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Publication numberUS2706957 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 26, 1955
Filing dateJan 15, 1946
Priority dateJan 15, 1946
Publication numberUS 2706957 A, US 2706957A, US-A-2706957, US2706957 A, US2706957A
InventorsArthur V Hughes
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical control
US 2706957 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 26, 1955 A. v. HUGHES ELECTRICAL CONTROL 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 15, 1946 INVENTOR BY Mi.

ATTORNEY April 26, 1955 A. v. HUGHES 2,706,957 ELECTRICAL CONTROL Filed Jan. 15, 1946 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR flrf/ll/r [fluyfiesr 4 51.! Z. ATTORNEY April 26, 1955 A. v. HUGHES 2,706,957 ELECTRICAL CONTROL Filed Jan. 15, 1946 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 BY W ATTORNEY United States Patent ELECTRICAL CONTROL Arthur V. Hughes, Sharon, Pa., assignor to Westinghouse Electric Corporation, East Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application January 15, 1946, Serial No. 641,377

18 Claims. (Cl. 114--20) My invention relates to torpedoes and, more particularly, to electrical control systems for jet, or rocket, propelled torpedoes.

My system of control is intended for use primarily on ranging, or exercise, shots of torpedoes where it is not desirable to use a torpedo firing tube nor to use plane launching. My invention does, however, also apply to plane launched torpedoes and to the type of torpedo fired from a tube. However, as disclosed in detail hereinafter, my invention is used with a torpedo that starts from a stationary suspension above or in the Water.

An object of my invention is the provision of electrical control for jet propelled torpedoes.

Another object of my invention is the provision of remote control firing systems for jet propelled torpedoes.

Another object of my invention is the provision of depth control time delay for controlling the trajectory of accelerating torpedoes.

- The objects recited are merely illustrative. Many other objects and advantages will become more apparent from a study of the following specification and the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1.is a diagrammatic showing of the electrical control for a jet propelled torpedo;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the tailcone and after-body of a jet propelled torpedo; and

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view of the exercise head of the torpedo.

For ranging, or exercise, shots, it is very desirable thatthe torpedo at the end of its run become buoyant. I, therefore, provide a set of switches, as C, and d, operated by cams driven by the electric timer motor TM. This motor once the trigger switch 3 has been operated controls the entire sequence of operation of the events that are to take place from the moment the trigger switch 3 is operated until the torpedo propulsion has stopped and the torpedo is buoyant.

The torpedo includes the gyrostat GS for controlling the steering rudders 100 .and 101. Suitable solenoids, as solenoid RRS for operation of the rudders to the right and solenoid LRS for operation of the steering rudders to the left, are interconnected with the source of electric energy B and the gyro steering control.

The depth control includes a pendulum and a pressure responsive diaphragm also acting on the pendulum. The pendulum movement is thus a function of pressure of the sea water above the torpedo and the angular disposition of the torpedo axis with reference to the horizon.

The pendulum of the depth control DP actuates contacts 42 which control the elevator rudders mounted in horizontal bearings in the tail-cone T and actuated by the yoke 102. The yoke 102 is mechanically coupled to the armatures of the down rudder solenoid DRS and up rudder solenoid URS.

The timer motor, operating a controller of well known design including cams for operating the contacts a, b,

c, and d in sequence, on start allows suflicient time for the gyro wheel W to come up to rated speed, and then the gyrostat is unlatched and the wheel declutched from the motor. At the same time the gyrostat is unlatched,

the torpedo is released from its suspension and the jet motor is fired automatically.

By keeping the running time of the gyromotor to a minimum, an unnecessary drain will not be placed on the internal battery source. The other functions of the timer motor are (1) to provide a depth control time ice delay, (2) to energize the exercise head blow off system, and (3) to deenergize the control circuit at the end of the run.

For safety reasons, an external source of energy is used to fire the jet motor M. The leads, designated To Shore, to the external source are led past the nozzle N of the jet motor M and into the torpedo through a suitable packing gland and are burned away almost instantaneously when the motor starts, thus releasing the torpedo for its run. The external source, or external battery EB is not connected by the closure of the shore switch SS until the torpedo is ready to be started so that, prior to that time, even it the trigger switch T should accidentally be actuated during handling or transportation of the torpedo. The jet motor M will thus only become operative after both the trigger switch T and the shore switch SS are actuated.

These safety features are important for a torpedo of this type, since a jet propelled torpedo, unlike a propeller driven torpedo, develops full thrust in the atmosphere. Accidental starting would involve a considerable hazard to personnel and surroundings over a wide area.

The exercise head is substantially of conventional shape and includes the ballast liquid chamber 104 and a ballast liquid discharge valve 105. The flask F containing the CO2 is mounted on the bulkhead between the exercise head and the battery compartment. A squib operated valve 55 opens the flask to the exercise head to force the ballast liquid out of the exercise head.

The battery compartment is relatively small and extremely simple in construction as seen from Fig. 3. A large battery is not needed because the load units are relatively few but above all are of the type that do not appreciably load the battery.

The tail-cone and after-body have the general outside contour of a conventional torpedo but the internal construction is radically different.

The propulsion motor M comprises an extremely strong elongated tank 107 provided with a reinforced thrust ring 108. This ring is bolted to the thrust receiving spider 109 rigidly secured to'the torpedo body.

The bulkhead 110 carries the solenoids for actuating the rudders and fits snugly about the aft end of the tank of the motor to center the aft end. The bulkhead 110 does, however, not receive the thrust of the motor. The thrust is all taken by the spider 109 from the thrust ring 108.

At the region of the forward end of the motor M, the torpedo is provided with an inwardly directed flange 112 upon which a selected number of ballast rings 113 are bolted. The ring and semiring constructions are chosen so that the torpedo may be given a proper balance longitudinally, the trim may be adjusted, and propulsion motors of differential axial length may be used.

A better understanding of my invention may be had from a study of a typical operating cycle of a torpedo making an exercise run.

When the torpedo T is to be setin operation, the block 1 is withdrawn from under the lever 2 of the springbiased trigger switch 3 whereupon a circuit is established from the positive terminal of the battery B through conductor 4, contacts 5 and 6 of the trigger switch 3, conductors 7 and 8, the contacts d under the control of the timer motor TM, resistor 9, actuating coil 10 of the stop switch 11 and conductors 12 and 13 to the negative terminal of the battery B.

Operation of the stop switch 11 establishes a circuit from the positively energized conductor 7 through contacts 14, conductor 15, actuating coil 16 of the timer contactor 17 to the negative terminal of the battery B. Operation of the timer contactor efiects the closing of contacts 18 to connect the timer motor across a suitable portion of the battery B. The timer motor thus begins I to operate and after appropriate successive time intervals ductor 15 through the gyro motor GM, resistor 20, actuating coil 21 of the initial-up-rudde r-relay IURR, to conductor 13. The energization of co l 21 is, however, substantially nil because the gyro switch 19, shunting C011 21, is at this stage closed.

Since the gyro motor is in firm clutching engagement with the shaft of thie gyro wheel W, the gyro wheel 15 brou htu tosee.

Asiumii g that the torpedo is launched, or started pointing directly at the target, namely, that the contact wheel 22 of the gyrostat is directly on the narrow insulating strip 23. A circuit is thus established from conductor 15 -.through resistor 24, conducting sector 25, conductor 26, actuating coil 27 of the auxiliary relay TR2 to conductor 13. A similar circuit is established from conductor 15 through resistor 28, conducting sector 29, conductor 30, and the actuating coil 31 of the auxiliary relay TR1 to conductor 13. The contacts 48 and 51 are thus opened and the steering rudders are thus not actuated to either side of the longitudinal axis of the torpedo.

After the gyro wheel is up to full speed, the timer motor operates its contacts a, closing them, thereby establishing a circuit from conductor 15 through contacts a, the coil 32 for actuating the gyro clutch GC. An instant after the gyro wheel is declutched from the gyro motor, the spring biased levers 33 and 34, lpcking the gyrostat in position, are operated by the biasing springs shown. The gyrostat is thus released and can thus assume the required steering control.

Operation of lever 33 also releases the gyro release switch, or contactor 63, whereupon the contacts 19 are opened and contacts 59 are closed.

Opening of contacts 19 removes the shunt for coil 21, and this initial-up-rudder-relay operates to close contacts 35. Closing of contacts 35 establishes a circuit from conductor 15 through contacts 35 and 36, resistor 37, and actuating coil 38 of the up-rudder-solenoidURS. The rudders coupled to yoke 102 and falling in the horizontal plane are thus deflected upwardly. The normal tendency of the torpedo to dive is thus prevented. The resistor 37 has a resistance value so selected or adjusted that the up-rudder force is at a desired value.

It will be noted that the igniter IG for the et propellent is in a circuit including the contacts 59 and the terminals designated To Shore. The T Shore circuit includes a suitable source of potential EB and a shore switch 55. In connection with actual shots made with this type of torpedo, the switch and source of potential were actually located on shore at some considerable distance from the torpedo so as to insure the safety of the personnel making the tests.

The propellent contained in the propulsion motor, once ignited, is extremely violent in action, and the explosive flaming gases issuing from the nozzle are quite dangerous to anyone near the torpedo.

The gyro contactor 63 is also provided with an additional contact 60 for establishing a circuit through coil 61 of the suspension mechanism for the torpedo. When the coil 61 is energized, the latch 62 of the suspension mechanism 54 is tripped and the torpedo is thus free of its mooring or suspension the instant the igniter is actuated.

The timing of the timer motor is such that contacts b close as soon as stable torpedo speed has been established.

Closure of contacts b establishes a circuit from energized conductor 15, contacts 35, conductor 39, contacts b, conductor 40, actuating coil 41 of the normal rudder relay NRR to conductor 13. The normal rudder relay closes contacts 58 shunting resistor 37, thereby fully energizing the solenoid coil 38. However, it does not follow necessarily that coil 38 will be fully energized. For the stable torpedo speed assumed, the depth control apparatus DP will assume its assigned function the moment contacts b are closed.

If at the instant contacts b are closed, the torpedo is operating either at a depth that is too great or is diving at a rate that is too rapid or both, then contacts 36 will be closed and coil 38 will be fully energized to efiect operation of the torpedo at a lesser depth or at a lesser diving angle or both.

When the torpedo arrives at the proper depth, it is apt to overshoot. The instant such action takes place, contacts 42 close, thus energizing coil 43 of the depth relay DR. This relay thereupon opens contacts 36 and closes contacts 44. Closure of contacts 44 fully energizes the coil 45 of the down-rudder solenoid DRS.

Relay DR is alternately energized and deenergized with suitable rapidity so that the torpedo remains at the proper depth.

After the torpedo hits the water, contact wheel 22 is not apt to stay on the insulating strip 23. If it moves to make contact with conducting segment 25, coil 27 is shunted by a circuit through wheel 22 and conductors 46 and 12 to conductor 13.

Deenergization of coil 27 effects the closing of contacts 48 to establish a circuit from conductor 15 through coil 47 of relay SR2 and contacts 48. Operation of the SR2 relay closes contacts 49 to thus energize the coil 50 of the right rudder solenoid RRS. The steering rudders are thus deflected to the right and in consequence the torpedo veers to the right to again bring the wheel 22 and segment 23 in registry to thus reenergize coil 27 and deenergize coils 47 and 50.

Since the wheel 22 and segment 23 are not apt to stay in registry but the wheel 22 is apt to move onto segment 29, coil 31 is thus deenergized by the shunt through wheel 22 and conductors 46 and 12.

Deenergization of coil 31 effects the closing of contacts 51 to thus energize relay SR1. Operation of relay SR1 effects the closing of contacts 52 to thus energize the coil 53 of the left rudder solenoid LRS. The steer ing solenoids are thus alternately energized by the socalled hard-over steering control. The hard-over" steering control produces a slight meandering course of the torpedo but the average course is maintained with surprising accuracy.

The so-called To Shore leads, it will be noted, pass through the jet region of the propellant. A desirable operation is thus obtained. The T0 Shore leads, after the ignition has taken place are burned off therefore removing all potential from the igniter and the contacts 59. The T0 Shore leads thus no more enter into any other function of the electrical control.

My invention is mainly, though not exclusively, at present used for exercise runs of torpedoes and the control is thus devised for the exercise head of a torpedo. It is thus important to retrieve the torpedo after each run.

At or near the end of the exercise run, the timer motor closes contacts c whereupon a circuit is established from a given positive point on the battery through the squib 55 of the CO2 flask F, conductor 56, contacts c, and conductor 57 to the conductor 13.

The CO2 gas from the flask thus expels the ballast liquid from the exercise head making the torpedo buoyant.

A short time after operation of contacts 0, the contacts a' are opened. Opening of contacts d deenergizes coil 10 of the stop relay 11. This stop relay opens its contacts 14, deenergizing the coil 16 of relay 17 and also deenergizes all of the control circuits except the circuit for the timer motor; however, deenergization of coil 16 effects the opening of contacts 18 to thus deenergize the timer motor.

My control, although primarily devised for exercise shots could be used for war shots from surface craft such as destroyers or PT boats without change except for the substitution of a suitable war head in place of the exercise head. Tube launching need not be used. The torpedo could be catapulted from the deck with the jet motor supplying the force for the catapult.

While I have shown but one embodiment of my invention, I do not wish to be limited to the specific showing made but wish to be limited only by the scope of the claims hereto appended.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering control means and substantially conventional depth control means acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric energy for the igniter, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the source of electric energy, and means responsive to a certain operating condition of the steering control means for completing the circuit for the igniter.

2. In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering control means and sub- 'tively, in combination, suspending means stantially conventional depth control means acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders respectively, in combination, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric energy for the igniter, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the source of electric energy, means responsive to a certain operating condition of the steering control means for completing the circuit for the igniter, and means operable at the instant the igniter circuit is completed for positioning the elevator rudders in an up rudder posi tion for a selected time interval.

3. In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering control means and substantially conventional depth control means acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric energy for the igniter, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the source of electric energy, means responsive to a certain operating condition of the steering control means for completing the circuit for the igniter, and means for disconnecting the igniter from the source of electric energy by the firing of the jet propulsion motor.

4. In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering control means and substantially conventional depth control means acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric energy for the igniter, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the source of electric energy, means responsive to a certain operating condition of the steering control means for completing the circuit for the igniter, means operable at the instant the igniter circuit is completed for positioning the elevator rudders in an up-rudder position for a selected time interval, and means for disconnecting the igniter from the source of electric energy by the firing of the jet propulsion motor.

5. In a suspended topedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering control means and substantially conventional depth control means acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, suspending means for the torpedo, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric energy for the igniter, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the source of electric energy, means responsive to a certain operating condition of the steering control means for completing the circuit for the igniter, and means operable at the instant the igniter circuit is completed for releasing the torpedo from its suspension.

6. In a suspended torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering control means and substantially conventional depth control means acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, suspending means for the torpedo, a jet propulsion motorfor the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric energy for the igniter, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the source of electric energy, means responsive to a certain operating condition of the steering control means for completing the circuit for the igniter, means operable at the instant the igniter circuit is completed for positioning the elevator rudders in an up-rudder position for a selected time interval, and means operable at the instant the igniter circuit is completed for releasing the torpedo from its suspension.

7. In a suspended torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering control means and substantially conventional depth control means acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respecfor the torpedo, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric energy for the igniter, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the source of electric energy, means responsive to a certain operating condition of the steering control means for completing the circuit for the igniter, means for disconnecting the igniter from the source of electric energy by the firing of the jet propulsion motor, and means operable at the instant the igniter circuit is completed for releasing the torpedo from its suspension.

8. In a suspended torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering control means and substantially conventional depth control means acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, suspending means for the torpedo, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric energy for the igniter, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the source of electric energy, means responsive to a certain operating condition of the steering control means for completing the circuit for the igniter, means operable at the instant the igniter circuit is completed for positioning the elevator rudders in an up-rudder position for a selected time in terval, means for disconnecting the igniter from the source of electric energy by the firing of the jet propulsion motor, and means operable at the instant the igniter circuit is completed for releasing the torpedo from its suspension.

9. In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering means, including steering rudders, and substantially conventional depth control means, including elevator rudders, acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric potential for the igniter, an exercise head for the torpedo containing ballast liquid, means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head, control circuits, a second source of potential interconnected with the first source of potential, a timer motor for effecting changes in said control in timer sequence, means operable when the torpedo is to be set in operation for connecting the timer motor to said second source of potential, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the first source of potential, means responsive to a given operation of the timer motor for completing the circuit for the igniter, and means operable by the timer motor after a predetermined time of operation of the jet propulsion motor for effecting the operation of the means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head.

In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering means, including steering rudders, and substantially conventional depth control means, including elevator rudders, acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric potential for the igniter, an exercise head for the torpedo containing ballast liquid, means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head, control circuits, 3. second source of potential interconnected with the first source of potential, a timer motor for efiecting changes in said control in timer sequence, means operable when the torpedo is to be set in operation for connecting the timer motor to said second source of potential, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the first source of potential, means responsive to a given operation of the timer motor for completing the circuit for the igniter, means set in operation by the timer motor at substantially the instant the igniter circuit is completed for positioning the elevator rudders in an up-rudder position for a selected time interval, and means operable by the timer motor after a predetermined time of operation of the jet propulsion motor for effecting the operation of the gneajns for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise 11. In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering means, including steering rudders, and substantially conventional depth control means, including elevator rudders, acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combinafor the torpedo, an igniter potential for the igniter, an exercise head for the torpedo containing ballast liquid, means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise potential, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the first source of potential, means responsive to a given operation of the timer motor for completing the circuit for the igniter, means set in operation by the timer motor at substantially the instant the igniter circuit is completed for positioning the elevator rudders in an uprudder position for a selected time interval, means for severing the leads of the igniter, leading to said remote control point, at the torpedo by the firing of the propulsion motor, and means operable by the timer motor after a predetermined time of operation of the jet propulsion motor for effecting the operation of the means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head.

12. In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering means, including steering rudders, and substantially conventional depth control means, including elevator rudders, acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric potential for the igniter, an exercise head for the torpedo containing ballast liquid, means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head, control circuits, a second source of potential interconnected with the first source of potential, a timer motor for effecting changes in said control in timer sequence, means operable when the torpedo is to be set in operation for connecting the timer motor to said second source of potential, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the first source of potential, means responsive to a given operation of the timer motor for completing the circuit for the igniter, means for severing the leads of the igniter, leading to said remote control point, at the torpedo by the firing of the propulsion motor, and means operable by the timer motor after a predetermined time of operation of the jet propulsion motor for elTecting the operation of the means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head.

13. In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering means, including steering rudders, and substantially conventional depth control means, including elevator rudders, acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, releasable retaining means for retaining the torpedo in fixed position at the firing base, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric potential for the igniter, an exercise head for the torpedo containing ballast liquid, means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head, control circuits, a second source of potential interconnected with the first source of potential, a timer motor for efiecting changes r circuit between the igniter and the first source of potential,

means responsive to a given operation of the timer motor for completing the circuit for the igniter, means, subject to the controlling efiect of the timer motor, operable the instant the igniter circuit is completed for operating said releasing means to release the torpedo from its fixed position at the firing base, and means operable by the timer motor after a predetermined time of operation of the jet propulsion motor for efiecting the operation of the Iriieains for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise 14. In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering means, including steering rudders, and substantially conventional depth control means, including elevator rudders, acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combina-. tion, releasable retaining means for retaining the torpedo in fixed position at the firing base. a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric potential for the igniter, an exercise head for the torpedo containing ballast liquid, means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head, control circuits, a second source of potential interconnected with the first source of potential, a timer motor for effecting changes in said control in timed sequence, means operable when the torpedo is to be set in operation for connecting the timer motor to said second source of potential, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the first source of potential, means responsive to a given operation of the timer motor for Completing the circuit for the igniter, means set in operation by the timer motor at substantially the instant the igniter circuit is completed for positioning the elevator rudders in an up-rudder position for a selected time interval, means subject to the controlling efiectpf the timer motor, operable the instant the igniter circuit is completed for operating said releasing means to release the torpedo from its fixed position at the firing base, and means operable by the timer motor after a predetermined time of operation of the jet propulsion motor for effecting the operation of the means for expelling'the ballast liquid from the exercise head.

15.111 a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering means, including steering rudders, and substantially conventional depth control means, including elevator rudders, acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, releasable retaining means for retaining the torpedo in fixed position at the firing base, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric potential for the igniter, an exercise head for the torpedo containing ballast liquid, means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head, control circuits, :1 second source of potential interconnected with the first source of potential, a timer motor for effecting changes in said control in timed sequence, means operable when the torpedo is to be set in operation for connecting the timer motor to said second source of potential, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing a partial circuit between the igniter and the first source of potential, means responsive to a given operation of the timer motor for completing the circuit for the igniter, means for severing the leads of the igniter, leading to said remote control point, at the torpedo by the firing of the propulsion motor, means, subject to the controlling effect of the timer motor, operable the instant the igniter circuit is completed for operating said releasing means to release the torpedo from its fixed position at the firing base, and means operable by the timer motor after a predetermined time of operation of. the jet propulsion motor for effecting the operation of the means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head.

16. In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering means, including steering rudders, and substantially conventional depth control means, including elevator rudders, acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, releasable retaining means for retaining the torpedo in fixed position at the firing base, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric potential for the igniter, an exercise head for the torpedo containing ballast liquid, means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head, control circuits, a second source of potential interconnected with the first source of potential, a timer motor for effecting changes in said control in timed sequence, means operable when the torpedo is to be set in operation for connecting the timer motor to said second source of potential, switching means remote from the torpedo for establishing, a partial circuit between the igniter and the first source of potential, means responsive to a given operation of the timer motor for completing the circuit for the igniter, means set in operation by the timer motor at substantially the instant the igniter circuit is completed for positioning the elevator rudders in an rip-rudder position for a selected time interval, means for severing the leads of the igniter, leading to said remote control point, at the torpedo by the firing of. the propulsion motor. means, subject to the controlling effect of the timer motor, operable the instant the igniter circuit is completed for operating said releasing means to release the torpedo from its fixed position at the firing base, and means operable by the timer motor after a predetermined time of operation of the jet propulsion motor for effecting the operation of the means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head.

17. In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering means, including steering rudders, and substantially conventional depth control means, including elevator rudders, acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in cornbina tion, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric potential for the igniter, an exercise head for the torpedo containing ballast liquid, means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head, control circuits, a second source of potential interconnected with the first source of potential, a timer motor for effecting changes in said control in timed for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head.

18. In a torpedo having substantially conventional gyroscopically controlled steering means, including steering rudders, and substantially conventional depth control means, including elevator rudders, acting on the steering rudders and elevator rudders, respectively, in combination, a jet propulsion motor for the torpedo, an igniter therefor, a source of electric potential for the igniter, an exercise head for the torpedo containing ballast liquid,

means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head, control circuits,

a second source of potential interpleted for positioning the elevator rudders in an uprudder position for a selected time interval and by a selected force, means for severing the leads of the igniter, leading to said remote releasing means to release the torpedo from its fixed position at the firing base, and means operable by the timer motor after a predetermined time of operation of the jet propulsion motor for effecting the operation of the means for expelling the ballast liquid from the exercise head.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3120209 *Nov 23, 1960Feb 4, 1964Rohrig George WTorpedo power circuit
US3779194 *Sep 27, 1956Dec 18, 1973Kahn LMarine missiles for destruction of submarine targets
US7192066Sep 9, 2003Mar 20, 2007Intier Automotive Closures Inc.Power actuator for automotive closure latch
US7347146 *Apr 25, 2005Mar 25, 2008The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavySupercavitating projectile with propulsion and ventilation jet
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/20.1, 114/24, 114/238
International ClassificationF42B19/10, F41G7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41G7/00, F41G2700/005
European ClassificationF41G7/00