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Publication numberUS2706616 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 19, 1955
Filing dateJan 12, 1951
Priority dateJan 12, 1951
Publication numberUS 2706616 A, US 2706616A, US-A-2706616, US2706616 A, US2706616A
InventorsOsmun Dean W
Original AssigneeOsmun Dean W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Conductor line jar
US 2706616 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3 Sheets-Sheet 1 D. W. OSMUN CONDUCTOR LINE JAR April 19, 1955 Filed Jan. 12, 195] April 19, 1955 D. w. osMUN 2,706,616

CONDUCTOR LINE JAR Filed Jan. l2, 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 -I--f :Eao

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P106 Z/N A92 Y M 221%/ 74/ w /Ns f/ff a/w x 10A b/* A INVENTOR. f Dean W. Osma/n 'f of BY A I M5 fa ATTORNEY April 19, 1955 D. W. OSMUN CONDUCTOR LINE JAR 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Jan. l2, 1951 IN V EN TOR. Dean W 05m wn BY m 5'.

[Illu ATTORNEY United States Patent CONDUCTOR LINE JAR Dean W. Osmun, Houston, Tex. Application January 12, 1951, Serial No. 205,790 1 Claim. (Cl. 255 27) This invention relates to a conductor line jar, and more particularly to a tool for use in oil well operations, wherein an electrical conductor extends through the jar, and whereby a jarring action can be obtained in the event of sticking of the equipment, without disrupting or otherwise interfering with the electrical connections.

In oil well operations it is frequently desirable to ernploy electrically operated devices such as perforating guns, well logging instruments and the like, which are customarily inserted in the bore of the well attached to a cable. When such devices are used, one or more electrical conductors must be lowered into the well along with the instrument in order to operate the same from the ground level. Such conductors are usually attached to or made a part of the cable on which the instruments are lowered.

Heretofore, in making use of electrically operated tools or instruments in wells, in the manner mentioned, no satisfactory method has been developed by which such devices or the means by which they are lowered into the well could be released, in the event of the same becoming stuck in the well, without breaking the conductor, or otherwise disrupting the electrical circuit. It has been necessary, therefore, to remove the equipment from the well after eifecting its release, and then to reinsert the same after repairing the electrical connections, before the operation can be resumed. The time and labor expended in releasing the stuck equipment, removing the same from the well, completing the necessary repairs and reinserting the equipment, is frequently great and may result in substantial loss in production of the well, or necessitate abandonment of the operations.

It is the primary object of this invention, therefore, to provide a conductor line jar for use with well equipment, including an electrical conductor, and having means whereby jarring operations may be carried out without disrupting the electrical connections.

Another object of the invention is to provide a conductor line jar having means for retaining the jar in a fully retracted condition while operating the equipment in the well in order to assure that the depth at which the instruments are located may be definitely determined, but which means is readily released or broken to permit actuation of the jar in the event that a jarring operation is necessary.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a conductor line jar embodying releasable means for retaining the jar in inoperative condition until the need arises for placing the same in condition for carrying out a jarring operation.

A further object of the invention is to provide a conductor line jar having an extensible electrical conductor passing therethrough which is adapted to be extended and contracted in conformity with corresponding movements of the operating parts of the jar without effecting the electrical circuit through the equipment.

The above and other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description, constituting a specification of the same, when considered in conjunction with the annexed drawings, wherein Figures 1A, 1B, 1C and 1D are vertical cross-sectional views showing a preferred form of the invention as applied to well testing or other equipment and in latched condition, wherein such equipment may be operated without the actuation of the jar for jarring purposes;

Figures 2A, 2B, 2C and 2D are similar vertical crossjar, showing the same in .u nlatched out a jarrmgoperation whlle mainconnectlon in undisrupted condiof Figure 5; and

Figure 8 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 8 8 of Figure 5.

Referring now to the drawings in greater detail, wherein like numerals of reference are employed to designate the same parts throughout the several views, the numeral 10 indicates a rope socket suitably connected with a conductor line 11 and provided with an externally threaded end portion 12. The conductor line may be of conventional construction having one or more inner insulated conductors as 13, surrounded by external strands 15 as best seen in Figures 6, 7 and 8, forming an armor for the conductors and serving to support the load of the equipment in the well. Means such as a set screw 17, or the like, may be provided in the rope socket, which means engages the strands of the armor to secure the conductor line to the socket. An upper connector member 14 having internal threads at its upper end, is screwed on to the end portion 12 of the rope socket 10, and is provided at its lower end with a reduced externally threaded pin 16 for attachment to the upper section 18 of the outer part of the jar. This outer part of the jar comprises the upper section 18, a lower tubular section 20, and an intermediate coupling member 22 connecting the upper and lower sections. The upper section 18 of the outer part of the jar is cylindrical in cross-section, as seen in Figure 3, and may be provided with longitudinal slots, as indicated at 24 and 26, for a purpose later to be made apparent. An external shoulder 28 is also provided on the upper section 18, below its upper end for a purpose to be explained hereinafter.

The lower section 20 of the outer part of the jar is cylindrical in cross-section, as seen in Figure 4 of the drawing, and has an externally threaded cylindrical member 30 threaded into its lower end, as best seen in Figures 1C and 2C. This lower section of the outer part of the jar is formed with a restricted internal portion extending downwardly from its upper end, as indicated at 32, and terminating above its lower end, as seen at 34. There is an inner part to the jar, which comprises an upper tubular section 36, and a lower tubular section 38. An internally threaded sleeve 40 is threaded onto the upper end of the lower section 38, and receives in its upper end the lower, reduced, externally threaded end portion 46 of an inner connector member 44, which member has an enlarged upper end 48 internally threaded for connection to the lower end of the upper section 36. Packing, such as the O-rings indicated at 50 and 52 is disposed in the connection between the upper section 36 and connector 44, and between the connector 44 and sleeve 40.

The space between the inner and outer jar parts forms a cylindrical chamber 42 located inside the lower section 20 of the outer jar part, and a piston 47 in the form of a sleeve surrounds the reduced portion 46 of the connector 44, which piston moves in the chamber when the inner and outer jar parts are moved longitudinally relative to each other. The piston 47 has an internal diameter somewhat larger than the outside diameter of the reduced portion 46 of the connector member 44, so that fluid may flow between the piston and the connector member when the piston moves in the chamber. Above the piston the enlarged portion 48 of the connector member 44 is provided with slots 51, and the portion 48 is of somewhat smaller outer diameter than the inside diameter of the outer section 22, so that Huid may pass by the enlarged portion 48, through slots 51 and between the reduced portion 46 of member 44 and the piston 47. At its lower end the piston 47 has outwardly opening slots 55, which communicate with an annular recess 53 in the reduced portion 46 of member 44. The inner sleeve 40 also has a somewhat smaller outer diameter than the inside diameter of the outer section 22, so that fluid may pass by the sleeve upon relative longitudinal movement between the inner and outer jar parts.

An O-ring 49 is movably disposed in the recess 53 so that the ring may move downwardly to allow fluid to flow through the space between the reduced portion 46 of connector member 44 and the piston 47 when the jar is going through a return or dumping movement. Upon relative movement of the inner and outer jar parts to secure a jarring action, the O-ring 49 will move upwardly in the recess 53 to seal the space between the reduced portion 46 of connector member 44 and the piston 47, and prevent the flow of uid therethrough through that s ace.

pThe upper section 36 of the inner part of the jar passes through the connecting member 22, which member may be provided with an internal groove for the reception of packing such as an O-ring 62, forming a uid tight seal between the section 36 and the connecting member. An external groove may also be formed in the member 22 for the reception of an O-ring 64 forming a fluid tight seal between the member 22 and the lower section 20. At its upper end the section 36 is provided with an exterior annular groove 66 providing an annular shoulder 68, for a purpose to wardly extending keys 70 and 72 are also located near the upper end of the section 36, which slide in 4the slots 24 and 26, and serve to prevent relative rotation of the inner and outer parts of the jar.

At its lower end the inner section 38 of the jar is attached to an internally threaded lower connector 74, which is provided at its lower end with a reduced externally threaded portion 76 for attachment to any desired instrument.

Pivotal latches 80 are secured on pivot pins 82 within the slots 24 and 26, mediate the ends of the outer section 18, of the jar.

The latches 80 are formed with inwardly extending hook portions 84, adapted to hook beneath the shoulder 68 of the inner section 36 of the jar, as best seen in Figure 1A, whereby the parts of the jar are latched together and retained against relative movement until it is desired to operate the jar. The latch members 80 are also provided with outwardly opening notches 86, which engage stop members 88 in the slots 24 and 26, to limit outward releasing movement of the latch members. An upwardly extending tapered arm 90 is provided on each of the latch members, which is disposed for engagement by a latch operating element or go-devil 92, of cylindrical formation, which may be dropped from above and passes downwardly over the line, rope socket, upper connector 14 and outer jar section 18, until it engages the external shoulder 28 provided on the section 18. This operating member is adapted to engage the arms 90 of the latches, to move the same into released positions as best seen in Figure 2A, wherein the inner and outer parts of the jar are unlatched and may be operated to perform a jarring action.

A line 99 in the form of a cable having one or more insulated conductors therein, extends through the rope socket and is secured thereto by a set screw 17, or the like. Extending completely through the jar there is an insulated electrical conductor 100, having at its upper end an electrical connector 102 and at its lower end an electrical connector 104, providing means for connecting the conductor to the conductor line above the jar and to any instruments below the jar in order to complete the electrical circuit through the jar to such instruments. This conductor 100 is preferably formed with an elastic extensible coil portion 106, located inside the outer jar section 18, so that relative movement between the inner and outer parts of the jar results in extension and contraction of the coil, whereby the jar may be freely operated without disrupting or otherwise interfering with the electrical circuit.

In operating the conductor line jar the electrical connector 102 of the cable 99 is connected to the conductor line by means of a connector member 108 attached to the conductor 100 and the connector 104 is connected be made apparent hereinafter. Out-v in conducting relation to any instruments below the jar by means of a connector member 109. The jar is initially latched in the condition seen in Figure lA, and the conductor line with its tools or instruments is lowered into the well. In this condition of the apparatus, the instruments can be operated in the usual manner, with the jar in latched condition. In the event, however, that the tool or instrument should become stuck in the well, the releasing member 92 may be dropped into the well over the conductor line and will engage and operate the latches 80 to unlatch the jar, after which the jar may be operated in the customary manner to release the stuck object. As will be seen from an inspection of Figures lA and 2A of the drawing relative movement of the inner and outer parts of the jar results in expansion and contraction of the coil portion 106 of the conductor 100, so that the jar may be freely operated without interference with the electrical circuit.

The jar is operated by applying a tension to the line in any convenient manner, in the condition of the jar as seen in Figures 1A, 1B, 1C and 1D, which causes the outer part of the jar to move upwardly relative to the inner part. Such movement causes the uid in the charnber 42to move from the lower portion 43 of the chamber past the sleeve 40, and through slots 55 into the recess 53. The upwardly moving uid moves the O-ring 49 upwardly in recess 53 to seal the space between the piston and the reduced portion 46 of member 44, so that the fluid must then pass between the piston and the outer section 20 to reach the upper end of the chamber. The piston 47, however, is only slightly larger in outer diameter than the restricted portion 32 of the chamber, so that when the piston moves in the restricted portion the ow of uid is restricted resulting in the building up of tension in the line.

As soon as the piston moves out of the restricted portion, the ow of fluid past the piston is suddenly increased and the tension in the line then causes the upper end of the cylindrical member 30 to strike the lower end of the sleeve 40, producing an upward jarring action on the stuck equipment.

On the return or dumping movement of the jar, the uid passes downwardly past the enlarged portion 48 of the connector member 44, past the piston 47 and sleeve 40 as the piston moves to the lower end of the chamber. A part of the uid also passes through the slots 51 and between `the piston 47 and the reduced portion 46 of connector member 44 and into the recess 53, moving the O-ring 49 downwardly, and passing from the recess 53 outwardly through slots 55. Thus, the downward flow of fluid is relatively unimpeded and the jar readily moves to return position.

In the modified form of the invention seen in Figures 5 to 8 of the drawings, the jar is of similar construction to that previously described, but is employed without the latching mechanism, any time without the need of first unlatching the parts, in the event of sticking of the equipment in the well.

In this form of the invention the conductor line extends through the jar in the same manner as the conductor previously described. The line, however, is formed of one or more insulated conductors enclosed in a number of strands 15, forming a cable 99' which bears the load of the jar and the testing equipment. The line so constructed is secured to the jar in the connector member 14, by set screws 117 or the like, and beneath the set screws, some of the strands 15 may be removed, to provide a relatively weakened portion 100' of the line within the jar as particularly shown in Figure 7. This weakened portion of the line is conveniently secured to the inner section 36 of the jar by means of the keys 70 and 72', which take the form of set screws so that in the event of sticking of the equipment in the well an upward pull on. the line will result in severing the weakened portion 100 to permit the jar to be readily operated. Below the keys 70 and 72', the strands 15 may be removed altogether, if desired, since this portion of the conductor does not bear any substantial load.

The operation of the jar is, in other respects, the same as that of the previously described form of the invention.

While the invention has been disclosed in connection with a particular embodiment of the same, it will be understood that this is intended by way of illustration only, and many changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of the various parts, without departing from so that the jar may be operated at the. spirit of the invention, or the scope of the appended claim.

What is claimed and desired to secure by Letters Patent is:

In a conductor line jar, inner and outer telescopically arranged tubular parts movable longitudinally relative to each other, coacting impact delivering means on the parts adapted to contact when the parts reach the limit of their outward movement relative to each other, a supporting cable extending through the parts, means connecting the cable to the parts with said impact delivering means out of contact, said cable havin the parts, and electri with said cable.

5 References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,456,681 Schepp et al. May 29, 1923 2,093,794 Baptie Sept. 21, 1937 10 2,609,182 Arutunoff Sept. 2, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1456681 *Jun 9, 1921May 29, 1923Schepp Albert JWell drill
US2093794 *Mar 22, 1937Sep 21, 1937Shell DevJar device
US2609182 *Nov 23, 1946Sep 2, 1952Armais ArutunoffApparatus for drilling deep wells
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3253245 *Mar 5, 1965May 24, 1966Chevron ResElectrical signal transmission for well drilling
US3913688 *Mar 11, 1974Oct 21, 1975Exxon Production Research CoApparatus for mounting electric conductor in a drill string
US3926269 *Mar 7, 1974Dec 16, 1975Cullen Res Roy HMethod and apparatus for earth boring
US4153120 *Oct 3, 1977May 8, 1979Scientific Drilling ControlsChange in length of drill string while instrument remains therein
US4325438 *Mar 24, 1980Apr 20, 1982Scientific Drilling ControlsLengthening drill string containing an instrument
US4416494 *Oct 6, 1980Nov 22, 1983Exxon Production Research Co.Apparatus for maintaining a coiled electric conductor in a drill string
US4553879 *Apr 24, 1984Nov 19, 1985Shell Oil CompanyPipelaying in artic offshore waters
US4591226 *Jan 31, 1983May 27, 1986Nl Industries, Inc.Annular electrical connectors for drill string
US4700788 *May 6, 1985Oct 20, 1987Shell Oil CompanyDirectional drilling pipelay
US6481495Sep 25, 2000Nov 19, 2002Robert W. EvansDownhole tool with electrical conductor
US7237626 *Jun 5, 2003Jul 3, 2007Ryan Energy TechnologiesTool module connector for use in directional drilling
US7267176Jan 13, 2004Sep 11, 2007Raymond Dale MaddenDownhole resettable jar tool with axial passageway and multiple biasing means
US20050150693 *Jan 13, 2004Jul 14, 2005Madden Raymond D.Downhole resettable jar tool with axial passageway and multiple biasing means
US20050205304 *Jun 5, 2003Sep 22, 2005Rishi GurjarTool module connector for use in directional drilling
US20110061934 *Sep 17, 2009Mar 17, 2011Technical Drilling ToolsVibration Damping Tool for Downhole Electronics
DE2325161A1 *May 18, 1973Jan 17, 1974Exxon Production Research CoVerfahren und vorrichtung zum montieren einer elektrischen leitung in einem bohrloch
WO2002025051A2 *Sep 24, 2001Mar 28, 2002Evans Robert WJar with electrical conductor
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/297, 175/104, 175/300, 174/68.1, 439/191
International ClassificationE21B31/107, E21B31/00, E21B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B31/107, E21B17/003
European ClassificationE21B31/107, E21B17/00K