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Publication numberUS2706634 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 19, 1955
Filing dateSep 21, 1950
Priority dateSep 21, 1950
Publication numberUS 2706634 A, US 2706634A, US-A-2706634, US2706634 A, US2706634A
InventorsValkenburg James F Van
Original AssigneeValkenburg James F Van
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatically timed target
US 2706634 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 19, 1955 J. F. VAN VALKENBURG 2,706,534

AUTOMATICAILY TIMED TARGET Filed Sept. 2l, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet l 1N VEN TOR.

Qi/XM April 19, 1955 J. F. VAN VALKENBURG 2,706,634

AUTOMATICALLY TIMED TARGET 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 2l, 41950 y mw. M TM W Ne I H w... F. P .m JY B April 19, 1955 J. F. VAN VALKENBURG 2,706.634

AUTOMATICALLY TIMED TARGET Filed Sept. 2l, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 l. v l

INVENTOR. James'F Van V/enburg TTOENE'Y April 19, 1955 J. F. VAN VALKENBURG AUTOMATICALLY TIMED TARGET 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Sept. 2l, 1950 NNN INVENTOR. Jhes F Van /a//enburg BY @MKM f? Tram/EY United States Patent O M AUTOMATICALLY TIMED TARGET James F. Van Valkenburg, Collingdale, Pa.

Application September 21, 1950, Serial No. 186,001

Claims. (Cl. 273-105.6)

The present invention relates to target-presenting apparatus and particularly to mechanism adapted intermittently to present a target in a shooting-gallery, pistolrange or the like. h

Ari object of the present invention is to provide apparatus for intermittently presenting a target in a shooting-gallery or the like; said apparatus presenting the target for a predetermined period of time.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a target which is retracted for a period of time and then suddenly presented in the firing range of a shooting-gallery or the like, for a short time-interval, and thereafter retracted from the range.

Another object of the present invention is to provide warning-means to signal the approach of a target in a shooting-gallery or the like.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a target-presenting apparatus which can be adjusted to present the target in the line of re for varying periods of time; said time-interval being predetermined and adjustable.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for suddenly presenting and suddenly retracting a target in a shooting-gallery, rifle-range or the like.

The above and other objects will be apparent by reference to the appended specification, claims and drawings.

For the purpose of illustrating the invention there are shown in the accompanying drawings forms thereof which are at present preferred, although it is to be understood that the various instrumentalities of which the invention consists can be variously arranged and organized and that the invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and organizations of the instrumentalities as herein shown and described.

In the drawings wherein like reference characters indicate like parts:

Figure 1 represents a perspective view of one embodiment of the target-presenting apparatus of the present invention.

Figure 2 represents a top plan view of the target-presenting apparatus shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 represents a side elevational view of the target-presenting apparatus shown in Figures 1 and 2.

Figure 4 represents an end elevational view of the target-presenting apparatus shown in Figures 1 to 3, inclusive.

Figure 5 represents a fragmentary plan view of the position of the actuating mechanism embodiment of the target-presenting apparatus shown in Figures 1 to 4, inclusive, a short period of time after the position shown in Figure 2.

Figure 6 represents a fragmentary plan view, like Figures 2 and 5, taken a short period of time after the position shown in Figure 5.

Figure 7 represents a fragmentary plan view, like Figures 2, 5 and 6, taken a short period of time after the position disclosed in Figure 6.

Figure 8 represents a fragmentary plan view, like Figures 2 and 5 to 7, inclusive, taken a short period of time after the position shown in Figure 7 and shortly before the position shown in Figure 2.

Figure 9 represents a perspective view of another embodiment of the target-presenting apparatus of the present invention.

Figure 10 represents a top plan view of the embodiment shown in Figure 9.

2,706,634 Patented Apr. 19, 1955 Figure 11 represents a side elevational view of the embodiment shown in Figures 9 and 10.

Figure 12 represents an end elevational view of the embodiment shown in Figures 9 to 11, inclusive.

Figure 13 represents a fragmentary plan View of the actuating mechanism of the embodiment of Figure 9, shown in a position slightly later than the position dis closed n Figure 10.

Figure 14 represents a fragmentary plan View like Figures 9 and 13, showing the apparatus in a position slightly later than the position shown in Figure 13.

Figure 15 represents a fragmentary plan view of the position of the actuating mechanism slightly later than the position shown in Figure 14.

Figure 16 represents a fragmentary plan view of the apparatus shown in a position subsequent to the position of Figure 15 and prior to the position of Figure 10.

One embodiment of the target-presenting apparatus of the present invention, shown in Figures 1 to 8 inclusive, includes a housing 20 which may comprise an upper portion 21 and a lower portion 22 operatively cooperating to form a generally hollow block or box.

A spindle 23 is vertically and pivotally supported in the housing 20, by the members 21 and 22, with a portion 24 thereof protruding above the upper housingmember 21. The spindle 23 may have a slit 25 in the upper portion 24, removably to receive therein a target 26. A collar 27 may be adjustably secured to the spindle 23 by the set screw 28 to provide a bearingmember against the upper surface of the housing-portion 21, and also to permit axial adjustment of the spindle 23 with respect to the housing 20, for a purpose to be hereinafter explained.

The spindle 23 is free to rotate in the housing 20 so that the target 26 carried thereby may pivot about the axis of the spindle 23. Thus, the target 26 may assume a position generally parallel to the maximum dimension of the housing 20, as shown in Figures 1 and 5, or may assume a position transversely thereto, as is shown particularly in Figures 6 and 7.

The housing 20 of the present invention is adapted to be placed in a shooting-gallery, rifle-range or pistolrange or the like, with the major dimension of the housing 20 generally parallel to the line-of-re, so that the target 26, in the position shown in Figure 1, is presented with only a single edge facing the mechanism, and thus is generally ineffective as a target. However, the targetpresenting apparatus of the present invention is adapted to pivot the target through an angle of so as to present the entire target broadside or in full view of the marksman. This 90 rotation of the target is accomplished as follows.

Within the housing 20, a bracket 29 is secured to the spindle 23 and adapted to rotate therewith. The bracket 29 includes a generally arcuate portion 30, extending on one side thereof. The depending end 32 of the arm 31 is adapted to enter a notch 33 in a locking beam 34, as is shown particularly in Figures 1, 2 and 5, when the target 26 is disposed edge-wise to the line-of-re generally indicated by the arrow 35. The locking beam 34 is constantly urged, by the spring 36, toward the arm 31, and has a trip-arm 37 extending past the spindle 23.

A flexible finger or spring 38 is secured to the end 32 of the arm 31 and extends past the spindle 23, on the opposite side thereof from the trip-arm 37.

Thus, the spindle 23, with the target 26 secured thereto, is held in the position shown in Figures 1, 2 and 5 by the interlocking engagement of the end 32 of the arm 31 in the notch 33 of the locking beam 34.

The locking beam 34 is supported by and adapted to rotate about the pivot 39. The end 32 of the arm 31 will be disengaged from the notch 33 when the beam 34 is pivoted, against the action of the spring 36, about the pivot 39. When the end 32 of the arm 31 is disengaged from the notch 33, the spindle 23, target 26, bracket 29 and spring 38 are free to pivot about the axis of the spindle 23. v

A motor 40 is supported within the housing 20 with the axis thereof inclined slightly, as is shown particularly in Figure 4, and with a rotating beam 41 secured to the shaft 42 thereof. An upturned finger 43 is formed at the outer end of the beam 41. The shaft 42 is adapted slowly to rotate within the housing 20 and, to this end, the motor 40 may be a small electric motor, the spindle of which rotates at approximately 1 R. P. M.

The arcuate portion 30 of the bracket 29 is notched, as at 44, to present a vertically broad intermediate portion 45 and a vertically narrow end-portion 46.

The upturned finger 43 of the beam 41 is adapted to pass beneath the narrow portion 46 of the arcuate member 30, due to the inclination of the shaft 42 of the motor 40, as is shown particularly in Figure 4, when the beam 41 rotates in the direction of the arrow 47. Continued rotation of the beam 41 brings the .finger 43 against the spring 38, as is shown particularly 1n Figure 5, and bends the spring 38 toward the spindle 23, with the end 32 of the arm 31 held in position by the notch 33 on the locking beam 34.

Further rotation of the beam 41 tensions the spring 38 and brings the finger 43 against the end 48 of the trip-arm 37 on the beam 34. Then the finger 43 strikes the end 48 of the trip-arm 37, the locking beam 34 pivots about the pivot 39 and releases the end 32 of the arm 31 from the notch 33. The tensioned spring 38 then rotates the spindle 23 and the target 26 through the angle of 90, as is shown particularly in Figure 6, rapidly presenting the target broadside to the line-of-fire indicated by the arrow 35.

Continued rotation of the beam 41 brings the finger 43 beyond the end 0f the spring 38 and past the end 48 of the trip 37 into contact with the arcuate portion 30 of the bracket 29.

A torsion spring 49 supported on the spindle 23, has one end secured to the bracket 29, as at 50, constantly urging the bracket 29, spindle 23 and target 26 in the direction of the arrow 51. The bracket, spindle and target are prevented from returning to the original position shown in Figures l, 2 and 5 by the finger 43 on the beam 41 which engages the arcuate portion 30 of the bracket 29, as is shown particularly in Figure 7, thus holding the target 26 broadside to the line-of-fire 35 until the finger 43 passes beyond the end of the arcuate portion 30. When this happens, as is shown in Figure 8, the torsion spring 49 spins the target 26, spindle 23 and bracket 29 rapidly in the direction of the arrow 51 until the end 32 of the arm 31 reenters the notch 33 on the locking beam 34, and the target is once again presented edge-wise to the line-of-fire.

The target 26 will remain in its ineffective position, shown in Figures 1, 2 and 5, until the end 43 of the beam 41 continues rotating to the point shown in Figures 5 and 6 where the target is once again tripped and presented broadside to the line-of-fire.

inasmuch as the included angle between the position of the beam 41 at the point of contact with the end 48 of the lever 37 (shown in Figure 6) and its position when it passes beyond the end of the arcuate portion 30 (shown in Figure 7) is approximately 120, the time-interval during which the target will be presented broadside to the line-of-fire will be approximately 20 seconds.

The time-interval can be shortened as follows:

The set screw 28 on the collar 27 may be released. and the spindle 23 with the bracket 29 secured thereto is raised slightly (approximately one-half the vertical distance of the vertically-broad portion 45 of the arcuate member 30). Then the set screw is re-sccured to the spindle 23 so that the target, spindle and bracket 29 are supported at a slightly higher level than before. Thus, the target-presenting apparatus will operate as hereinabove described except that the finger 43 of the beam 41 will travel along the arcuate member 30 at a lower level than heretofore, holding the bracket 29 in the position shown in Figures 6 and 7 while the finger 43 contacts the broad intermediate portion 45 of the arcuate member 30. However, the finger 43 will no longer engage the arcuate member 30 after it passes beyond the notch 44 therein, inasmuch as the top of the finger 43, in the higher position of the spindle 23, is at a lower level than the vertically-narrow end-portion 46 of the arcuate member 30. Thus, the spindle 23 can be rotated back to the position shown in Figure 1, by the spring 49, after the finger 43 has passed beyond the notch 44 in the arcuate member 30.

The notch 44 may, selectively, be placed half-way between the point of contact (shown in Figure 6) of the finger 43 and the end 48 of the arm 37, and the outermost end of the arcuate member 30. This point is illustrated at 52, in Figure 6. The included angle between the point of contact shown in Figure 6 and the point 52 is approximately 60, so that the time interval during which the target is presented broadside to the line of fire is only 10 seconds, when the spindle is in the elevated position.

lt is to be understood that a plurality of notches and a number of portions of varying width may be formed in the arcuate member 30 so that any predetermined number of time-intervals (during which the target is presented broadside to the line-of-fire) may be afforded, simply by changing the elevation of the spindle 23 to the proper or pre-selected terminal point-of-contact between the finger 43 and the arcuate member 30.

An alarm is provided whereby to signal, shortly before the target is turned into the line-of-ire, thus to announce the fact that the target shortly will be presented to the view of the marksman. The alarm includes a bell 53 secured within the housing 20 and a clapper or striker 54 which is supported on the pivot 39 and which is held by the spring 55 closely adjacent, but preferably not in contact with, the bell 53. The clapper 54 has a plurality of notches, 56, 57 and 58, formed on one side thereof, and adapted to be engaged by the finger 43 on the beam 41. Thus, as the beam 41 rotates, the finger 43 first `strikes the projecting portion 59 of the notch 56, swinging the clapper 54 away from the bell. Then, when the finger 43 enters the notch 56, the clapper is swung against the bell 53 by the spring 55, issuing a warning note. In like manner, as the finger 43 engages the projecting portion 60 of the notch 57, and the projecting portion 61 of the notch 58, subsequently entering the respective notches, additional warning notes are sounded.

Thus, as is described above, a plurality of warning signals can be sounded when the clapper 54 strikes the bell 53, the last of which occurs a short period of time (approximately 5 seconds) before the finger 43 strikes the end 48 of the trip 37 to pivot the target 26 broadside to the line-of-fire.

The operation of the embodiment shown in Figures l to 8, inclusive, is as follows. The collar 27 is adjusted, by means of the set screw 28, so that the spindle 23 and the bracket 29 are rotatably supported in the housing 20 to give either a l0-second or 20-seeond timeinterval (or any other selectable time-interval) during which the target will be presented to the line-of-fire. This is determined by selecting the point at which the finger 43 will move out of contact with the arcuate member 30. Thereafter, the rnotor 40 is set in operation and the beam 41 is caused to rotate. As the finger 43 moves in the direction of the arrow 47, it first strikes the projecting portion 59 of the clapper 54, then moves into the notch 56, permitting the clapper 54 to strike the bell 53 and issue a warning signal. Subsequently, the finger 43 strikes the projection 60, passes beneath the arm 30, and enters the notch 57, issuing a second warning signal. Thereafter, the finger 43 strikes the projection 61 and enters the notch 58 to sound still another warning signal. Then the finger 43 strikes the spring 38 and bends it toward the spindle 23, until the finger 43 strikes the end 48 of the arm 37, to pivot the locking beam 34 and disengage the notch 33 and the arm 31. The tensioned spring 38 spins the spindle 23 and the target 26 (against the action of the torsion spring 49) to move the target broadside to the line-offire 35. The target 26 is held broadside by the engagement of the finger 43 with the spring 38, as is shown in Figure 6, and, thereafter, by engagement of the finger 43 with the arcuate member 30 (shown in Figures 6 and 7). The target is held broadside until the finger 43 passes beyond the end of the arcuate member (or the notch 44 thereof) whereupon the spring 49 returns the spindle 23, bracket 29 and target 26 to the position shown in Figures 1, 2 and 5.

Continued rotation of the beam 41 repeats the cycle described above and, once a minute, presents the target 26 broadside to the line-of-fire for a period of 20 seconds (or other predetermined time-interval) Immediately preceding the presentation of the target, a plurality of warning signals are sounded to indicate that the target soon will be in view.

With respect to the embodiment shown in Figures 9 to 16, inclusive, the motor 40, beam 41, finger 43, bell 53, clapper 54, spindle 23, collar 27, target 26 and housing 20 are the same as described hereinabove, except that the motor-spindle need not be inclined, but may be parallel with the spindle 23.

I n this second embodiment, an arm 62 is secured, at one end 63, to the spindle 23 and extends radially outwardly therefrom. Rotatably supported on the spindle 23 is a beam 64 with a collar 65 slidably mounted on the beam 64 and a bearing-portion 66 of the collar 65 pivotally engaging the tip of the finger 43, as is shown particularly in Figure 9. A spring 67 has one end secured to a projection 68 on the beam 64 and the other end secured to a projection 69 on the arm 62.

A locking-member 70 is rotatably supported on the pivot 71 and has one arcuate arm 72 extending on one side of the spindle 23 with a second arcuate arm 73 extending on the other side of the spindle 23. A notch 74 is formed in the arcuate finger 72 and a notch 75 is formed in the arcuate finger 73.

The outer end of the arm 62 is adapted to enter either the notch 74 or the notch 75, and the angle between the position of the arm 62, when secured in the notch 74, and its position when secured in the notch 75, is 90. Thus, when the finger 62 is secured in the notch 74, the spindle 23 and the target 26 are disposed so that only an edge of the target is presented to the line-of-fire. However, if the finger 62 is released from the notch 74 and moves into the notch 75, the target 26 and the spindle 23 are pivoted in the direction of the arrow 76, to rotate 90 and present the target broadside to the line-of-fire.

The operation of the second embodiment is as follows. With the finger 62 secured in the notch 74 and the target 26 presented edge-wise to the line-of-fire, the beam 41 rotates in the direction of the arrow 47 and slides the sleeve 65 inwardly on the beam 64, at the same time pivoting the outer end 77 of the beam in the direction of the arrow 76. This moves the projection 68 away from the notch 74 and tensions the spring 67 to urge the finger 62 in the direction of the arrow 76. However, the finger 62 cannot move because it is secured in the notch 74.

As the finger 43 continues to rotate, it actuates the warning mechanism hereinabove described and then strikes the end 78 of the arm 72 as shown in Figure 14, to pivot the arm 72 about the pivot 71 and release the finger 62 from the notch 74. In this position, the spring 67 quickly snaps or pivots the finger 62 until the end thereof swings against the arm 73 and into the notch 75 thereof. This pivots the target 26 through an angle of 90 and presents it broadside to theline-of-fire. As the sleeve 65 and the finger 43 continue to rotate (passing between the spindle 23 and the shaft 42 of the motor 40) the beam 64 is swung to the position shown in Figure (counter to the direction of the arrow 76) and thus the spring 67 tensions the finger 62 to pull it out of the notch 7S. How ever, the finger 62 will remain in the notch 75 until the arm 73 is rotated about the pivot 71 to disengage the end of the finger 62 from the notch 75.

The outer end of the arm 73 extends beyond the notch 75, as at 79, to form a contact-point or camming-surface against which the finger 43 is adapted to strike (as shown in Figure 16) to pivot the arm 73 counterclockwise (when viewed from above), releasing the finger 62 from the notch 75 and permitting the spring 67 to rotate the finger 62 back into the notch 74. The time-interval from presentation of the target (shown in Figure 14) until the finger 43 strikes the extension 79 of the arm 73 may be approximately 10 seconds, so that the target will'be presented to the line-of-fire for a lO-second interval.

A second trip-arm 73-a is pivotably supported beneath the arm 73 and beneath the arm 72 on the shaft 71. This arm 73-a has a notch 75-a formed therein (beneath the notch 75 in the arm 73) into which the arm 62 is adapted to enter when the spindle 23 is lowered slightly by releasing the set screw in the collar 27 and adjusting the spindle 23 to a slightly lower level. In this lowered position of the spindle 23 the arm 62 will engage, successively, first the notch 74 in the arm 72 and then the notch 75-a in the arm 73-a.

The end 80 of the arm 73-a extends beyond the notch 75-a a greater distance than does the end 79 of the arm 73; the end 80 being disposed with relation to the shaft 42 of the motor 40 so that the cam-like end thereof will be engaged by the finger 43 of the arm 41 approximately 10 seconds after the finger 43 has engaged the cam-like end 79 of the arm 73.

Therefore, with the spindle 23 in lowered position, the finger 62 engages the notch 75-a instead of the notch 75 and the pivoting of the arm 73 when the finger 43 strikes the end 79 thereof will not release the finger 62 at the end of a lO-second interval. Continued rotation of the arm 41 brings the finger 43 against the end 80 of the arm 73-a and rotates the arm 73-a to release the finger 62 from the notch 75-a at the end of an additional 10second interval. Thus the target 26 will be returned to its original position (shown in Figure 13) after an elapsed period of 20 seconds during which the target was presented broadside to the line-of-fire.

The spindle 23 can be adjusted so that the finger 62 will, successively, engage first the arm 72 and then either the arm 73 or the arm 73-a, whereby selectively a 10- second or 20-second period will elapse during which time the target will be presented broadside to the line-of-fire.

After the spring 67 has returned the finger 62 into engagement with the notch 74 on the arm 72, the beam 64, oscillated by the finger 43 (and the sleeve 65 sliding thereon) to the initial position shown in Figures 9, 10 and 13, and the cycle is repeated.

The arms 73 and 73-a (and their extensions 79 and 80, respectively) may be modified, or additional arms may be added at different levels so that a greater selection of time-intervals is available during which the target is presented broadside to the line-of-fire.

The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof, and it is therefore desired that the present embodiment be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, reference being had to the appended claims rather than to the foregoing description to indicate the scope of the invention.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is the following:

1. A target-presenting apparatus including a pivotable spindle, a bracket secured to said spindle and adapted to pivot therewith, a locking-member to secure said bracket against rotation, a spring substantially constantly urging said bracket into engagement with said locking-member, a trip, said bracket and said locking member being disengaged when said trip is moved, a rotatable nger mounted adjacent said trip and bracket, said rotatable finger adapted to engage said trip and release said bracket, said finger adapted to engage, turn and hold said bracket against the action of said spring.

2. A target including a pivotable spindle, a bracket secured to said spindle and adapted to pivot therewith, a locking-member to secure said bracket against rotation, a sprlng substantially constantly urging said bracket into engagement with said locking-member, a trip, said bracket and said locking member being disengaged when said trip is moved, a rotatable finger mounted adjacent said trip and bracket, said rotatable finger adapted to engage said trip and release said bracket, said finger adapted to engage, turn and hold said bracket against the action of said spring.

3. A target-presenting apparatus including a pivotable axially moveable and adjustable spindle, a bracket secured to said spindle and adapted to pivot therewith, a locking-member to secure said bracket against rotation, a spring substantially constantly urging said bracket into engagement with said locking-member, a trip, said bracket and said locking member being disengaged when said trip is moved, a rotatable finger mounted adjacent said trip and bracket, said rotatable finger adapted to engage said trip and release said bracket, said finger adapted to engage, turn and hold said bracket against the action of said spring.

4. A target-presenting apparatus including a pivotable spindle, a bracket secured to said' spindle and adaptedk to pivot therewith, said bracket having a curved arm extending beyond said spindle, a locking-member to secure said bracket against rotation, a spring substantially constantly urging said bracket into engagement with said locking-member, a trip, said bracket and said locking member being disengaged when said trip is moved, a rotatable fnger mounted adjacent said trip and bracket, said rotatable finger adapted to engage said trip and release said bracket, said finger adapted to engage said arm and turn and hold said bracket against the action of said spring.

5. A target-presenting apparatus including a pivotable spindle, a bracket secured to said spindle and adapted to pivot therewith, a locking-member to secure said bracket against rotation, a spring substantially constantly urging said bracket into engagement with said lockingmember, a trip on said locking-member, said bracket and said locking member being disengaged when said trip is 7 moved, a exible Contact on said bracket, a rotatable finger mounted adjacent said trip and bracket, said rotatable finger adapted to engage and tension said flexible contact and thereafter to contact said trip and release said bracket, said finger adapted to engage, turn and hold said bracket against the action of said spring.

6. A target-presenting apparatus including a pivotable spindle, a bracket secured to said spindle and adapted to pivot therewith, said bracket having a curved arm extending beyond said spindle, a locking-member to secure said bracket against rotation, a spring substantially constantly urging said bracket into engagement with said locking-member, a trip, said bracket and said lockingI member being disengaged when said trip is moved, a rotatable linger adapted to engage said trip and release said bracket, said linger adapted to engage, turn and hold said bracket against the action of said spring, said curved arm having portions of varying width whereby said finger may move out of contact therewith at diierent points along its length.

7. A target-presenting apparatus including a pivotable axially moveable and adjustable spindle, a bracket secured to said spindle and adapted to pivot therewith, said bracket having a curved arm extending beyond said spindle, a locking-member to secure said bracket against rotation, a spring substantially constantly urging said bracket into engagement with said locking-member, a trip, said bracket and said locking member being disengaged when said trip is moved, a rotatable finger adapted to engage said trip and release said bracket, said finger adapted to engage, turn and hold said bracket against the action of said spring, said curved arm having portions of varying width whereby said finger may move out of contact therewith at different points along its length, the point of disengagement between said finger and said curved arm depending upon the axial position of said spindle.

8. A target-presenting apparatus including a pivotable spindle, a bracket secured to said spindle and adapted to pivot therewith, a locking-member to secure said bracket against rotation, a spring substantially constantly urging said bracket into engagement with said locking-member, a trip, said bracket and said locking member being disengaged when said trip is moved, a rotatable linger mounted adjacent said trip and bracket, said rotatable iinger adapted to engage said trip and release said bracket, said finger adapted to engage, turn and hold said bracket against the action of said spring, a warning signal, a clapper for said signal adapted to be actuated by said finger prior to engagement between said finger and said trip.

9. A target-presenting apparatus including a pivotable axially moveable and adjustable spindle, a bracket secured to Said spindle and adapted to pivot therewith, an adjustable collar on said spindle whereby pivotably to secure said spindle and said bracket selectively in one of several axial positions, a locking-member to secure said bracket against rotation, a spring substantially constantly urging said bracket into engagement with said lockingmember, a trip, said bracket and said locking member being disengaged when said trip is moved, a rotatable finger mounted adjacent said trip and bracket, said rotatable nger adapted to engage said trip and release said bracket, said finger adapted to engage, turn and hold said bracket against the-action of said spring.

10. A target-presenting apparatus including a pivotable spindle, a bracket-secured to said spindle and adapted to pivot therewith, a locking-member to secure said bracket against rotation, a spring substantially constantly urging said bracket into engagement with said lockingmember, a trip, said bracket and said locking member being disengaged when said trip is moved, a rotatable linger mounted adjacent said trip and bracket, said rotatlzblekiinger adapted to engage said -trip and release said rac et.

References Cited in the fileof this patent UNITED STATESPATENTS 1,424,632 Fenton Aug. l, 1922 2,104,171 Schwerin Jan. 4, 1938 2,344,829 McAvoy Mar. 2l, 1944 2,479,354 Hanson Aug. 16, 1949 2,504,273 Murphy Apr. 18, 1950

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Referenced by
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US2905469 *Sep 19, 1955Sep 22, 1959Taylor Howard ATarget device
US3348843 *Feb 18, 1964Oct 24, 1967Stanley George LAutomatic target stand
US3874670 *Nov 30, 1973Apr 1, 1975Weihl Donald EAutomated firing range
US4032146 *May 7, 1976Jun 28, 1977Bell & Howell CompanyTarget assembly for a target practice range
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US5163689 *Mar 20, 1991Nov 17, 1992Bateman Kyle ETurning target support structure and system
US7431302Aug 29, 2006Oct 7, 2008Action Target, Inc.Modular ballistic wall and target system
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US8550465Aug 17, 2006Oct 8, 2013Action Target Inc.Multifunction target actuator
US8579294Dec 20, 2011Nov 12, 2013Action Target Inc.Emergency stopping system for track mounted movable bullet targets and target trolleys
US8684361Jan 13, 2012Apr 1, 2014Action Target Inc.Target system
US20120043722 *Jan 19, 2011Feb 23, 2012Mironichev Sergei YSmart shooting range
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/406
International ClassificationF41J7/00, F41J7/06
Cooperative ClassificationF41J7/06
European ClassificationF41J7/06