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Publication numberUS2707527 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 3, 1955
Filing dateMay 23, 1952
Priority dateMay 23, 1952
Publication numberUS 2707527 A, US 2707527A, US-A-2707527, US2707527 A, US2707527A
InventorsGeorge A Brace
Original AssigneeHoover Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible suction cleaner
US 2707527 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 3, 1955 G. A. BRAcE 2,707,527

coLLAPsIBLE sUcTIoN CLEANER Filed May 23. 1952 A l 5 sheets-sheet 1 lllllrnl 54 556 FIG.6

INVENTOR.' GEORGE A. BRACE www. @uw

ATT'Y 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 23, 1952 INVENTOR.' GEORGE A. BRACE 52W/3M ATT'Y May 3, 1955 G. A. BRACE coLLAPsIBLE sucTIoN CLEANER Filed May 25, 1952 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. 3

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winnt IIIII May 3, 1955 G. A. BRAcE 2,707,527

COLLAPSIBLE SUCTION CLEANER Filed Hay 23, 1952 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 6 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I' \Q\\).\\W 6 4Q 42 INVENTOR: 43

GEORGE A. BRACE ATT'Y May 3, 1955 G. A. BRAcE 2,707,527

COLLAPSIBLE SUCTION CLEANER Filed May 23, 1952 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. 9

I 6g: e? 68 65 'v Y INVENToR: GEORGE A. BRACE United States Patent() "i CLLA'PSIBLE SUCTION CLEANER George A. Brace, VHighland Park, lll., assigner to The Hoover Company, North Canton, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application May 23, 1952, Serial No. 289,640v

23 Claims. (Ci. 1553-37) This invention relates to suction cleaners and more parv ticularly to a unique construction which collapses when `not in use into a very compact unit. The cleaner is readily and easily extendable to provide ample space for an enclosed full size filtering chamber of high efficiency and large dirt storage capacity.

Many `attempts have been made heretofore to provide a smaller, lighter suction cleaner which requires less storage space by a great variety of arrangements of the essential component elements. However, whenever greater compactness has been achieved, it has been at the sacri- I tice of efiiciency and the utilization of undersized components incapable of permorming the required functions adequately. i

The present novel design avoids the numerous disadvantages and shortcomings of prior designs and yet provides a cleaner which is far more compact as well as one which operates at the same efficiency as standard size conventional cleaners. vln general, these objectives are achieved by the adoption of.a collapsible filter chamber which automatically extends into a full size filtering cham- `ber when the cleaner is in use. At all other times the filter chamber collapses against the suction unit providing a self-contained cleaner of unusual compactness requiring a minimum of storage space. Included in the design are numerous novel and advantageous features. Thus, the suction unit which accounts vfor the major portion of the total weight is positioned in the base closely adjacent the floor with the motor surmounting the fan in the interest of maximum utilization of space. The

cleaner casing is madein two or more sections which nest when the filter is collapsed and which are easily and quickly extendable to the normal operating position. Movement to the extended position is preferably accomplished automatically upon the release of a latch holding the filter chamber collapsed.l This same latch means also functions to hold the filter extended in a positive manner despite the sub-atmospheric pressure tending to collapse the chamber during operation of the suction unit.

.Still other features include a control switch positioned to be operated 4by the users toe and arranged to be con- "5 cealed when the cleaner is not in use. The casing is also provided with skids along the side which are brought into use merely by turning the cleaner onto the side provided with the skids. These skids are arranged ,to serve as a convenient carrying handle for the cleaner when it is not supported on the skids. Another feature involves a simple construction for converting to lcleaning or spraying by blowing action.

Accordingly, it is the object of this invention to provide a unique suction cleaner having the various features and advantages suggested above and others which will become apparent from the following specification of an illustrative embodiment and from the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure l is a perspective view of the cleaner collapsed for storage;

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2,707,527 Patented May 3, 1955 ICC Figure 2 is a vertical sectional view through the cleaner with the filter extended to its operating position;

Figure 3 is a similar View with the filter in its collapsed storage position;

Figure 4 is a cross-sectional view along the line 4-4 on Figure 2; v

Figure 5 is a fragmentary sectional view along the line 5--5 on Figure 4; Figure 6 is a partial side view of the lower casing section along line 6-6 on Figure 4;

Figure 7 Vis a fragmentary view of the motor switch along line 7-7von Figure 6;

Figure 8 is a sectional view of the converter tool along line 8-8 on Figure 9;

Figure 9 is a fragmentary view of the cleaner converted.

to use for cleaning by blowing;

' Figure l0 is a side View of the cleaner when in its extended position and supported on its skids; and

,Figure ll is an end view of the cleaner taken from the right hand side of Figure l0.

The suction cleaner constituting this invention is housed within a casing having a lower base section 10 and an upper section 11. As herein shown, these casing sections are `substantiailly square in cross-section but it will be obvious that they may be cylindrical or of any other desired shape. The top of the lower section is flared outwardly to `provide a tubular bearing and guide surface 12 over which the upper section 11 is freely slidable. Wall portion 12 is connected to the main body of the lower` section by a horizontal flange 13 to the lower surface -of which a hollow flexible gasket 14 may be secured in any suitable manner. The inner vertical wall of 'this gasket may be provided with one or more air inlet passageways 1S in order that atmospheric air may enter or escape for reasons which will become apparent below. Base section 10 is provided with an integral bottom 16 on which the cleaner may be supported during storage as well as during the cleaning operation if this mode of use is preferred by the operator.

The upper casing section 11 is open at both ends and its internal cross-section is slightly greater than the outer cross-section of portion 12 of the base section. The lower end 17 of the upper section is shaped as clearly shown in Figure 2. The vertically disposed lip 18 is closely spaced from the outer wall of the lower section and, together with wall 12, serves as a bearing and guide surface for the upper section as it is raised and lowered with respect to the lower section. Likewise, the horizontal shoulder 19 contacts the under surface of gasket 14 and cooperates therewith to form an airtight seal between the Lipper and lower sections when the cleaner is in use.

The unitary motor-fan assembly 20 includes an electric motor 21 and a multiple stage suction fan 22 directly coupled to the lower end of the motor shaft. An annular flange 23 circling the base of the motor is cradled between a pair of rubber rings 24 which are secured toa flange 25 mounted within the lower casing section and rigidly secured thereto by screws 26. Immediately overlying this motor mounting is a second ring 27 which serves as a support for the conical final filter assembly 28. This filter may be detacliably secured to ring 27 in any suitable manner so that it can be removed from the upper end of the casing for cleaning or for inspection or servicing of the motor-fan unit.

The upper casing section 11 forms a collapsible housing for the filter chamber as will be readily understood by reference to Figures 2 and 3. Secured to the top of section 11 by any suitable means is a filter seating ring 29. Removably seated on this ring is a filter bag ring 30 having an outturned flange carrying a rubber gasket 31. The filter bag proper 32 of any suitable air pervious material has an outer wall conforming to the shape of the cleaner' casing and a rc-entrant bottom 33 shaped to have its apex seated on the top of the nal filter 23 in the manner shown. Surrounding the filter bag is a compression spring 34 having its upper end seated against flange 29 and its lower end resting on shoulder 13 of the lower casing section. it will therefore be clear that this spring tends to hold the upper casing section fully extended so that shoulder 19 is firmly seated against the inside of gasket 14 in order to insure that the casing sections are held in their fully extended position.

It is preferable to provide one or more latch devices generally indicated at 35. In their simplest form, these latches comprise a spring strip 36 having one end firmly riveted to lip 13 of the upper casing section. The other free end of the strip carries a detent 37 which projects freely through opening 38 in lip 13 and into opening 39 of section to lock the casing in its fully extended position. Casing section lil is provided with a pair of openings 40 at its lower end in which pins 37 automatically seat; then the upper section is collapsed to the storage c position illustrated in Figure 3. So long as the latch detents are seated in openings dit, the upper section is held locked in its storage position in opposition to compression spring 34. Latches 35 are, of course, easily released by pulling their free ends outwardly to disengage detents 37 from either openings 39 or openings 4G.

The filter casing is normally closed by a removable cover 41 which is releasably held in assembled position by a pair of toggle clamps 42 of any conventional design mounted on the opposite upper sides of casing section 11. Cover 41 is provided with a suction hose coupling socket 4Z which is preferably disposed near one side of the cover so that its inner end does not strike the final filter in the collapsed position of the cleaner. Coupling 42 may be provided with a bayonet joint or other suitable means for releasably holding the hose in place. It may also be provided with a valve or liap member which is normally urged toward closed position by a spring or by gravity. This flap may be arranged to be opened by the insertion of the hose or to open only in response to the suction of the motor-fan unit when in operation. The purpose of the valve is, of course, to prevent dirt escaping from the filter chamber when the hose is not connected thereto or when the cleaner is not in operation.

When in use, the cleaner may be supported on its base 16 and operated in the upright position. Or if preferred, the cleaner may be turned over on its side and supported on runners or skids. These skids preferably comprise a U-shaped runner 43 having its legs secured to lower section lfb very close to the base. The same side of the upper section is provided with a pair of U- shaped runners dfi- 44 having their ends pivotally supported in brackets 45. Runners 44 are preferably shaped in the manner illustrated in Figure l so that when they are rotated outwardly away from one another, their floor contacting portions 46-46 converge toward one end of the casing. When the runners are so disposed and the cleaner is pulled in a direction parallel to its axis, runners 46 tend to wipe across the nap ofthe carpet in a band many times wider than the width of the skids themselves. When so arranged, it has been found that the runners leave no tracks or marks in the carpet in sharp contrast with the results obtained when the runners are arranged parallel to one another. The supporting legs of runners 44 are so shaped and disposed that, when the runners are pivoted towards one another, the carpet contacting portions of runners 46 close against one another as indicated by the dot and dash lines in Figure l to provide a convenient and comfortable carrying handle for the cleaner.

The manner in which the air flow takes place through the cleaner will now be described. The dirty air stream enters through the usual flexible hose directly into the top of the filter bag. The air then passes through the walls of the filter bag, through final filter Z8 and over and through driving motor 21 from which it passes by way of openings 48 into the fan inlet 49, The air then passes through the first stage of the fan, radially inward through the interstage 50 and into the inlet for the second stage 51. The air exhaust from the fan casing through opening 52 and flows counter-clockwise about the fan casing from which it exists through louvered openings 53 disposed on three sides of the casing.

The fourth side of the casing is provided with a normally closed blower outlet 54 as will be best understood by reference to Figures 4, 6 and 9. Port 54 is closed by a valve 55 slidably supported in guides 55a and is normally held in the nearly closed position shown in Figure 6 by a compression spring 56 encircling a supporting guide rod 57. A stop 55!) formed at the forward ends of guides 55a prevents the valve 54 from moving to its fully closed position as is made clear by Figure 6 for a purpose which will be explained shortly.

When the user wishes to clean by blowing action, it is merely necessary to connect the flexible hose 58 to a converter tool 59. The end of this tool has a beveled end as shown in Figure 9, and the longer side 60 is flat. The opposite shorter wall 61 is provided with a depression 62 into which the forward lip 63 of valve plate 54 moves to latch the converter in place in the cleaner. The innermost end 63 of the converter engages behind tab 64 of the cleaner to firmly anchor this end of the converter in place. As is made clear by Figures 4 and 9, tab 64 is struck from vertical partition 65 extending between the casing and the fan casing. This partition is provided with an opening 66 through which the air normally flows in its passage to the diffuser openings 53. However, when the converter is in place, its flat side wall 60 lies flush across the opening 66 and causes all the air exhausting from the fan to flow outwardly through converter 59 and flexible hose 58.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that the pointed forward end of the converter is easily inserted into the gap between partition 65 and the forward edge 55e of valve 54. As a consequence of the inclined end of the converter, insertion of the beveled end of the converter into this gap forces the valve open in opposition to spring 56. As end 63 of the converter seats behind tab 64, lip 55e of the valve seats in depression 62 and locks the converter in place in the cleaner. The converter is disconnected from the cleaner simply by grasping knob 67 and sliding the valve plate out of depression 62.

Another feature of the invention is the location of the control switch for the motor-fan unit in a position from which it may be conveniently operated by the operators toe. Thus, the corner side wall of the lower casing section 10 is depressed inwardly to provide a shelf 68 on which a push-push switch 69 of conventional design is supported. In consequence, switch button 70 is positioned very close to the floor and readily accessible for depression by the operators toe. It will, of course, be understood that the push-push switch is of the type which opens and closes upon successive depressions of the control button.

Operation Normally the cleaner will be in the collapsed or storage position illustrated in Figure l. To place the cleaner in operation, the operator pulls outwardly on the spring strip 35 to release detent 37 from opening 40. As soon as this occurs, compression spring 34 elevates the upper casing section 11 to the fully extended position illustrated in Figure 2. It is automatically latched in this position by latch 35 when detent 37 falls into opening 39. Openings 15 on the inner periphery of gasket 14 will then be in communication with the outside atmosphere by way of the passageway existing between flange 18 and the outer wall of the lower casing section. The opposite outer wall of the gasket, being exposed to the interior low pressure area of the filter chamber, is subject to the reduced pressure within the filter chamber when the .cleaner is operating. Since openings `permit atmospheric pressure conditions to exist within gasket 14, it -will be apparent that the pressure differential across the wall yof the gasket assists in maintaining a tight air .seal between the upper and lower sections of the cleaner casing.

The .operator then inserts the male end of a exible -hose 58 into .coupling 42 at the top of the filter chamber and steps on control button 70 of the push-push switch to yplace the motor-fan unit in operation.

The cleaner may be operated in the upright position or, if preferred, the skids 44-44 may be folded outwardly and the cleaner then turned over on its side and pulled about the room on skids 43, 44 by means of the suction hose in the customary manner. The dirty air flowing into the filter bag passes through the side wall of the yfilter in the usual manner leaving the dirt col lected in the bag. The clean air then passes through the final filter 48 and over the motor to cool it after which the air passes through the multiple stage fan and exhausts into the base of the cleaner from which it exits by way of the louvered air diffuser openings 53.

When a quantity of dirt has been collected in the filter, the toggle clamps 4Z are opened permitting end cap 41 to'be removed. Removal ofthe end cap releases the filter bag which may be lifted from the cleaner and emptied in the usual manner. After being cleaned, the filter bag is returned and the end cap Vis clamped in place.

If it is desired to use the cleaner as a source of air under pressure, the operator removes the hose from coupling 42 and inserts it in converter device 59. The bevelled end of this converter is then inserted into the converter passageway at the base of the cleaner thereby opening valve 55 until lip '5 5c latches the converter in place. Insertion of the converter not only opens the valve but its fiat side wall 60 closes oft air port 66 and confines the air discharged by the fan to fiow outwardly through hose 58 under considerable pressure and velocity. This air may be used for moth-proofing, painting, hair drying and a variety of cleaning operations not properly handled by suction cleaning methods.

After the operator has finished using the cleaner, she merely pulls the free end of latch outwardly and lowers the upper section of the cleaner to its collapsed position in opposition to spring 34. As the upper section is fully telescoped over the lower section, detents 37 engage in openings to latch the casing in its collapsed position. Skids 44-44 are then folded towards one another until sections 46-46 contact one another to provide a convenient carrying handle for the cleaner.

As will be readily apparent from Figure 3, the telescoping of the two casing sections causes the filter 32 to collapse into the compact form illustrated. Sufficient space remains on the interior of the bag to accommodate a limited amount of dirt. However, should the operator attempt to collapse the casing when the bag contains any sizable quantity of dirt, difficulty will be encounteredas is desirable because it encourages the operator to empty the filter bag frequently and before storing the cleaner. This insures that the filter will be in clean condition in readiness for the next cleaning operation. It has the further advantage of preventing the operator from neglecting to empty the filter as often as desirable for more efficient operation of the cleaner and of the filter bag.

From time to time, it is desirable to recondition the final filter. With the construction described above, this is a simple operation and is done while the main filter bag is removed. At this time, the final filter cone 28 may be lifted from the casing and cleaned in any desired manner and then replaced. When the final filter is removed, it is a simple matter for the operator to inspect the motor for cleaning and servicing. If, for any reason, it is desirable to remove the motor-fan unit, this may be 56 done by removing final lter ring 27 and screws 26 holding the motor-fan unit in place in the casing.

Various changes in the structure and arrangement of parts will be readily apparent in view of the foregoing description of an illustrative embodiment of the invention. For example, spring 34 may be omitted together with its functions. in this case, it is necessary for the operator to manually elevate the upper section as latches 35 are released from openings 40. If spring 34 is omitted, it may be desirable to use latches which must beF manually closed and opened.

It will also be obvious that the cloth filter bag may be replaced or used in combination with a disposable paper filter which is thrown away after each cleaning foperation and replaced with a clean bag. Still another variation coming within the scope of the invention is the substitution of an airtight tlexiblewalled upper casing section of fabric or the like in lieu of metal casing 11. ln this event, sliding rods or their equivalent should be provided between the tops of the two casing sections for holding the filter chamber in its extended position while the fan is operating. Such a means might comprise a stiffer compression spring in lieu of spring 34. Still other variations and alterations will be readily recognized as coming within the scope and spirit of this invention.

While I have shown and described but one embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that that embodiment is to be taken as illustrative only and not in a limiting sense. I do not wish to be limited to the particular structure shown and described but to include all equivalent variations except as limited by the scope of the claims.

I claim:

l. A suction cleaner comprising, a base casing section, a top casing section arranged to telescope over the base section, said top section being adapted to move between an extended position and a collapsed position in which said base section is nested within said top section, spring means normally urging said sections apart and to the extended positions thereof, aimotor-fan unit resiliently supported in said base section with the motor surmounting said fan, a final filter closely superimposed about said motor, an open topped filter bag enclosed by said top casing section, means removably supporting the open end of said bag adjacent the upper end of said top section, a cover for said top section giving access to said filter bag, and an air inlet hose coupling opening into the open end of said filter bag.

2. A suction cleaner as dened in claim l wherein the fan of said motorfan unit is provided with an air inlet opening on its upper side at a point between said motor and said fan, said fan having a discharge opening exhausting into said base section, said base section having a plurality of distributed air discharge openings in cornmunication with said fan discharge opening.

3. A suction cleaner as defined in claim 2 wherein said base section is provided with a normally closed hose coupling through the side wall of said section, said coupling having an opening therein through which the air discharging from said fan passes on its way to the air discharge openings in said base section, the opening in said coupling being adapted to be closed when a hose is seated in said hose coupling so that the air discharged by said fan flows through said coupling.

4. In combination, an elongated suction cleaner casing enclosing a dirt filtering chamber and a motor-driven suction unit, means for supporting said casing for convenient movement over a carpet, said supporting means including a pair of runners having their opposite ends pivotally connected to said casing between a spaced apart, cleaner supporting position and a second position in which said runners abut one another to provide a carrying handle for said cleaner.

5. The combination defined in claim 4 wherein said runners lie in a common plane parallel to the floor when in their cleaner supporting position and wherein they converge toward one end of said cleaner when so positioned, said pivotal connection between said runners and said cleaner casing being arranged so that said converging runners lie parallel to one another when pivoted to said second position and mutually cooperate in providing said cleaner carrying handle.

6. In combination, a suction cleaner casing having a dirt filtering chamber and a power-driven suction unit therewithin, means for supporting said casing for convenient movement over a carpet comprising a pair of runners, means pivotally connecting the ends of said runners to said casing so that said runners can be pivoted toward and away from said casing and between a position in which they lie in spaced apart relation to provide a wide based support for said cleaner and a second position in which portions of said runners abut one another and mutually cooperate in providing a carrying handle for said cleaner.

7. The combination dened in claim 6 in which said runners and the pivotal connections therefor are formed so that the ends of said runners at one end of said casing diverge from one another more than the other ends thereof as said runners are moved away from the said handle forming position to their cleaner supporting position.

8. In combination, a suction cleaner comprising a casing structure having a part thereof movable between an extended operating position and a collapsed storage position, a dirt filter supported in said casing and housed at least in part in the movable part of the casing, means for coupling a suction nozzle to the casing to discharge dirt-laden air into the liltcr, a motor-fan unit housed in the casing and arranged to draw air from the coupling means into and through the filter to the fan, and means for holding said casing in the extended position thereof when the cleaner is in use.

9. In combination, a suction cleaner comprising, a two part main casing having overlapping ends arranged to permit one part of the casing to telescope within the other part, a dirt filtering means mounted within one of said parts and adapted to collapse into a compact storage position when said casing parts are tclescoped together and to be extended to provide a large capacity dirt storage and filtering chamber when said casing parts are in their extended cleaner operating position, means for conveying a dirt-laden air stream into the dirt iiltering means, a motor driven suction fan mounted in the other of the casing parts and arranged to draw air through the conveying means into and through the tltcr to the interior of the casing and thence into the fan, and means for holding the easing parts in extended position against the suction force of the fan.

10. The combination dclined in claim 9 including rcsilicnt gasket means carried by one of said casing parts and positioned to cooperate with the other casing part to provide an air seal between said teiescoping casing parts when said casings are in their extended position.

ll. In combination, a suction cleaner comprising, a casing formed by two cup-shaped housings arranged to have their open ends telescope together to provide a compact cleaner for storage purposes and a readily extensible cleaner casing when the cleaner is in use, a filter bag mounted within said cleaner casing and adapted to occupy a major portion of one of said housings when the cleaner is in use, means for conducting a dirt-laden air stream into the interior of the filter bag, a motor-driven suction producing means mounted within the other of said housings and arranged to draw air through the conducting means into and through the filter into the said one housing and thence to the suction producing means, and means for holding said housings selectively in their extended position or in their collapsed position.

l2. The combination dciined in claim ll including spring means supported between said cup-shaped housings and arranged to urge the same to their extended positions.

13. The combination delined in claim ll wherein the bottom of the cup-shaped housing enclosing said tilter bag is separable to provide access to said filter bag, clampping means normally holding said bottom in place and for holding said filter bag in place in said cleaner casing while releasing the same for removal from said casing when said bottom is released.

14. The combination defined in claim 1l wherein the cup-shaped housing for said suction means is provided with a depression, a motor control switch mounted in said depression, the arrangement being such that said switch is concealed when said casing is in its collapsed position and is exposed when said casing is in the extended position thereof.

15. Apparatus according to claim 11 wherein said gasket has one side thereof in communication with the exterior atmospheric air and the opposite side thereof exposed to the sub-amospheric pressure conditions prevailing interiorly of said casing when the cleaner is in use, the arrangement being such that the subatmospheric pressure condition within said casing acts to expand and seal said gasket between the juxtaposed surfaces of said tubular members to prevent the entrance of air between said members.

16. Apparatus according to claim 1l wherein the telescoping ends of said casing parts are provided with complementarily formed shoulders arranged to lie in close proximity to one another when said casing parts are in the extended position thereof, and a resilient gasket secured to one of said shoulders and cooperating with the other to provide an airtight seal therebetween when said parts are in their extended position.

17. Apparatus according to claim 16 including manually operable detent means carried by one of said casing parts and arranged to interlock with the other of said parts to hold the same in either their extended or their collapsed positions as desired.

1S. In combination, a suction cleaner comprising, a casing formed by two cup-shaped housings arranged to have their open ends telescope together to provide a compact cleaner for storage purposes and a readily extensible cleaner casing when the cleaner is in use, a motordriven suction means mounted within one of said housings, a filter bag mounted within said cleaner casing and adapted to occupy a major portion of the other of said housings when the cleaner is in use, the bottom of the cupshaped housing enclosing said tilter bag being separable to provide access to said tilter bag, clamping means normally holding said bottom in place and for holding said filter bag in place in said cleaner casing while releasing the same for removal from said casing when said bottom is released, means for holding said housings selectively in their extended position or in their collapsed position, and means for conducting a dirt-lader air stream into said filter bag.

19. In combination, a suction cleaner comprising, a casing formed by two cup-shaped housings arranged to have their open ends telescope together to provide a compact cleaner when the cleaner is in use, a motor driven suction means mounted within one of said housings, a filter bag mounted within said cleaner casing and adapted to occupy a major portion of the other of said housings when the cleaner is in use, the cup-shaped housing for said suction means being provided with a depression, a motor control switch mounted in said depression, the arrangement being such that said switch is concealed when said casing is in its collapsed position and is exposed when said casing is in the extended position thereof, means for holding said housings selectively in their extended position or in their collapsed position, and means for conducting a dirt-laden air stream into said tilter bag.

20. ln combination, a suction cleaner comprising a casing providing a large capacity lter chamber in one position thereof, said filter enclosing portion being collapsible toward the remainder of said casing when said cleaner is not in use and being movable away therefrom to an extended position when said cleaner is in use, a lter bag removably supported within said collapsible portion of the casing and being collapsible along with said collapsible portion of the casing, means for conducting a dirtladen air stream into the lter bag, a suction producing unit in the casing arranged to draw air from the interior of the collapsible porton of the casing around the filter to produce a flow of air through the dirt-laden air conducting means into and through the lter into the collapsible portion of the casing, and means for holding said collapsible portion of the casing in said extended position when said cleaner is in use.

21. The combination dened in claim 20 including a compression spring encircling said lter bag and arranged to resiliently hold said collapsible casing portion in the extended position thereof when said cleaner is in use.

22. The combination dened in claim 21 including means for holding said collapsible casing portion in the collapsed position thereof in oppostion to said spring when said cleaner is not in use.

23. In a suction cleaner having a motor-driven suction unit and a dirt lter, means for conducting a dirtladen air stream to said dirt filter, discharge means for exhausting cleaned air from said cleaner, a port in said discharge means providing for entry of a tubular air conduit thereinto, a valve member for said port, spring means normally biasing said valve member to close the port, means on the tubular air conduit for moving the valve to open position as the tubular air conduit is inserted into the port, and a notch on the tubular air conduit which moves into registry with the valve when the tubular air conduit is fully inserted in the port to be engaged by the valve moving under the bias of the spring means to latch the tubular air conduit, and manual means for moving the valve against the spring bias to release the tubular air conduit.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,412,912 Bain Apr. 18, 1922 1,707,841 Broadfoot Apr. 2, 1929 2,027,158 Forsberg Jan. 7, 1936 2,532,933 Nutfer Dec. 5, 1950 2,597,690 Wied May 20, 1952 2,605,858 Lang Aug. 5, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 625,140 Great Britain June 22, 1949

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Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3286446 *Aug 27, 1963Nov 22, 1966Singer CoMultiuse canister type vacuum cleaner
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Classifications
U.S. Classification55/357, 55/DIG.200, 15/347, 55/DIG.300, 55/378, 55/385.1, 220/8, 55/372
International ClassificationA47L11/33, A47L5/36
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/33, A47L11/4044, A47L11/4091, A47L11/4027, Y10S55/03, Y10S55/02, A47L11/4013, A47L11/40, A47L5/365, A47L11/4072
European ClassificationA47L11/40D, A47L11/40K, A47L11/40P, A47L11/40F6, A47L11/40, A47L11/40E, A47L11/33, A47L5/36B