
US7975339Jul 20, 2004Jul 12, 2011Gavney Jr James AAquatic scrubber
US7975343Jun 21, 2006Jul 12, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush
US7975344Jul 6, 2007Jul 12, 2011The Gillette CompanyToothbrush head
US7975346Mar 31, 2010Jul 12, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8042214Sep 16, 2009Oct 25, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8091170May 6, 2010Jan 10, 2012Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8141194May 4, 2005Mar 27, 2012Gavney Jr James AAbsorbent structures with integrated contact elements
US8151397Jun 26, 2008Apr 10, 2012Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement having flexibly supported cleaning elements extending in opposite directions
US8171591 *Dec 9, 2004May 8, 2012Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Power toothbrush brushhead with fluid-directing member
US8201298Feb 9, 2007Jun 19, 2012Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush with low profile head
US8276231Dec 7, 2005Oct 2, 2012Gavney Jr James AOral-care device and system
US8276233Dec 3, 2004Oct 2, 2012Gavney Jr James AMulti-directional wiping elements and device using the same
US8281448Oct 3, 2007Oct 9, 2012Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement having one or more moving sections
US8332982Aug 24, 2009Dec 18, 2012The Gillette CompanyVibrating toothbrush
US8522386May 26, 2011Sep 3, 2013Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8523888Dec 18, 2006Sep 3, 2013Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8528148Jun 7, 2011Sep 10, 2013The Gillette CompanyToothbrush head
US8550736Mar 4, 2010Oct 8, 2013Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8578546Oct 2, 2012Nov 12, 2013Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement having one or more moving pieces
US8628263Sep 10, 2007Jan 14, 2014Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8695149Apr 1, 2011Apr 15, 2014Braun GmbhToothbrushes
US20120110765 *Nov 8, 2010May 10, 2012Mony Industrial Co., Ltd.Cleaning brush
USRE44819Apr 8, 2004Apr 1, 2014Procter & Gamble Business Services Canada CompanyToothbrush
EP1308108A1 *Sep 14, 2000May 7, 2003Unilever N.V.Toothbrush
EP1350442A1 *Mar 31, 2003Oct 8, 2003Colgate-Palmolive CompanyContouring toothbrush head
EP1645207A2 *Sep 14, 2000Apr 12, 2006Unilever N.V.Toothbrush
WO1998018364A1 *Oct 30, 1997May 7, 1998Procter & GambleToothbrush with combination of bristles, soft cleansing pad, and/or polishing fingers
WO1998022000A1 *Nov 6, 1997May 28, 1998Randall S AsherPlaque removing toothbrush
WO1999060886A1 *May 20, 1999Dec 2, 1999Ivan DuranaToothbrush
WO2001021036A1 *Sep 14, 2000Mar 29, 2001Lever Hindustan LtdToothbrush
WO2002034083A1 *Oct 24, 2000May 2, 2002Georges Louis MinvielleToothbrush
WO2003084364A1 *Mar 31, 2003Oct 16, 2003Colgate Palmolive CoContouring toothbrush head
WO2004071237A1 *Jan 27, 2004Aug 26, 2004Gillette CoToothbrushes
WO2005122828A1 *Jun 13, 2005Dec 29, 2005Aleksander BorgenhovA foldable toothbrush, a toothpaste sachet and a dental care kit
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/114, 15/167.1, 15/110
International ClassificationA46B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA46B2200/1066, A46B15/0075, A46B15/00
European ClassificationA46B15/00C8, A46B15/00