Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2703713 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 8, 1955
Filing dateJun 18, 1951
Priority dateJun 18, 1951
Publication numberUS 2703713 A, US 2703713A, US-A-2703713, US2703713 A, US2703713A
InventorsRay W Moyer
Original AssigneeRay W Moyer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game board apparatus
US 2703713 A
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 8, 1955 R. w. MOYER 2,703,713

GAME BOARD APPARATUS Filed June 18, 1951 4 Sheets-Sheet l AST" j 'Xi RAV W MOVEI? INVENTO/P HUEBNER, BEEHLER,

WORREL 8 HERZ/6 ATTORNEVS March 8, 1955 R. w. MoYER GAME BOARD APPARATUS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 18, 1951 8m., QoS o Qn. O

O 0 O O om u nf 0 O O o o Q0 buona my uf Mob/ER /NVENTOR HUEB-NER, BEEHLER,

WOR/PEL 8 HERZ/6 Arrow/vers swf/'M March 8, 1955 R. w. MOYER 2,703,713

GAME BOARD APPARATUS Filed June 18, 1951 4 sheets-sheet s HUEBNER, BEEHLER,

WOR/PEI. 8 HERZ/6 ATTORNEYS Cgil RAY nf Mos/ER 2 /Nl/ENTO/Q 1 J March 8, 1955 R, w, MOYER 2,703,713

. GAME BOARD APPARATUS Filed June 18. 1951 4 sheets-sheet 4 36 RAY uf Mor/ER gzim @JZALW :7225,15

BMWi@ United States Patent OA @maf/'13 BoARD APPARATUS We Moyer, Eremo, .Application ,1.8, 1.25.1, definirlo :232.24.24 :16 Claims- (Cl- 2757-1131) The present invention relates to games o f skill and more particularly to a. simulated war rgame apparatus in whioh" the .hazards of ohanoe are .minimized by player ehoieeiseleetion, planning, and strategy .Asmanyoi the complexities of 4I nodern warfare are simulated in the game as practical without exceeding appropriate requirements of memory, understanding; and skill of a .social 4oontest- The genral .Class of wat gaines 'to which the subieot invention relates is eharaeteriaed Yby the well-known ,gaine of ohess- Although ehess is of prehistorie origin; antignitv does not hide its military basis- .Its employment `ldngs. queens, bishops, lmight's, eateries.. and pawns having individual oharaeteristie'nioyement about on a eheelrer hoard playing .tield of 64 squares lClearly identiliesthe warfare simulated arehaie-` .1.1.1 spite 'oi 'the obsolete eharaoter oi the warfare .represented, ehess has remained e popular through the Centuries and .modernly p wn inevery civilized Country of the world .in substantially identical .form

it is 4an Vobject ofthe present invention .to provide an improved simulated wargame day counterparts incorporated.

Another object is to .-proyide cl simulated war game apparatus in. .hieh playing pieees are movable over e Playing field representatiyepi .e wide areas .oi military eonniet involved in dern war 311- emountainons vregierte,plains,,sea dthel -l-hrother obeet is to rovide .sminlated gaine in whioh `the ee'onomie .faetors of metiera .variare .tind e eonnterpart- .Another obieet is to provide .a game in whieh is provided a plurality oi goals or ,objeetivea attaining of ailiy one .of whiehstigniiies victory .for the player attaming t ev oel.

gnother .objeot is ,to provide game in hieh .players lhave a wide variety of playing responsf ample responsihilities .similar .to those of manpower ,direotorsa foree generalsand th `Anorl-1er obieot playing neld .for

. ee. in. rrny generals., navy .is to provide .a board 4.een.stituting a rnoyahle p ees a .game which divided into a pl. lity .of tr'aets including' playing spaoes o f predetermined ape .and to theirnespeetive tracts,-

Anothe objeot .is to-provide in leombinat-,ion with a board .oi .the ehafrao r .deseiihed in Athe preceding ...graph playing pieoes w. hy =the shape `of ,portions thereof identity the .traet .eonstitnting .their larea oi play and by shapes of portions thereof., .elr movement sharaeteristiesin .relation `totheir playing spacesi .Another-object ,is .to provide, .in 'a game employing a lso- .rdeonst ting. a Aplaying field, aplhrality of types of playing pien ...ny .orall of a -giyenftype of which tney-be en ...rrently .moved a ,single'step .during a single play. 'Another object is to provide' a plurality xof ,playing pieces in a game of the Aehnrsoter ldeseriped in which by eombining predetermined .of ,pieces the feomhined piecesaremovahleiunitarily.

' lp kriolthet objeotis tto proydeafplurality of individually movable fplaying p ieces which are lassociable in .order to acquire yadditional.movement capabilities.

AAnother .,object tis eiectlivel-y to Isimulate modern day warfare instrumentalities -in asimulated -war Egame; Asumc'jli as -movahle and immovable pieces, toontmnnieation army units, minor land major mechanized or tank units,

ordered arrangement enigme wh varions obsolete characteristics of warfare are eliminated and thelr modern all 2,703,713 latentetl Mar.. 8, 1.53.55

2 eargo ships, minor and maior lighting air eretti saperborbs simulating atom bombs"and"hyg^r9gep bombs, .blockade areas, neutral land areas obtainable hy genauest, budgets, and the like- Another o bJ'eet is to provide a gamein whieh the handirIn the drawings: -Fig- 1 is a perspeetive view of a game 'board Yr.nhotlylng prineiples of the present invention .and showing on a variety of playing pieees .and areas subsequently trated in greater partieularity.-

Fig 2 is an edge elevation .of ,the board shown in lFigt 1.- '.Fig- 3 is a plan view of .the playing boardoi-Figs- "l and 2.

.Fig- 4 is a perspective view o f an artny unit playing piece;

Fig 5 is `a fragmentary plan view of a land trant ,of

: the playing .hoard showing .an .army unit .thereon and illustrating typical movements thereof.-

.Fig ..6 is .a perspe ive view of a meohaniaed `.or lighttenlt, plyingpleoe..

n*Fig 7 is a fragmentary plan view .of .a portion of .the land traet .ot .the playing' :board illustrating oharaeterlstie movements oi .the minor .rneohenized unit playing piege thereon- .Fig ,is a perspeetiye view of a maiormeehanized nuit,

y,r ....avy .tanta playing pieee showing .a plnrality of unit playing pieoes rele'a'slably mounted thereinfig. 9 isf .a iregmentary .plan view of -..the',land trant of the playing .board illustrating. Johernster.isti.o moves of fthe maior meehanieed. playing piece.

.n.Fig 19 .a perspeetiye view .of a eargo ship playing Riese.-

Fig- ,1.1 .1s .a ,fragmentary plan viewof asea traet fof vthe playing board illustrating .oharaeteristio movements of .a eergo shipplaymg p oe shownthereon- ,1.2 .is a pers tive view of aminor fighting ship ting a -.eount.erpart `tor `destroyer eseorts, destroyers, light eruisers and the .like oeeupied by amanpower ','liig- 1.3 .is a ,fragmentary .plan view of the .seat trapt illustrating eharaeteristio moves of a minor righting ship playing pieoeshown thereon Y rFigi .l4 Ais .a perspective view of a maior righting ship playing pieee .eonstituting a counterpart for `hattleshipls., heayylerhisers, andthelike F.ig 41.5 is .a n.fragmentary plan view of the .sea traet illustrating .eharaeteristie movements of .the majorlighting ship playing pieoeshownthereonl' iFig- .lo .isa perspeetiye view of a communication line playing piede. Figi 1.7 iis 4a fragmentary pla-n view .of the land .traet showing employment .of La eommunioation line playing pieee ,made possible .by the oooupation of'adiaoent portions of the .land tract by varmy unit playing piecestFig 1,8 is a perspective view ,of a land bas playing prese- .Fig- Y1.9 .is a fragmentary plan view `ot .the land traet showing the employment of a .land hase playing pieee made possihle by arrangement of feommunieation line playing pieces in circumscribing relation thereto. iEivg, Otis aperspectiyegviewof a seafbase ,p layingipiece. gFifg. `24,1 Y.is dil elevationof a .Combined sea rhaselplaying pieoe and a pair of .minor righting ship playin'g'pieoes arrangedin supporting relation thereto and afoeompanied by Ja .third minor lighting ship playingpieee required as aneseort .foroertain types'ofplay- H A' Eg. 22 is a perspective View of an piece.

AFig. A25 is va fragmentary .plan ,viewof the sea tract/and landtract showing ,the .employment ,of ,a land Abase Mand airoreft playing epmrnunication .lines thereon :melting possible fthe-use of en aireraftiplayingpieee- 'i Fig. 24 1s a perspective view of a removable land plat 2,703,713 Y Y y. A

positionable for the duration of a game on a selected porv tion of the land tract.

Fig. is a perspective view of the reverse side of the removable land plat from that shown in Fig. 24.

Fig. 26 is a fragmentary plan View of the land tract demonstrating employment of a pair of plats shown in Fig. 24 thereon.

Fig. 27 is a fragmentary plan view of the land tract fragmentarily showing a base playing piece thereon,`an aircraft playing piece, and a superbomb playing piece.

Referring in greater detail to the drawings:

While a single embodiment of the subject invention is illustrated in the drawings and 'that embodiment subsequently described herein as involving land areas, sea areas, bases, weapons and other appurtenances to modern warfare, it is to be understood that in its broader aspect the subject invention is not limited to the representation or simulation of the specific elements of the game inasmuch as playing pieces simulating other appropriate weapons and the like are comprehended within the scope of the invention. Much of the interest of the game lies in the selective purchase of the tools of warfare and the strategic and tactical positioning and movement thereof for attack and defense purposes. Although a speciiic form of the game is described in detail, it will be obvious that various modifications may be made therein to simplify or to increase the complexity of the contest as the ability of players may require. Further, although the game is described as played by a pair of contestants, the number of contestants is not fixed and any greater number within reasonable limits may be accommodated by forming teams or by arbitrarily designating additional bases from which to operate by the employment of the removable plats shown in Figs. 24 and 25.

A board constituting a playing field for the game of the present invention is indicated generally at 30. The playing area of the board is divided into a pair of contiguous tracts 31 and 32. The track 31 is representative of land terrain and for descriptive convenience is' referred to herein as a land tract. The tract 32 is representative of Seascape (or sea area) and for descriptive convenience is referred to as a sea tract.

The land track 31 includes a plurality of equilateral triangular plats 35 which are preferably raised on the board and conveniently formed by gluing or otherwise at'ixing triangular members of sheet material thereto. For reasons soon to become apparent, the plats'are preferably approximately one-sixteenth of an inch thick. The plats are grouped in hexagonal and fractohexagonal areas 36 each consisting of a plurality of laterally adjacent triangular plats each of which has a corner contiguous with a corner of every other plat of its respective area. It will be obvious that any desired number of areas may be employed. Fractohexagonal areas are utilized adjacent to an end of the board, if desired. Space on the board 30 adjacent to the land tract 31 not occupied by land areas may conveniently be utilized for game instructions, not shown. The adjacent plats of each area 36 are of visually distinguishable color or shading, diametrically opposite plats of each area of the same color or shading, and adjacent plats of adjacent areas of the same color or shading. The areas are arranged in adjacent spaced relation with adjacent sides of adjacent plats of adjacent areas in parallel spaced relation defining a receiving channel 37 therebetween.

Movable plats 39 of the same size and shape as the plats 35 are shown in Figs. 1, 24 and 25. The movable plats are mottled or otherwise distinguishably designated on one side to represent mountainous terrain and crosshatched on the opposite side to represent an industrial site. As subsequently described, the use of the movable plats 39 is agreed to by the players before the game begins.

The sea tract 32 consists of a plurality of substantially square zones 41 arranged in checkerboard relation in longitudinal and transverse alignment. The zones adjacent to the land tract are of slightly modified shape to tit the edge of the land tract and provide convenient movement between the tracts of certain playing pieces qualified to accomplish such movement. Longitudinally and transversely adjacent zones are of distinguishable color or shading and the diagonally adjacent zones of the same color or shading.

In addition to the plats 35, the land tract 31 also includes a pair of seaport plats 43 at opposite sides of ltract 32 and a seaport constituted by each plat and the portion of the sea tract immediately adjacent thereto.

A pair of spaced home bases 45 are indicated on areas 36 of the land tract preferably adjacent to opposite sides of the board 30. The home bases conveniently comprise three adjacent plats of a single land area and represent a starting point for the initiation of play by a player and a goal for an opponent. Unlike chess, wherein the game is terminated by checkmating a movable piece called the king, the game of the present invention is terminated by the occupation of either an opponents home base or seaport in a manner subsequently particularized.

As an attribute of modern warefare, a portion of the channel 37 in a predetermined position, as at 46, is designated as a blockade area and four mutually adjacent zones 47 in the sea tract designated as blockade areas for nautical playing pieces. The four sea blockade zones 47 are preferably edgewardly extended from the other zones of the sea tract to provide defense possibilities and an island area 48 including a hexagonal assemblage of land plats 35, as previously described is located adjacent to the edge of the sea zones 41 coterminous with the sea blockade zones 47 as shown in Figs. l and 3.

By extending the sea blockade zones 47 endwardly or longitudinally of the board 30 from the sea tract 32 and substantially centered transversely of the board, playing convenience is facilitated and a pair of rectangular spaces 49 made available at opposite sides thereof. The spaces 49 provide convenient location of a budget accounting area. Each space provides a plurality of paraliel rows of aligned bores 50. Budget expenditures are tabulated by the insertion of a pcg 51 in a bore designating total expenditures made during the game by each player. It is preferable to provide ten bores in each line indicative of ten purchase units which consistent with modern warfare expenditures may each represent ten billion dollars thus making available to each player a total budget of three hundred billion dollars for the contest.

Playing pieces The simplest and perhaps most important movable playing piece of the game of the instant invention is the personnel playing piece 55 illustrated in Fig. 4 representative of a unit of manpower Whether employed as soldiers, sailors, marines or civilians. For descriptive convenience these playing pieces are referred to herein as manpower units. structurally, the manpower units 55 each consist of an equilateral triangular bottom portion 56 of sheet material which is of the same or smaller in size than the plats 35. Centrally of the bottom portion a post 57 is integrally upwardly extended for convenience in manipulation and association with othery subsequently described playing pieces.

A plurality of light tank or minor mechanized unit playing pieces 60 of the form illustrated in Fig. 6 is provided. These pieces each consist of a bottom portion 61 having a length greater than the length of a side of a plat 35 and less than twice such length. The bottom portions 61 are adapted to rest upon pairs ot' adjacent plats of the land tract 31 as shown in Fig. 7 and have opposite end portions which are pointed to correspond to the opposite angles of the adjacent triangular plats. It will subsequently be seen that the end portions of the bottom portions of various playing pieces suggest the tract of the board on which they are employed. The edges of the pointed ends of the bottom portion 61 are preferably in substantially 60 angular relation to conform to the 60 corners of the plats 35. A body 62 of a form suggestive of an army tank is rigidly mounted longitudinally of the base 61 and serves both to identify the piece as a light tank as well as to provide convenient grasp for movement.

A plurality of heavy tank or major mechanized unit playing pieces 65 is provided of the form shown in Fig. 8. The heavy tanks each have bottom portions 66 of the size and shape of the bases 61 of the light tanks 60 and are positioned on pairs of adjacent plats, as shown in Fig. 9. An elongated bifurcated plate 68 is mounted on the bottom portion 66 in elevational spaced relation thereto as on a spacingV block 6 9. The heavy tanks are adapted to receive as many as two manpower units 55 with the bottoms 56 thereof -slidably received between the plate. 68 and the bottom portion 66 with the posts 57 upwardly extended between the bifurcated. portions of the plate. Iuasmuch as the heavyy tank pieces are regarded as immovable unless occupied by at least one manpower unit, it will be apparent that the heavy tank is not able to function except when the post 57 of one or more army pieces is upwardly extended therefrom providing grasping convenience for manipulation.

A plurality of cargo ship playing pieces 7,2 of the form i opposite corners t mounted longitudinally thereon in parallel spaced relation and of a silhouette suggestive of the superstructure of a ship, as shown. The cargo ship pieces move only diagonally on the zones v41 thus both ends of the hull portions thereof are pointed to tit the corners of the zones.

A minor or light fighting ship playing piece is -illusstrated at 78 in Fig. 12 and a pluralityl thereof made available for each player. This piece has an elongated hull 79 and an upwardly extended transversely disposed inverted 'V-shaped superstructure '80. They minor fighting ship pieces are of a length less than the length of a side of the zones 41 so as to be positionable within a single zone either longitudinally, transversely or diagonally of the board. `Inasmuch as the minor fighting ship vpieces :are movable longitudinally, transversely and diagonally, one end ofthe hull portion is provided with a "90 point suggestive of movement diagonally of the square .sea zones and the opposite end thereof squared, as shown, suggestive of movement `across any .side of the square zones.

A `major yor heavy `fighting :ship playing piece is shown in Fig. 14. This piece is adapted tto rest on pairs of `adjacent zones, llongitudinally or transversely lof the board only, and is Vmovable only `llong-itudinally or :transversely of the board. It will be noted that .consistent with the provision of bottom portions and 'hulls of the playing pieces suggestive of each piecefs Vplaying area and .direction of movement, each of the major ship pieces is provided with va substantially rectangular hull 8.4 of ua 4length greater than the side of a zone `but less `than twice that "dimension Aand has squared Aopposite -end portions. l

An erect transversely disposed 'inverted V- shaped -super- Struct-,ure -85 yis upwardly extended from .each hull por- 'tion 84.

The manpower units 55, light tanks i.69, fcango ,ships 72, and aircraft 93 are divided into sets which are lgiven distinguishing color or :other lconvenient identifying desi gnation so that opponents may readily distinguish between their pieces. inasmuch -as the fheavy .tanks V65p, theminor fiighting yship pieces 78 .and the major fighting .Ship pieces 83 are inoperable unless occupied 'by a manpower .unit 455 they do not require distinguishing color by sets but lmay be given such color if desired. The .manpower units ycarried thereby impart set or player designatingcolor thereto.

Communication line pieces 87 .of a lengt-h Atwice .that of sa side .of a pla-t 35 are provided in the lform shown in Fig. -16 uwhich may be -titted between adjacent areas 36 of the land tract 31. :Each .of the .communication pieces has two integral portions in 120 -angular relation .and is provided with ,pointed oppositely .extended ends .and a notched juncture of the lportions for convenience 4in .assembling a vplurality .of `such pieces -in .interconnected lielation .between .the areas.

A .plurality `of base playing .pieces .89 of sheet .material of the same Vsize and shape as the areas 36 is pro,- vided. When .an .area `3.6 is .completely .surrounded by communication lines .8.7 and each plat 35 thereof .occupied .by arnanpower ,unit 5.5, a .base ,may .be ypurchased -bya .player .andsuperimposed .on the area, ,as shown in Eig. 19, toattain certain playing advantages.

. A .movable sea .base 9.0 .is shown in Eig. ,20 .consisting .cfa hexagonal .member .of sheet vmaterial of .the .same size and .shape `as the land base VK89 but having .a p air of elongated, ltransversely aligned slots '9;1 .formed therein in tdiametric .relation to .the piece. The sea .base iis Ein- 'operable except when combined with two minor fighting sis ship pieces 78 and accompanied by 'a thi'rdas an escort. The base and the ships are combined as shown in Fig. 2i by arranging a pair of the ships in parallel relation on a single zone and itting the base downwardly over the superstructures 62 thereof which extend upwardly through the sea base and support the same in elevatedposition. The combined sea vbase and minor fighting ship lpieces 78 simulate an aircraft carrier in the game, Kwhich accord.- ing to the rulesv subsequently discussed, must be accom!- panied by a minor lighting ship piece 7.8 as an escort yto be movable. Aircraft rpieces 93 .are operable from the land. .bases 89 to attack any adjacent land area 36 to destroy .all enemy Pieces thereon and are operable from any sea base 9,0' to sea zones in any direction from the zone on which its combined fighting ship pieces 78 are rested. The aircraft pieces may be of any yconvenient construe.- tion and preferably are of aform .Suggestiyeof 4an airplane.; I-n order to impart terrain `probitlns t0 the game ,0f the present invention', a plurality of optionally employed vremovable plats 39 are provided of a lsize and `shape identical -to that A,of the plais @ne side of each of the movable plats is mottled or otherwise marked to sig,.- nify mountainous terrain and the opposite side thereof cross-hatched or otherwise identified -to represent :an lindustrial site.

.When the removable plat-s 39 are employed to indicate mountainous terrain, the contestants agree before the start of .the game .as Ito the loca-tion thereof. inasmuch as the plats 439 when positioned with their mottled side .up cannot be crossed by .either light tanks 60- or heavy tanks 6 5, mountainous terrain may possess defensive V,siga nicance. It .also .is agreed .preliminary jto the start l`of .the game, `industrial sites are tobe indicated by posi.- .tioningone or more Vof the plats 39 with .its crossfhatched side upwardly disposed. When yindustrial sites are util..- `ized, the players agree in .advance as to .the value thereof, any value from teu .to 011e hundred billion dollars yusually being .considered appropriate. Such .industrial .sitesamay .be `captured .by a player by .m ving a playing piece .onto a .plat .3 5 .occupied :by ,the plat 3,9.l1avn`g its. cross-hatched side upward. The .capturing player :receives e budget .credit .equal .to the value ,of .the .industrial ...site agreed upon :and may use .the industrial. site as .an additional home .base insofar as the initial locating .of purchased land playing .pmcesis concerned. For example, .a player .owning .an industrial Ysite may initially position manpower units .light tanks n60., v.and .heavy Atanks .6.5, that .are purchased, .on .the industrial .site rather than .the home .base givingthe owner thereof an .advantage in .the 4.dispose tion ,of 'his forces. `Once positioned, the plats 39 are Astationary until .the game is completed- Ouce .an ,industrial .site .is captured it has no .further budgetary .advantage but continues .to `provide .the .described ,advantage for .its .owner as anadditonal position .ofinitial loeation for urchased land pieces. If the opponent `succeeds lin Ac ap ring the .industrial .site from .the .Original captar. he iQCQiVLs no budgetary benefit but can use kthe industrial site asahome .base in initially .locating purchased rlaad pistes.-

Representative .of .tnal- .stability .and industrial and scientific development, a stuberbnmb playing piece .9.6 .is provided., as shown-.in `Fig .2,7- The .bomb piece cm1- ,sists of an annular periphery .9.7.1having a pair of right aggularlyrlaled, diametrical .cross bars 9.85 The bomb annot .be purchased until .i.ts.pur.chas.e.r .has established xthree land or .Sea .bases `-89 or .90.- .The bomb .mustbri delivered by .air and cannot be .employed .in any region covered by, o r acessblb t0. .the opponents aircraft, .the theory being that the .enemy planes .could intercept .and down the plane .Carrying .the .Superbomb- If two .purchasing ,units are paid for the superbom'b its destructive area is that encompassed by .theinner periphery 0f .the annularporton 97. This Ais analogous to an atom bomb. If five units are paidkfor lthe superbomb, its destructive area is lthat .defined by the outer periphery of the.`annular member. As will subsequently ,become apparent, any time Aan aircraft piece 93 is employed in the'game 'it is expended 'b y a single move. `Sin'1ilarlythe superbomb piece is expended `by its single instance of employment. To employ the superbombfan elected aircraft carrying piece 93 is moved to a .selected destination --within ritfs range on either theland tract 31 or ,the hsea tract 32. The destination becomes the vcenter ofthe super-bomb which is then placed 'thereon and renders inoperable all opponent playing pieces `Within its area of destructive eifect. 'The -superbomb, itst-ransportingtaircraft, and tall 4l destroyed playing pieces are then removed from the board 30.

Operation The physical apparatus of the game of the present invention having been described. attention is directed to the method of utilizing the described board 30 and playing pieces. The usual game is played with two participants or teams each having thirty purchasing units available to it, representative of a budget of three hundred billion dollars. The board represents land and sea combat areas across which the various movable pieces constituting weapons of war are manipulated. The playing pieces may be moved in any direction characteristic of pieces of their type and destroy opponent playing pieces by occupying the plat or plats 35, or zone or zones 41 on which the opponents piece is rested. Unlike most games. the game of the present invention permits moving any or all of the land pieces a single step, moving any or all of the sea pieces a single step, or moving any or all of the aircraft units a single step, or the purchase of pieces in units of ten billion dollars or less (represented by a single bore 50) and by indicating the purchase on the budget each play. The players. of course, play by turn.

lt is essential to participation in the game that the players have in mind the purchase price and purchase conditions for each of the pieces as well as their characteristic positioning and movements. if movement thereof is permitted. The manpower units cost two billion dollars or five may be purchased for one unit. The manpower unit moves to any of the three plats 35 adiacent to the plat on which it is rested including an adiacent plat across a communication line channel as indicated in dashed line in Fig. 5. The manpower units may be moved from the land tract onto either the minor fightinar ship pieces 78 or maior fighting ship pieces 33 from the Seaports. In moving such combined pieces, the transporting pieces with their manpower unit or units are considered as a single piece for movement purposes.

Each minor mechanized piece or light tank 60 costs eight billion dollars. three are available to each player. and each is positionable on adiacent pairs of plats 35. Each moves a distance of one plat in any direction. as shown in Fig. 7, but never bridges a communication channel 37 to cross a channel. movement of actually two plats being authorized in the manner shown. This piece may be moved from a given position into either of two adiacent positions on its own area 36 or across an adiacent channel to either of two positions on either of two adiacent areas 36. Since it occupies two plats it can only be destroyed by an opponent simultaneously occupying both of its plats. lt will be obvious that it is possible for the minor mechanized piece to take two opposing army pieces in a single move. This piece cannot move onto mountainous terrain represented by the mottled sides of the removable plats 39.

The maior mechanized unit pieces or heavy tanks 65 cost eight billion dollars when empty or sixteen billion dollars when loaded with two manpower units 55. It will be apparent that a financial penalty is provided for purchasing a maior mechanized piece with two manpower units at a single play. If the player waits one turn after the purchase of such a piece he may add the two manpower units for only an additional four billion dollars. The heavy tanks can be purchased only after one base 89 is set up. It cannot be moved unless occupied by at least one manpower unit 55 and may receive two manpower units for unitary movement across the land tract. The heavy tanks 65 move in the same manner as the light tanks 60 .and destroy and are destroyed in the same manner as the light tanks. lt is to be borne in mind, however, that the heavy tanks bear one or two manpower units 55 which may dismount and move as part of the move of their respective transporting tank.

There are two cargo ship pieces 72 available to each player each of which may be purchased for six billion dollars. The cargo ship pieces move only diagonally and thus are always on the same color zones 41. They are emblematic of the merchant marine and have as a roost significant function the occupying of the two zones 47 of its respective color designated as blockade zones as a result of which all of the purchase prices for all of the playing pieces are doubled for the opponent. The

cargo ship pieces also can destroy minor fighting ship pieces of the Opponent if rested on diagonal zones. The

A8 cargo ship pieces move one zone at a time and are incapable of destroying any opponent major fighting ship pieces without assistance, inasmuch as such major iighting ships are never found on diagonally adjacent zones of the same color.

The minor fighting ship pieces 78 are movable one zone in any direction longitudinally, transversely, or diagonally of the sea tract 32. They each may carry a maximum load of two manpower units 55 and are immovable unless occupied by at least one such unit. They need not be given any set designating color. They each cost ten billion dollars and a total of only three are available. lt will be obvious that a player may gain naval superiority by exhausting the available supply of fighting ships. An embarking or disembarking move of a manpower unit 55 from a ship is considered a land movement and may not be made at the same time a naval movement is made.

There are three major fighting ship pieces 83 which need be given no set designating color and each of which has a purchase price of twenty billion dollars. It is also possible for a player to gain naval superiority by monopolizing the available major fighting ship pieces. These pieces occupy two zones at a time and must always be positioned either longitudinally or transversely of the board 3), as shown in Fig. l5.

The manner of movement of the major fighting ships 83 is unusual in game board play but readily understood by reference to Fig. l5. The major fighting ship shown at 83A in full line may be moved in a single play to cover any pair of laterally or longitudinally adjacent zones 4l. both of which are adiacent to either of the pair of zones initially occupied by the major fighting ship. Thus, the major fighting ship 83A can be moved to any one of the positions shown in dashed line in Fig. l5 in a single move and may thus attack and render inoperable the maior fighting ship indicated at 83B. Considerable interest is added to the game by the fact that ship 83A can attack the ship 83B and yet ship 83A is not subject to attack by ship 83B. This is readily understood when it is observed that both of the zones 41 on which ship 83B is rested are of course adjacent to each other and both are adjacent to one of the zones on which ship 83A is rested. Considering the situation from the standpoint of ship 33B, however, a different condition prevails. Although of course the two zones on which ship 83A is rested are adiacent, only one thereof is adiacent to the ship 83B. The significance of the relative positions of the opponents heavy fighting ships is further suggestive of naval warfare and may suggest the well known maneuver of crossing the T. Assuming the positions shown in Fig. 15, ship 83B in a single move could only overcome ship 83A with the assistance of another sea playing piece which could concurrently attack the zone on which ship 83A is rested not accessible to ship 83B in a single play.

The maior fighting ships 83 may destroy two opponent light fighting ships at a single move but cannot be destroyed unless both of the zones on which it is rested are occupied in a single play by the opponent. The major fighting ship pieces may carry a maximum load of three manpower units 55 or one minor mechanized unit 6() and one manpower unit 55 for unitary movement across the sea tract 32. It is permissible for all occupying pieces to disembark from a fighting ship piece but such a piece cannot be moved until reoccupied. Disembarking is considered a land move and may be accomplished at the sea ports, at the island, and along the edge of the land tract 3l.. lt is to be observed, however, that certain F? the zones 41 next to the land tract exclude heavy ghting ship occupancy. This is analogous to reefs and Shoals. Manpower units 55 cannot occupy empty enemy ships for purposes of capture except when such unoccupied ship is in the enemy seaport and then such occupancy constitutes occupancy of the seaport and wins the game.

Unlimited communication line pieces 37 are available for purchase at four billion dollars apiece. It is designed to facilitate communications by expediting movement of other pieces and can only be purchased and installed when, as shown in Fig. 17, the position which it is to assume has all of the plats 35 adjacent thereto occupied by manpower units 55. In the case of a communication line to be laid by the seaport, only the two or three plats adjacent to its intended position need be occupied by manpower units. Further, a communication line may be laid arosm 'in front of the home base of either power units stationed home base.

munication line simultaneously, the manpower units are set iirst in the position required, as indicated in Fig. 7 and the communication line placed in its channel as a part of the same play. Thereafter any land piece on a plat adjacent to the communication line, or a communication line connected thereto may be moved in a single play to any plat which is also adjacent to the communication line or line connected thereto. It is to be observed however, that a plat is adjacentto the communication line only when one of its sides is contiguous therewith and not when simply touching the communication line at a corner'. The communication line is stationary but may be taken by an opponent for removal from the board after which it may be repurchased and relocated, as desired.

An opponents communication line 87 can be destroyed and removed from the board by either a manpower unit or a mechanized unit 60 or 65 placed on a triangle adjacent to that communication line. Four manpower units are required to lay a communication line but only 'one is required to destroy it.

A player who succeeds in setting .up a communication line 87 to the edge of the board over the portion of the channel 37 marked blockade sets up a land blockade and doubles the purchase price of all of his opponents pieces.V Communication lines must be started from the home bases 45 and must be laid in correct position from the iirst or a player may come to the point of laying the blockadeY line and be forced to lay a portion of it 'on the opponents .side of the board.

If the communication line to the blockade point is cut even though the line ,over the blockade is reached `on thel board the blockadeis broken. The 4communication line is not removed from the board until it is attached but it does not functon as a line further than its own 'continuous length.

en an opposing piece attacks a plat 35 adjacent .to abase '89, the communication line to. which 'that plat is adjacent is removed fromy the board. If on the next move the attacking piece is able to move onto the base the base remains on the board but the remaining communication lines to which it is adjacent .are removed.

A total of five unmarked land bases 89 'are available and any player may purchase as lmany as his financial resources permit. A base may be purchased for .twenty billion dollars and put down on any hexagonal area 36,

each plat 35 of which is occupied by a manpower unit 55 .and which is surroundedby a communication line 87. The neutral island area 4'8 is provided with two neutral `'manpower units 55 which become the propertyV of vthe thereon. A base may be Apurchased and located on the island when four manpower units 55 are landed there by a player. The two neutral manpower units already on the island with the four landed provide the six reqlirst player to capturethe island and toplace a Vbase uisite for base installation. `No circumscribing communif cation line is required as a Aprerequisite to the installation of a base on the island. Y

The base 89 is purchased and set in position during a single play. One `manpower unit 55 must remain on the base or `the base i's inoperable. 'The other units .may remain on the base ror they may zbe placed on platsuadjacent 'to any 'of the surrounding communication lines or communication .lines connected thereto. In the case of the island, `the manpower units '55 may be left on the island or reembarked on `their ships., as desired. The movement .of manpower units. at the Itime of -purchase of `a base ris lpartof thepurchase play and the `manpcwer'units may be moved again 'at the next play.

Ain area covered vby a base89 is, for gpurp'oses o'fmovement, equivalent to a communication line`87. Thus, any piece on a base may be Amoved in one play 'to any ,plat adjacent vto vthe base or adjacent to connecting communication lines. The base .may also be used effectively .for storage purposes so as tolgain mobility for other pieces on `the 'field of play. A base fand-'an aircraft piece 93 may be purchased at the same time.

The location of a `base 89 is important .because of the increased air range when two `or three vbases are vrestabl'ished. If two bases 'are held, 'the range lofa'i1jc1:aft`93 on those bases is doubled =on 1a 'line extending between 'and beyond fthos'e bases. If -a land base fand an island manpower basev are held, aircraft thereon cover every sea z'one 41 a part-of which falls between lines drawn between corresponding edges of the two bases. Visual reference readily will establish th' area. Aircraft located at either base may make flights from the other. Once a base is established it is never removed from the board but if an enemy land piece is moved upon it or if an opponents aircraft can fly to it when there is no opposing aircraft stationed on it it is captured. When an opposing piece moves onto a base 89 all communication lines 87 touching the base are removed. The captured base cannot be utilized as an air base unless the capturing player is able to get his communication lines to it. However, any playing piece on a base, except aircraft, can be moved to, and thus threatens, all plats 35 adjacent thereto.

The aircraft pieces 93 are purchased at a cost of four billionY dollars and each player has four aircraft potentially available to him. Each aircraft can be considered to represent an air force.

Aircraft 93 may be purchased and put into position on a base 89 concurrently with `a base purchase or at a subsequent time. The maximum number of aircraft per mitted on any base is equalto the total number of bases owned by the player possessing the bases. An `aircraft 93 is movable from its base to any adjacent land area 36 and if the base is adjacent to the sea tract 32, to the two zones 41 nearest the base. An aircraft based on the island controls the ten zones immediately adjacent thereto.

The aircraft is the only piece which is automatically lost as the result of a single use. It will therefore be apparent that aircraft are not moved from the base except to take a piece or pieces greater than its value or for emergency strategic reasons.

Two movable sea bases 90 are available to each player at a costof thirty billion dollars apiece. No sea base can lbe purchased until after one 'land base is set up and `.until -at least three .ships including at least two `minor lighting ships 78 are properly arranged on the board, as previously described. The two minor or light fighting ships are set side by side on a single Vzone 4i adjacent to .the contiguous edge of the land tract 31, representing a shoreline, and thesthird ship which may either 4or -a major fighting ship is stationed on an adjacent zone. in .such condition a sea base 90 may .be purchased and set over the Isupers'tructures 85 of the two minor lighting ships which rest on the single zone. So long as the two ships 'on wh-ich the base '9.0 is rested and the escort ship remain adjacent, the entire unit .operates asa ,carrier task force. and .is moved unitaril one zone in any direction. As long as .the escort ship stays with the sea (base 9'0 it 'moves las the 'sea vbase is moved. If the tender leaves the sea base, the sea base cannot be moved but it may still operate as a stationary base in the sea.

Aircraft 93 may be purchased at the same time as the sea '-base l9'0 and yin a number equal to the total number of bases Apossessed by the purchaser after purchase of the sea base. Aircraft aboard the sea base '90 can strike a 'distance 'of two zones 41 in any direction from 1the 'hase square on which vthe two minor ighting ships 78 rest the base. It is permitted, and frequently 'be a minor in supporting desirable when low 'in budget reserve, to .discard .the .sea base :by lifting :it off the minor lighting ships and removing it from vthe board, without penalty. The minor iightngships :are concurrently moved to adjacent zones and thereafter 'operated individually.

One Iland ibase 89 must be in operation before a sea base 193V can be 'set 4up or 1before a heavy ltank or major mechanized unit 65 lcan :be purchased. When two .bases 9'0 andor 89 are setup .two aircraft may be bought for each 'base and the range lof each aircraft is doubled along a line extending between and :beyond the bases. The effective vrange 'of any aircraft includes any plat 35 or zone 41 .'the 'major vpart of which 'falls .between straight lines extended between `and .beyond the outside edges of the basesandwithin Jtwo areas 36 or two zones 41 from its base..

When ithree "bases "90 v'and/or `89 are set up, three aircraft lmay be 'purchased for .each base. inasmuch .as all aircraft are Lmovable on a singleplay a tremendous destructive'forcecanbe thus .generated l'Superbonribs 96 represent .a .culmination of industrial and scientiiic development and cannot be purchased until a'tota'l of three land Iandsea bases 89 and '90 are estab- The `bomb can lbe purchased play after the three bases are lished by "the jpurchaser. only aspar't 'of a `purchase set up. The bomb must be delievered by an aircraft 93 and it cannot be utilized in any area covered by an enemys aircraft. When the superbomb is to be used as an atom bomb having a destructive zone designated by the inner periphery of the annulus 97 the purchase price is twenty billion dollars. When it is to be utilized as a hydrogen bomb having a destructive area defined by the outer periphery of the annulus 97, the purchase price is 50 billion dollars.

The center of the superbomb 96 is in either case located on any selected part of a plat 35 or zone 41 which is within range of any aircraft from any of the players bases 9@ and/ or S9 and not within range of the enemys aircraft. All pieces within the periphery of destruction are rendered inoperable and removed from the board. If the edge of a base is within the destructive zone, the base remains, but everything on it is removed from the board. lf any part of a communication line 87 is within the destructive area the entire line is removed, but if only a plat 35 adjacent to the line is within the destructive area the line is not removed. lf any portion of any plat is included within the effective periphery of the bomb, any piece thereon is removed and if any portion of a zone is within such periphery any ship on that zone even including a major ship is removed. If any player acquires four bases the range of his aircraft 96 is unlimited.

If a players piece can move onto an opponents base 89 or 9) all pieces on that base are removed and all communication lines adjacent to the base likewise removed. The base remains, but cannot be utilized as an air base by the capturing player until his communication line is extended to it. If an aircraft of a player can move onto an enemy base occupied by a iiyable aircraft, only the occupying plane is removed. A flyable aircraft is defined as a plane belonging to a player whose financial reserve is adequate to replace the aircraft when it is used and which aircraft is stationed on a base occupied by a manpower unit 55, the theory being that a yable aircraft can defend its base.

If two aircraft 93 can fiy to an enemy base 89 or 90 occupied by a single aircraft or a single aircraft can fly to a base on which there is no aircraft the base is captured. If an aircraft can attack the portion of a major fighting ship 78 rested on a single zone 41 while another piece attacks the portion of the ship rested on the adjacent zone, the ship is destroyed by the aircraft move and removed from the board.

Preliminary to initiation of play, the players agree as to the employment of the plats 39 to indicate mountainous terrain or an industrial site, and if employed as an industrial site, the value thereof which is to accrue to the player capturing the site.

By mutual agreement, the plats 39 employed as industrial sites may be utilized in a somewhat different manner than that described to add interest to the game, par ticularly when the game is played by three contestants. In the modified use of the industrial sites, they are purchased for an agreed consideration, such as forty billion dollars. When an industrial site is thus obtained, its owner places it at the seaport and transports the industrial site therefrom on successive plays by means of the cargo ship playing pieces 72. The spaced plates 74 slidably receive the plats`39 therebetween for unitary movement with the transporting cargo ship to a destination along the edge of the land tract 31 or to the island area 48. At the desired destination, the industrial site is disembarked from its cargo ship and superimposed on a selected plat 35 subsequent to which it constitutes a second home base for the owner insofar as the locating of purchased land playing pieces is concerned. This mobile use of the industrial sites is analogous to advance bases providing construction and assembling facilities in modern warfar Many modified uses of the mobile industrial sites will occur to skillful players of the subject game.

In starting the game, the players determine which is to have the initial play and the players play alternately thereafter. The first play of each player is of course the purchase of playing pieces and the indication of the expended portion of the budget by positioning his peg 51 in the appropriate bores 50 indicative of purchase units of ten billion dollars or less. Subsequent plays consist of either a purchase, moving any or all land pieces, movmg any or all sea pieces, or moving aircraft. All purchased land pieces; not including communication lines y87, land bases 89, aircraft 93 or superbombs 96; are first placed on the purchasers home base and subsequently moved therefrom as previously described. All sea pieces purchased; with the exception of sea bases 90, aircraft 93, and superbombs 96 are initially located at the purchasers seaport 43. The method of purchase and loca tion of the communication lines 87, land bases 89, sea bases 90, aircraft 93, and superbombs 96 has been previously described.

When a player succeeds in locating both of his cargo ships 72 on a pair of the diagonally adjacent blockade zones 47, his opponents purchase prices are automatically doubled. The same result is attained by a players extension of a communication line 87 from his home base to the land blockade portion 46 of the channel 37. When a player succeeds in achieving both a land and a sea blockade, his opponents purchase prices are quadrupled unless the opponent has succeeded in obtaining a blockade of his own in which event his prices are only doubled. When each of the competitors have the same number of blockades their effects cancel each other and the original purchase prices are in effect.

The players maneuver the playing pieces individually, or all land pieces concurrently, or all sea pieces concurrently, or all aircraft concurrently, or combined playing pieces such as the major mechanized unit 65 occupied by one or two manpower units 55; minor fighting ships occupied by one or two manpower units; major fighting ships 78 occupied by one, two or three manpower units; a pair of minor fighting ships 78 accompanied by an escort fighting ship and bearing a seabase 90, and the like so as to overcome the opponent or penetrate his defenses to achieve victory by occupying his home base 45, or seaport 43.

To accommodate three players, one thereof may be given the island area 48 as a home base. The players play successively by turn as before and the game is completed in essentially the same way except that when one of the players captures an opponents home base 45 or seaport 43, the captor acquires the assets of the defeated player for use in continuing to wage warfare on the remaining p ayer.

If it is desired to handicap competitors whose abilities are unequal, this can readily be accomplished by depriving the better player of a portion of his initial budget. It will be apparent that players skilled in the game may make further modifications in the playing pieces employed and rules for conduct of the game without departing from the spirit and the scope of the present invention.

Although the invention has been herein shown and described in what is conceived to be the most practical and preferred embodiment, it is recognized that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the invention, which is not to be limited to the details disclosed herein but is to be accorded the full scope of the claims so as to embrace any and all equivalent devices and apparatus.

Having described my invention, whatI claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A game apparatus comprising a board constituting a playing field having tracts each divided into portions of predetermined geometrc shape and ordered arrangement unique to their respective tracts, there being a pair of spaced bases designated within one of the tracts each constituting a starting point for initiation of play by one player and a goal for an opponent; a plurality of minor playing pieces individual to each of the tracts each having bottom portions in part similar in shape to the divisions of their respective tracts to identify their regions of play; a plurality of major playing pieces individual to each of the tracts having bottom portions in part similar in shape to pairs of adiacent divisions of their respective tracts, the major playing pieces of both of the tracts having means thereon for receiving a plurality of minor playing pieces from one of the tracts for unitary movement therewith over their respective tracts.

2. A game apparatus comprising a board constituting a playing field having visually distinguishable adjacent portions designated as land and sea tracts respectively, the land tract including a plurality of polygonal plats grouped together into larger discrete polygonal areas and the sea tract comprising a plurality of zones arranged in a checkerboard pattern, the sea tract being contiguous with the land tract, a pair of spaced home bases 13 being designated en the land trctech 'constituting a starting point for a player and a 'goal for an opponent; plurality of nianpovver unit playingpieees having bases rested on individual plats and similar in shape to said plats for niovenent about on said'plts a plurality of minor ship playing pieces having bases rested on individual Zones and similar in shapeuto said 'zones for movenient abouton said fzones, the minor ship playing pieees being provided 'vl/ith IlanS f'll rvably reiv. g power unit playing pieees for unitary niovein 4nt therewith. on the sea tract; a plurality of mechanized unit playing pieces having bases individually rested on pairs of adjacent plats and similar inV ape 'to the Ap ailsjif plats for ruoveinerltA about on 'said ts', andy a vplurality or niajor ship playing 'pieces having bases individually irested onpairs of the adjacent Zones 'and similar in shape to the pairs of iones for movement about on said zones, said major Ship playing pieces being receiving removably to receive a plurality of manpower lunit playing pieces fol' unitary movement therewith on the Seal tract.

3, A game apparatus comprising ya board constituting a playing eld having visually 'distinguishabler adjacent portions defined as land and sea tracts respectively, "the land tract includng a plurality of triangular plats vgrouped in discrete hexagonal and tracto-hexagonal areas, and the sea tract comprising a plurality of substantially square Zones arranged in a checlerb'oard pattern, the sea tract being contiguous with the laud `t'rac't and the 'zones ofthe sjea tract adjacent 'to the land tract being Y'of modiied shape to tit `the edgeof the land tract, a pair 'of spaced horne bases being 'designated on the land tract each constituting 'a starting point for a player and the `goal for his opponent; a 'plurality lof manpower 'unit playing pieces having basesl rested on individual plats and similar in shape to said plats for movement, aonnd foilV the plats of the land tract; a plurality "of light ship playingpieces having bases rested 'on individual zones and similar in shape to said zones for movement around lon the -zones o fx the sea tract, th'elight ship playing 'pieces being piovided 'with meansfo'r removably receiving manpower unit playing pieces 'for unitary 'movement therewith jabou't on the sea tract; a plurality of mechanized unit playing pieces having bases `individually res/ted on .pairsbof adjacent 'plats and 'similar in shape "to the pairs of plats for movement aroundr on pairs or plats of the land tract; and a plurality of ,heavy ship playing pieces having bases individually rested on pairs of the adjacent zones `and similar in shape to the pairs of zones for" yrr'lverne'nt around on pairs of zones of the s ea tract, said heavy ship playing pieces being provided with 'means for removably receiving a plurality of manpower unit playing pieces for unitary movement therewithvon `the sea tract.

4. A simulated war game apparatus wherein lenemy playing pieces are rendered'inopeiable by movement of i attaching playingV pieces intothe same 'position and vicp tori attained by occupancy by attacking playing pieces at 'one of a plurality of predetermined positions 'on va playing eld designated as opponents home base 'and sea port, respectively, comprising a board having a 'substantiallypilat' `surface 'constituting a playing vfield having visually distinguishable adjacent portions designated as land and sea tracts respectively, the land tract including a plurality of equilateral triangular plats grouped in discrete hexagonal and tracto-hexagonal areas each consisting of a plurality of laterally adjacent triangular plats each of Which has a corner contiguous with a corner of every other plat of its respective area, the adjacent plats of each area being of distinguishable color, diametrically opposite plats of each area being of the same color and adjacent plats of adjacent areas being of the same color, each of said areas being raised from the surface of said board and being arranged in adjacent spaced relation forming a channel therebetween, and the sea tract comprising a checkerboard pattern of substantially square zones in longitudinal and transverse alignment, the longitudinally and transversely adjacent zones being of distinguishable color and the diagonally adjacent zones being of the same color, the sea tract being contiguous with the land tract and the zones of the sea tract adjacent to the land tract being of modified shape to fit the edge of the land tract, there being a pair of home bases designated on spaced areas of the land tract, a pair of sea ports designated on spaced areas of the land tract adjacent to the sea tract in spaced relation to the home bases and blockade regions designated 14 on both the land and the' sea'tracts; a plurality of coniminication members releasably fitted to the channels and of a length substantially twice the length of a side of the triangular plats; manpower unit playing pieces having equilateral triangular bases positioned on the plats; for movement about on the plats light mechanized unit playing pieces individually positioned on ,adjacent pairs of plats having elongated bases of a length in excess of vthe sides of theplats and opposite ends angulated to nt the CS O f thel tringla' I'Jll's f' 'Ivlht about on pairs or plats; heavy mechanized unit playing pieces provided 'vl/ith ''caiis f cl'esblly receiving and tnS- porting therewith tvvo manpower units and having a base of the `saine shape as the light mechanized unit playing pieces for movement in the same manner; cargo ship playing pieces positioned diagonally on individualzohes of the sea tractA having elongated bases of a length gfcr than thc longitudinal ail'd transverse dimensions "of the zones and less than 'the diagonal dimension of the zones and opposite ends angulated to lit diagonal corners of the Zones, said cargo ship playing fpieces having upwardly extended superstructures )slotted longitudinally of their bases; 'said members being receivable by the slotted superstructure kand movable 'unitaiily 'therewith during playingmanipulaton for transporting purposes; light lighting ship playing pieces positioned on individual zones of the seaI tract having elongated bases' come prising means to hold two manpower unit playing pieces and upwardly extended superstrnetures, said bases leach having 'a substantially square 'end and an opposite 'end angul'atedto 'ht the corners of 'the fzones, heavy ghte ing 'ship playingp'ieces positioned on individual pairs of adjacent 'Zones having elongated bases, and upwardly eitendedsuperstructures, 'said 'last bases 'comprising means to hold `'three manpower unit playing pieces Aand having vSflil'lfst'a'l lllly Sqll'e Opposite c nd pOIfillS, and n'eal'S for indicating purchase of playing pieces by players of the game, each of lthe playing pieces having predetermined purchase prices payable tovrender them available for use, each price Vof which is Vdoubledvby opponents occupancy of a blockade regionfwith a playing piece.

5. The `gaine 'apparatus yof claim 4 in which 'ahexgonal island area vof jgrouped triangular 'plats is provided ifn the sea tract aifo'rding the A"sa-me types of movement fthereacross as an area of the land tract.

"6, The game apparatusfof claim 4 in which 'a plurality of heavy mechanized `unit 'playing pieces are provided on the land vtract individually positioned Ion yadjacent pairs `of plats having elongated bases of a length inexcess 'or the `sides of vthe `plats and opposite 'ends `pointed to lit the/'corners ofAthe triangular plats, said playing pieces each having 'a bifurcated superstructure 'mounted injelevate'd spaced relation to its respective base adapted to receive ia plurality 'of virlanpower unit playing 'pieces thcbje'fWcnWth portions 4thereof 'eht'endc'd fllp'vvadly tlirah the bifurcated superstructure.

'7. The, game apparatus of 'claim '4A in 'which a circular superborr'lb playing lpiece is provided, 'available -for purchase by anyplaye'r 'after `ar.-quri'irg three hexagonal bases and 'which is-,m'ovable a 'Single time with a cornpanion aircraft playing piece from any of the bases to render inoperable all opponents playing pieces within an area defined thereby having as a center the position of movement of the companion aircraft playing piece, said superbomb playing piece comprising an annular rim portion and diametrically extending cross bars intersecting at the center of said rim, the inner and outer peripheries of said rim being respresentative of varying destructive power of said bomb.

8. The combination of ,claim 4 including removable triangular mountain designating members of the size and shape of the plats and being individually positionable thereon, said mountain designating members being receivable by the slotted superstructure of said cargo ship playing pieces and movable unitarily therewith during playing manipulation for transporting purposes.

9. The combination of claim 4 including hexagonal land bases removably fitted to the hexagonal areas of the land tract for use when such an area is surrounded by a players communication lines and each of the plats thereof occupied by the players manpower unit playing pieces, and aircraft playing pieces positionable on said land bases and movable to adjacent land areas for capturing purposes.

10. The combination of claim 4 including hexagonal sea bases removably mountable on pairs of said light fighting ship playing pieces by fitted engagement with the superstructure thereof and aircraft playing pieces positionable on said sea bases and movable to adjacent sea zones for capturing purposes.

l1. A simulated war game apparatus comprising a board having a substantially fiat surface and constituting a playing field, a portion of said field comprising a land tract, said tract comprising a plurality of separated and staggered hexagonal areas each of which consists of a plurality of triangular plats fitted into a hexagonal relationship, said areas being raised from the surface of the board and defining channels between, a pair of spaced home bases being designated on the land tract each constituting a starting point for a player and a goal for the opponent, a plurality of communication line pieces removably fitted to the channels and of a length substantially twice the length of a side or" the triangular plats, and simulated war playing pieces for movement about on the plats of said land tracts.

12. A simulated war game apparatus comprising a board having a substantially fiat surface and constituting a playing field, said playing field comprising both land and sea tracts, said land tract comprising a plurality of separated and staggered hexagonal and tracto-hexagonal areas each of which consists of a plurality of triangular plats fitted into a hexagonal or tracto-hexagonal relationship, said sea tract comprising a plurality of substantially square zones and arranged in checkerboard pattern, the sea tract being contiguous with the land tract and the zones of the sea tract adjacent to the land tract being of modified shape to fit the edge of the land tract, said areas and said zones being arranged on the board so that longitudinal diagonals through said hexagonal and tracto-hexagonal areas when extended form straight lines with the longitudinal sides of said zones, and simulated war playing pieces for movement about on each of said tracts, said straight lines forming guiding means for controlling movement of some of said pieces.

13. A simulated war game apparatus comprising a board having a substantially flat surface and constituting a playing field, said playing field comprising both land and sea tracts, said land tract comprising a plurality of separated and staggered hexagonal and tracto-hexagonal areas each of which consists of a plurality of triangular plats fitted into said hexagonal and tracto-hexagonal relationships, said sea tract comprising a plurality of substantially square zones in longitudinal and transverse alignment and arranged in checkerboard pattern, the sea tract being contiguous with the land tract and the zones of the sea tract adjacent to the land tract being of modified shape to fit the edge of the land tract, said areas being raised from the surface of the board and defining channels therebetween, a plurality of communication playing pieces being removably received in said channels, a pair of raised home bases at spaced positions at one end of said land tract each constituting a starting point for a player and a goal for his opponent, a pair of raised sea ports at spaced positions at the opposite end of said land tract each constituting a goal, said sea tract being coplanar with the surface of said board and having its said contiguous portion extending into said sea ports, a plurality of simulated war playing pieces each having a shape related to the shape of the plat or zone on which the piece is movable.

14. The combination of claim 13, wherein a raised island of a shape substantially similar to each of said hexagonal areas is positioned on said sea tract.

15. The combination of claim 13, wherein the adjacent plats of each area are of a distinguishable color, diametrically opposite plats of each area are of the same color and adjacent plats of adjacent areas are of the same color, and wherein the longitudinally and transversely adjacent Zones are of a distinguishable color and the diagonally adjacent zones are of the same color, said coloring comprising means for distinguishing the outlines of said plats and zones.

16. A simulated war game apparatus comprising a board having a substantially fiat surface and constituting a playing field, said playing field comprising both land and sea tracts, said land tracts comprising a plurality of separated and staggered hexagonal and tractohexagonal areas each of which consists of a plurality of triangular plats fitted into said hexagonal and fractohexagonal relationships, said sea tract comprising a plurality of substantially square zones arranged in checkerboard pattern, the sea tract being contiguous with the land tract and the zones of the sea tract adjacent to the land tract being of modified shape to fit the edge of the land tract, Said areas being raised from the surface of the board and defining channels therebetween, a plurality of communication playing pieces removably received in said channels, a pair of raised home bases at spaced positions at one end of said land tract each constituting a starting point for a player and a goal for his opponent, a pair of raised sea ports at spaced positions at opposite end of said land tract each constituting a goal, said sea tract being coplanar with the surface of said board and having its said contiguous portion extending into said sea ports, a plurality of simulated war playing pieces for movement about on the plats and zones on said tracts and each having a shape related to the shape of the plat or zone on which it is movable, and a financial budget indicating means at one end of said board comprising a plurality of holes and peg members for reception in said holes, each of said playing and communication pieces having a predetermined purchase price to be usable in the game, said pegs being indicative of the amount paid for such pieces.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,315,483 Edwards Sept` 9, 1919 2,282,128 Gubbins May 5, 1942 2,295,452 Deaton Sept. 8, 1942 2,307,609 Stenberg Jan. 5, 1943 2,313,303 Szatrow Mar. 9, 1943 2,342,899 Sand Feb. 29, 1944 2,400,644 Hoffman May 21, 1946 2,414,165 Paschal Jan. 14, 1947 2,450,829 Hayes Oct. 5, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1315483 *Dec 22, 1916Sep 9, 1919 Plano
US2282128 *Apr 22, 1940May 5, 1942James B GubbinsGame
US2295452 *May 19, 1941Sep 8, 1942Charles U DeatonGame apparatus
US2307609 *Dec 18, 1939Jan 5, 1943Stenberg Alvin GBoard game apparatus
US2313303 *Sep 12, 1940Mar 9, 1943Szatrow MikolajGame
US2342899 *Dec 24, 1940Feb 29, 1944Sands Jr Edward FGame
US2400644 *Jan 29, 1944May 21, 1946Hoffman BenjaminMilitary chess game
US2414165 *Jul 10, 1944Jan 14, 1947Paschal GuyGame piece
US2450829 *Nov 23, 1945Oct 5, 1948Haven Hayes CharlesCheckered game board
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3048404 *Aug 13, 1959Aug 7, 1962George S TebbsGame
US3638947 *Mar 2, 1970Feb 1, 1972Floyd W HardestyGeometric patterned board game
US4227696 *Nov 6, 1978Oct 14, 1980Irving SilvermanBoard game
US4614344 *Aug 5, 1982Sep 30, 1986Connor Patrick G OInterchangeable game board
US4688802 *Oct 10, 1984Aug 25, 1987Sandifer John WBoard game
US4828268 *Jun 4, 1981May 9, 1989Somerville Norman HGame board
US5082287 *Jul 30, 1990Jan 21, 1992Nwanna Dozie C BApparatus for a game
US5108109 *Jun 13, 1990Apr 28, 1992Leban Bruce PBoard game without a board
US5306017 *Oct 14, 1992Apr 26, 1994Huston & HustonCivil war chess
US5351965 *Sep 10, 1993Oct 4, 1994Telfer Stephen JApparatus for playing a board game
US5388837 *Jul 27, 1993Feb 14, 1995Hoffman; EmileGame of military strategy
US5609339 *Jul 17, 1996Mar 11, 1997Mahoney; Paul C.Board game
WO1994000205A1 *Jun 29, 1992Jan 6, 1994Jean Michel ReyStrategy game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/262, 273/284, 273/290
International ClassificationA63F3/00, A63F3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2003/00719, A63F3/00075
European ClassificationA63F3/00A8