Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2707874 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 10, 1955
Filing dateMar 1, 1951
Priority dateMar 18, 1950
Publication numberUS 2707874 A, US 2707874A, US-A-2707874, US2707874 A, US2707874A
InventorsGlover Jr William C
Original AssigneeBill Glover Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Garment spotting machine
US 2707874 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 10, 1955 w. c. GLOVER, JR

GARMENT SPOTTING MACHINE Original Filedv March 18 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 JNVENTOR. WAY/Mm 6. 6701 6); Jr:

Iii/@465? May 10, 1955 w. 9:. GLOVER, JR 2,707,874 GARMENT SPOTTING MACHINE Original Filed March 18, 1950 a shets sneet s INVENTOR. lV/Y/l'd/W C G/oye; Jl. BY

United States Patent GARMENT SPOTTING MACHINE William C. Glover, Jr., Kansas City, Mo., assignor to Bill Glover, Incorporated, a corporation of Missouri Original application March 18, 1950, Serial No. 150,504,

now Patent No. 2,670,621, dated March 2, 1954. Di- ;ilded and this application March 1, 1951, Serial No.

9 Claims. (Cl. 68-5) The present invention relates in general to the removal of spots from fabrics and it deals more particularly with the construction of an improved spotting machine to be used for this purpose.

This application is a division of my co-pending application Serial No. 150,504, filed March 18, 1950, which issued into Letters Patent 2,670,621 on March 2, 1954.

It is the object of the invention broadly speaking to provide a machine which places at the disposal of its operator means for dealing with practically every kind of spot or stain encountered in laundry and dry cleaning practice, a machine which makes possible the removal of all such spots in the most expeditious and satisfactory manner.

To this end it is another important objectto provide in a single machine a plurality of work surfaces which differ in size, shape, location and drainage or discharge facilities whereby spotting problems of many and widely differing types may be dealt with conveniently and rapidly by the operator.

A further object is to provide the foregoing work surfaces in such physical relationship that they may be used without interference, all of them, however, being readily accessible and being adjustable in position to suit the convenience of the operator.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide at least one work surface which is foraminous and has means for drawing a suction therethrough, which suction means is automatically rendered effective when the sur face is put into use and rendered inactive when the use is discontinued.

A feature of the invention resides in the provision of main and auxiliary spotting tables in close proximity on the machine, each of said tables having both perforate and imperforate work surfaces; another feature resides in the unique construction of the tables which makes them peculiarly suited to the work for which they are designed. Still another feature is the provision of a novel basket which, in the course of treating a portion of a garment on either spotting table, protects the balance of the garment against injury.

Another object of my invention is to provide a spotting machine having facilities for treating a fabric disposed on any work surface with dry steam, wet steam, cold water or hot air at will. More particularly it is an object to provide a gun operable at will to discharge a spray of cold water, and a second gun selectively operable to discharge dry steam, wet steam or hot air. In the case of all of these fluids, it is an aim of the invention to make the rate or pressure of dischargereadily controllable.

A further feature of the invention resides in the particular arrangement provided for holding the aforementioned guns when they are not in use whereby the guns always are readily available, and, when released, will automatically return to their rest positions in readiness for subsequent use.

Still another object is to provide at spotting machine "ice having means for generating from steam its own cold water for the treatment of thermo-setting water soluble spots, thereby eliminating the need for a separate, external water supply line.

A further object is to provide a spotting machine having self contained air heating means, thus eliminating the need for an auxiliary heater and making it possible to use air from an ordinary compressor or like source for spotting purposes; the form and construction of the air heating means is an important feature of the inven-' tion.

Yet another object is to provide a machine of the char-' acter indicated having means facilitating the cleaning of various parts which in the course of normal use collect lint, sediment and other foreign matter.

Other and further objects, together with the features of novelty whereby the objects are achieved, will appear in the course of the following description of the invention.

In the accompanying drawings which form a part of the specification and are to be read in conjunction therewith, and in which like reference numerals are employed to indicate like parts of the various views:

Fig. 1 is a front perspective view of my improved garment spotting machine,

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the machine, 7

Fig. 3 is an enlarged cross sectional view taken along the line 33 of Fig. 2 in the direction of the arrows,

Fig. 4 is an enlarged vertical cross section taken along the plane 44 of Fig. 1 in the direction of the arrows,

Fig. 5 is a horizontal cross section taken along the line 5-5 of Fig. 4,

Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary cross section taken along the line 66 of Fig. 2 in the direction of the arrows,

Fig. 7 is a vertical cross section taken along the line 77 of Fig. 2, V

Fig. 8 is an enlarged sectional elevation taken along the line 88 of Fig. l in the direction of the arrows, and

Fig. 9 is a schematic diagram of the air-water-steam 'and vacuum system employed in my machine.

In general, my machine comprises a base 10 having uprights which carry a chemical tray 11, a small spotting table 12, a larger spotting table 13 and a basket 14. As may be appreciated from Figs. 1 and 2, the larger spotting table (which hereinafter will sometimes be referred to as the main table) is spaced above the basket with its center line normally slightly forward of the center line of the basket, that is to say, slightly nearer the operator; the smaller spotting table (which will sometimes be referred to as the auxiliary table) is positioned above and rearwardly of the main table, while the chemical tray is above and behind the auxiliary table in stair step relationship.

Considering the construction more in detail, the base 10 is T-shaped having a tubular stem 10a extending longitudinally of the machine and joined at one end to the mid portion of a narrow crosswise housing 10b. Holes provided at the extremities of these members make it possible to bolt or otherwise secure the base to the floor.

A hollow pedestal 16 extends vertically from the base and has telescoped into its upper end a post 17 which carries the main spotting table 13. The upper portion of the hollow pedestal is slit longitudinally to form a clamping collar and is provided with outturned cars 18 on either side of the slit; by means of a dog-leg lever 19 screw threadedly connected at one end to the cars, they may be drawn together to clamp the post or may be loosened to release same. Thus the main spotting table may be raised or lowered to the elevation most convenient for the operator and may be locked in adjusted position by lever 19.

The main table has a horizontal heel section 21 preferably formed of an imperforate slab of hard material which is highly resistant to the corrosive action of the chemicals used in the spotting operation. At the end of this is a tapered upwardly pitched nose section comprising a pan 22 with a foraminous cover 23 of stainless steelor the like.

As best seen in Fig. 7, the cover is held in place on the pan by a pair of crossed straps 24 located on its underside; these straps, each bent to form a shallow V, are secured at their ends to the margin of the foraminous cover, and at their intersection, have a welded on nut 25 adapted to receive a threaded stem extending through the bottom of the pan from knob 26. By turning this knob to unscrew the threaded connection, the cover may be easily removed when desired to clean the pan of the lint, etc., carried thereinto in the normal use of the machine. The lowermost end of the pan is provided with a drain outlet 28 communicating with the pipe 29 which runs under the heel section of the table and connects to a flexible hose 30 leading to any suitable point of discharge.

Basket 14 comprises a generally oval panel 32 of canvas, or other suitable fabric, suspended rather loosely in hammock fashion from an open frame loop 33 whose ends are secured to a split collar 34 encircling post 17. The collar is slidable up and down the post to adjust the elevation of the basket relative the main spotting table, and by means of lever 35, one end of which is screw threadedly connected to lugs on the split collar, the latter may be clamped tightly to the post to hold the basket in any selected position.

It is the function of the basket to receive depending portions of a garment being treated, thus to keep same off the floor and out of the way of the operator. As previously noted, the center line of the basket preferably is located rearwardly of the center line of the main spotting table (see Fig. 2) and it will be observed from Fig. 1 that the rear edge of the basket is somewhat higher than the forward edge, it having been found that this arrange ment is best suited to catching garments during the manipulation thereof; at the same time it leaves a wide opening below the main table on the operation side of the machine to permit the operator easily to reach any depending portion of a garment in order to shift same to the top of the table.

1 The chemical tray 11 and the auxiliary spotting table 12 are supported on an upright tubular housing 38 that also functions as a steam separator as will be explained presently. This housing is spaced rearwardly of the pedestal 16 and is connected thereto by a cross brace 39. As best seen in Figs. 4 and 5, a lug 40 extends forwardly from housing 38 and carries a bearing sleeve 41. In the latter sleeve is a freely rotatable post 42 carrying at its upper end a horizontal pipe 43 which in turn supports the auxiliary table 12. A lever arm 45 is attached to post 42 by means of a collar 46 having thumb screws 47, the collar resting upon the upper end of the sleeve and forming an end bearing to support the post. By loosening the thumb screws, post 42 can be adjusted up or down relative the collar in order to adjust the elevation of the auxiliary spotting table.

The forward end of pipe 43 opens into a shallow, sloping pan 49 which is covered by a foraminous oval plate or screen 50; the opposite end of the pipe connects to a flexible hose 51 leading to any suitable point of discharge. Extending along the top of pipe 43 from the perforate nose and secured to the pipe is an imperforate table 52 preferably formed of hard, corrosion resistant material similar to that employed for slab 21.

Post 42 being rotatable in sleeve 41, it will be clear that pipe 43 and the auxiliary spotting table 12 are free to swing in a horizontal plane. A stop shoulder 53 (Fig. on arm 45 limits its rearward travel but the table can be drawn forward from its rearmost position as shown by dotted lines in Fig. 2. When it is thus drawn'forward,

arm 45, of course, swings with the table and by means of link 54 opens valve 55 for a purpose presently to'be described.

Returning now to the steam separator, this, as previously indicated, comprises a vertically elongated tubular housing 38, the housing being closed at the bottom by a plug 56 and having a steam valve 57 screwed into the top. Steam is admitted into the separator from a supply line 58 and below the steam inlet 59 is a water overflow outlet 60 connected by line 61 to a suitable drain. A conventional trap 62 is provided in the latter line to prevent loss of steam therethrough. It will be understood that due to the extended surface of housing 38 that is exposed to ambient air, a portion of the steam admitted to the separator condenses, maintaining the separator filled with distilled water 63 to the level of the overflow outlet; above the surface of the water is steam, of course, the steam in the uppermost portion of the separator being substantially free from entrained moisture and hence referred to as dry.

The steam supply line is connected to the separator via a heat exchanger having a housing 64 through which a steam tube 65 extends, this tube being provided with screw thread external fins 66 that form with the interior of the housing a spiral passageway from the air supply line 67 to the air shut-off valve 68. Air traveling through this passageway when the valve is opened, is heated by fins, which, it will be understood, are heated by the steam within tube 65. The spiral disposition of the fins provide a relatively long heated passageway in a short space and obtain maximum heat transfer to the air.

The outlet from steam valve 68 has a T fitting 69 screwed thereinto and one branch of the T is connected by a pipe 79 to the outlet from the air valve 68. The other branch of the T is connected to a hose 71 extending to a spotting gun 72; as shown, this gun has an open discharge nozzle 72a supported by a ventilated handle.

Both valves are normally closed and it will be seen from the foregoing that both have their outlets connected to the spotting gun via hose 71. Air valve 68 can be opened under control of the foot pedal 73 which, by means of a shaft extending through base member 161/, rotates a crank arm 74; this exerts a thrust on the rod 75 which in turn pivots lever 76 and opens the valve. Pedal 78 through the medium of a hollow shaft 79 turns a similar crank when the pedal is depressed and thus exerts a thrust on rod 80 to control steam valve-57.

The particular construction of the valves employed in my machine form no part of the present invention and hence they have not been detailed in the drawings. It is preferred, however, to employ a steam valve of the type disclosed in the co-pending application of Edwin G. Stevens and William C. Glover, .ir.. Serial No. 222,024, filed April 20, 1951, and issued into Letters Patent 2,651,511 on September 8, l953, to which reference may be had for a fuller understanding of their construction and operation. For purposes of the present description. it will suflice to say that upon initially depressing pedal 78, valve 57 is unscated permitting dry steam to flow from the steam space at the top of the separator through hose 70 and discharge from nozzle 72:: of the spotting gun; as the pedal is depressed more, a throttle member 57a (Fig.4) advances into a restricted throat portion 57b of the valve bore producing above and below the to rise in tube 82 and enter the steam stream through ports 570. Thus, not only can the rate of steam discharge be carried by pedal 78, but also, depending upon the distance the pedal is depressed, the character of the steam can be varied progressively over a range extending from very dry to very wet. It will be noted that the lower end of the water tube 82 is provided with an enlarged cup-shaped inlet member 83, the mouth of which is covered by a screen 84 to prevent entrance of foreign matter.

Valves 55 and 68 may be identical to valve 57 except it-will be runderstoodthat they function simplyas shutofivalves, the tube 82 (which in the case of valve 57 accomplishes the mixing functionreferred to) being omitted in the case of valves 55 and 68. Inother words, when pedal 73 is depressed, air under pressure from the supply line 67 is permitted to fiowthrough the heat exchanger, thence through the valve 68 and hose 70, the heated air being discharged through the nozzle 72a of the spotting gun.

As previously explained, shut-oif valve 55 is opened when the auxiliary spotting table is drawn horizontally toward the operator (see dotted lines, Fig. 2). This valve has its inlet connected to the steam space at the top of the separator and its outlet is connected through hose 86 to a Y fitting 87 mounted on the underside of pipe 43. Within the pipe is a small steam discharge tube 88 directed toward the discharge end of the pipe. The other branch of the Y fitting is connected by a hose 89 to a manually operable blow-out valve 90 set into the bottom of the separator.

Just above the latter valve is a second manually operable valve 92 which is connected by a hose 93 to a water spray gun 94. The spray gun may be of any suitable construction but preferably has a built-in shut-off valve adapted to be operated by squeezing a trigger 94a.

It will be convenient at this point to refer to the schematic diagram, Fig. 9 for a better understanding of the operation of the various parts of my machine. For purposes of description it will be assumed that valve 92 is open and the other valves all are closed which is their normal condition. Steam admitted from supply line 58 is, of course, present in the top of separator 38 and distilled water 63 condensed from the steam fills the bottom portion of the separator. 'As indicated earlier, and as will be obvious from the diagram, openingof the pedalcontrolled steam valve 57 will deliver steam to the spotting gun 72 (this being in wet or dry condition depending upon how far the valve is opened). Likewise, opening of the pedal-operated air valve 68 will deliver to the gun air which has been heated by passage through the heat exchanger 64.

Operation of the trigger on the water spray gun 94 opens the valve indicated by dotted lines whereupon cold distilled waterfrom the bottom of the separator (which Water, it will be understood is subjected to the downward pressure of the steam above its surface) is discharged in a spray from the gun.

Each of these guns may be used in conjunction with either the main spotting table, not shown in the schematic diagram, or the auxiliary spotting table. If in using the latter, the table is drawn laterally toward the operator, this opens valve 55 as previously explained, whereupon steam from the separator is discharged through hose 86 and tube 88; by injector action, the steam discharge from tube 88 draws air in through the foraminous cover 50 and causes it to travel through tube 43 in the direction of the arrows, creating a strong suction at cover 50.

Sediment accumulated in the bottom of the separator may be removed periodically, as needed, by opening blow-out valve 90 and swinging the auxiliary spotting table to open valve 55. The flow of steam through the Y at the end of hose 86 now produces a suction on hose 89 which draws the sediment from the separator through hose 89 and discharges it with the steam through nozzle 88 and out the discharge end of pipe 43.

In using my machine the portion of the garment to be treated is drawn over either the main or auxiliary spotting table, depending upon the size of the garment portion involved and the type of treatment to be employed.

Certain non-water soluble stains such as ink, paint, medicine, perfume, finger nail polish, etc., require chemical treatment, the necessary chemicals and soaps being stored in bottles or other suitable containers in the tray 11; the spotted area is placed over one of the imperforate platforms 21 or 52 where theproper chemical is applied Cir to the fabric which then may be brushed, sponged rubbed, scraped, or otherwise manipulated to loosen the stain. (The brushes, sponges, towels, chamois, etc. necessary for this purpose may conveniently be stored on tray 11 with the chemicals when they are not in use.) For flushing, feathering and drying the treated area it is moved forward over the foraminous screen at the nose of the board being used, and there is treated with one or both of the guns.

If, for example, the stain is one that would be set by heat (i. e. thermo-setting) the spray gun 94 is used to discharge cold water onto the spotted area and flush it thoroughly. Preferably this is carried out over the nose 50 of the auxiliary table which is drawn toward the operator during the process so a powerful suction draws the moisture, stain and solvent from the fabric. Use'of the water spray gun reduces color bleeding from fugitive dyes to a minimum. After flushing, the vacuuming is continued while gun 72 is used to direct hot air through the fabric, which dries it almost instantly.

Moisture controlled steam from gun 72 ordinarily is used to remove water soluble spots only. For the average spot, wet steam is used for flushing the stain followed by dry steam for feathering out the spot and partially drying the fabric. Superior results and faster operation can be obtained in the case of some spots by first feathering around the edges of the spot with dry steam, then moving the nozzle of the gun spirally inward toward the center of the spot while gradually increasing the wetness of the steam and bringing the nozzle closer to the fabric; finally dry steam is used again to remove excess moisture. The latter technique has the advantage that it tends to drive any loosened sizing toward the center of the spot where it is flushed through rather than driving it toward the rim of the spot where it tends to pile up and leave a ring. Also the spot is confined to its own area, and spreading or splattering is eliminated. Use of the vacuum nose 50 likewise is valuable in preventing spreading of stains or moisture. Using my apparatus, steam spotting may be carried out with excellent results even on velvets, plush, suede cloth, duvetyn, corduroy and other'nappy materials which heretofore could not be treated satisfactorily; badly water stained or heavily sized rayons likewise can be spotted very successfully.

As previously indicated, drying of the spotted area can be completed by means of hot'air delivered through gun 72. This may be used either in conjunction with the foraminous nose section 23 of the main spotting table, or

the vacuum nose section 50 of the auxiliary table. Used with the latter, drying is almost instantaneous and will absolutely prevent water rings so that the need for very careful feathering is largely eliminated and the speed of handling correspondingly increased.

An important feature of rny'invention resides in the provision made for holding guns 72 and 94 where they are at all times readily available to the operator and may be put into use for the foregoing purposes with a minimum of manual movement; the guns also are arranged to return to their rest positions almost automatically in readiness for subsequent use so no lost motion on the part of the operator is involved.

In the caseof water spray gun 94, the support comprises a rod 96 extending upwardly from one corner of the chemical tray, the upper end of the rod being bent over and provided with a hook to receive a depending coiled spring 97 which in turn carries the gun. When not in use, the gun thus is held out of the way of all operations carried on or in connection with the spotting tables. When needed, it may be grasped by the operator, drawn down to operating position, thus stretching the spring 97 which automatically restores it to rest position when it is released by the operator after use. The spring keeps hose 93 out of the way during use and permits free manipulation of the water spray gun.

The steam and hot air gun 72 is supported below the level of the main spotting table, (and hence also out of the way) by means of a spring loop 98 whose ends extend laterally and are welded or otherwise secured to the rim 33 of basket 14. Hose 71 is threaded through the loop and is encircled, adjacent the handle of gun 72, with a hemispherical bumper or bushing 99 formed of soft rubber of similar resilient cushioning material. The bumper normally rests on the top of the loop and the weight of the hose below the loop serves to hold the gun upright so it may be grasped easily. When the gun is lifted for use, the hose obviously is drawn upwardly through the eye formed by the spring loop. After use the operator simply drops the gun in a generally vertical direction toward the loop whereupon, due to the hose being threaded through the loop and having the major portion of its weight below the loop, the gun automatically is drawn and guided back to the correct rest: position. The softresilient character of bumper 99 plus the spring construction of the loop serve to cushion the blow of stopping the gun and thus prevent injury to the gun and the support.

From the foregoing it will be seen that my invention is one well adapted to attain all of the ends and objects hereinbefore set forth together with other advantages which are obvious and which areinherent to the apparatus.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of the appended claims.

Inasmuch as various modifications of the invention may be made without departing from the scope thereof, it is to be understood that all matter herein set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

' Having thus described my invention, I claim:

I. In a garment spotting machine, a base, a table, a pedestal supporting the table above the base, said pedestal comprising a pair of telescoping sections one'connected to the base and the other to the table whereby the height of the table can be adjusted, means'for locking said pedestal sections together in any adjusted position, a collar encircling one of the pedestal sections and adjustable axially thereof, means for locking said collar to said last pedestal section in any adjusted position thereon, a generally horizontal shield below the table mounted on and supported by said collar, a hose having a spotting nozzle connected to one end thereof, a source of fluid under pressure connected to the other end of the hose for supplying fluid to said nozzle, and a support for said nozzle secured to said shield to move up and down therewith upon vertical adjustment of said collar.

2. In a garment spotting machine, a base, a table, a

pedestal supporting the table above the base, said pedestal comprising a pair of telescoping sections one connected to the base and the other to the table whereby the height of the table can be adjusted, means for locking said pedestal sections together in any adjusted position, a collar encircling one of said pedestal sections and adjustable axially thereof, means for locking said collar to said last pedestal section in any adjusted position thereon, a generally horizontal shield below the table mounted on and supported by said collar, a spotting nozzle support on said shield adapted to move up and down therewith upon vertical adjustment of said collar, said spotting nozzle support having an eye the axis of whose opening is substantially vertical, a source of fluid pressure having a fixedly positioned outlet, a flexible hose extending downwardly from said outlet then curving back upwardly through said eye and having its free end connected to the end of an elongated spotting nozzle, said hose of sufficient length and weight so that when said nozzle is positioned on said support the weight below said support bal- 8 ances the nozzle above the support in an upright position, said hose being substantially smaller than the opening in the eye whereby it is adapted to travel upwardly through the eye when the nozzle is lifted for use.

3. A garment spotting machine as in claim 2 wherein said support comprises a helical coil of resilient material having its ends secured to the margin of said shield.

4. In a garment spotting machine, a base, a pedestal extending upwardly from said base, said pedestal comprising a pair of telescoping sections one of which is secured to the base, the other section being adjustable vertically relative to said one section, means forreleasably locking said pedestal sections together in any adjusted position, an elongated table supported at one end on the upper extremity of said adjustable pedestal section and projecting laterally from the pedestal, a collar encircling one of said pedestal sections and adjustable axially thereof, means for releasably securing said collar to said last pedestal section in any adjusted position thereon, an elongated open-loop rigid frame supported at one end on the collar and projecting laterally therefrom with the longitudinal axis of the frame approximately paralleling the longitudinal axis of the table, a web of flexible material within said frame and having its edges secured to the frame to form a hammock below the table, a hose having a spotting nozzle connected to one end thereof, a source of fluid under pressure connected to the other end of the hose for supplying fluid to said nozzle, said nozzle constructed and arranged to be-removably carried on said support, and a support for said nozzle secured to'one longitudinal edge of said frame to move up and down with the frame upon vertical adjustment of said collar.

5. In a garment spotting machine, a base, a pedestal extending upwardly from said base, said pedestal comprising a pair of telescoping sections one of which is secured to the base the other section being adjustable vertically relative to said one section, means for releasably locking said pedestal sections together in any adjusted position, an elongated table supported at one end on the upper extremity of said adjustable pedestal section and projecting laterally from the pedestal, a collar encircling one of said pedestal sections and adjustable axially thereof, means for releasably securing said collar to said last pedestal section in any adjusted position thereon, an elongated open-loop rigid frame supported at one end on the collar and projecting laterally therefrom with the longitudinal axis of the frame approximately paralleling the longitudinal axis of the table, a web of flexible material within said frame and having its edges secured to the frame to form a hammock below the table, a spotting nozzle support secured to one longitudinal edge of said frame to move up and down with the frame upon vertical adjustment of said collar, said spotting nozzle support having a spotting-nozzle supporting eye the axis of whose opening is substantially vertical, a source of fluid under pressure having a fixedly positioned outlet, a flexible hose extending downwardly from said outlet then curving back upwardly through said eye and having its free-end connected to the end of'an' elongated spotting'nozzle, said hose of suflicient length and weight so that when said spotting nozzle is positioned on said support the weight of the hose below said support balances the nozzle above the support in an upright position, said hose being substantially smaller than the opening in the eye whereby it is adapted to travel upwardly through the eye when the nozzle is lifted for use.

6. A garment spotting machine as in claim 5 wherein said support comprises a helical coil of resilient material having its ends secured to said frame at longitudinally spaced apart points thereon.

7. In a spotting machine, a work table, a support for said table, an elongated spotting nozzle, a rest for the nozzle disposed below the level of said table, said rest formed to provide an annulus with a central eye the axis of whose opening is substantially vertical, a source of fluid under pressure having an outlet fixedly positioned above the level of said rest, a flexible hose extending References Cited in the file of this patent downwardly from said outlet to a point below the level of the rest then curving back upwardly through said eye UNITED STATES PATENTS and having its free end connected to the end of said noz- 178012 May 1876 zle, said hose of sufiicient length and weight that when 5 702,242 Onell June 1902 said nozzle is positioned on said support the weight of 761,468 Ford May 1904 the hose below the support balances the nozzle above the 809,170 Brfadweu 2) 1906 support in an upright position, said hose being substan- 955% Miller 1910 tially smaller than the opening in the eye whereby it is 957537 Bean May 1910 adapted to travel upwardly through the eye when the 10 1634'471 Cox July 1927 nozzle is lifted for 1,704,472 Grand ean Mar. 5, 1929 8. A machine as in claim 7, including a member on 1'723'439 Petty, 1929 the support for said work table, said rest mounted on 2O24'734 Hoskms 1935 said member and said eye comprising a helical coil of 2,031,026 Barker 1936 resilient material having its ends connected to said 15 2'174387 Morkerf Sept' 1939 member 2,279,984 GOOdWll'l Apr. 14, 1942 9. A machine as in claim 7 including a bushing of 2284572 Hold May 1942 resilient rubber-like material on said nozzle, said hose 23631956 Glover 1944 entering the nozzle through said bushing and said bushing 2132; 3g jgsafted to seat against said eye when the nozzle is at 20 2,483,834 Maindal Oct. 1949 2,528,095 Ward Oct. 31, 1950 2,565,133 Keyes Aug. 21, 1951 2,657,566 Richterkessing Nov. 3, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US178012 *May 12, 1876May 30, 1876 Improvement in flag-staff holders
US702242 *Feb 13, 1902Jun 10, 1902Minnie OnielIroning-board.
US761468 *May 16, 1903May 31, 1904Harriet F FordIroning-table.
US809170 *Jun 1, 1904Jan 2, 1906Walter L BroadwellCollapsible table.
US955526 *Feb 6, 1909Apr 19, 1910Miller And Horning CompanyIroning-table.
US957537 *May 15, 1908May 10, 1910E OneIroning-board.
US1634471 *Mar 21, 1927Jul 5, 1927Cox Irwin WDry-steam sleeve board
US1704472 *Aug 1, 1925Mar 5, 1929Rainbow Light IncYielding holder for luminous tubes
US1723439 *Jun 27, 1927Aug 6, 1929Kay Petty Mfg CoIroning table
US2024734 *Aug 4, 1934Dec 17, 1935Hoskins Raymond HElectric plug and connection holder
US2031026 *Apr 5, 1934Feb 18, 1936Burton Barker CharlesIron attachment
US2174387 *Aug 10, 1936Sep 26, 1939Morken Edward FGarment spotting machine
US2279984 *Jul 5, 1940Apr 14, 1942Goodwin Don OSpotting board
US2284572 *Jun 17, 1940May 26, 1942Charles N JohnsonSpotting table
US2363956 *Feb 24, 1940Nov 28, 1944Cleaners Specialties IncSpotting apparatus
US2399576 *Dec 28, 1943Apr 30, 1946Shoop Glen CSpotting board attachment
US2479925 *Jun 12, 1947Aug 23, 1949Bill Glover IncGarment spotting machine
US2483834 *Jun 27, 1947Oct 4, 1949Henrik MaindalHolder of the wire for electric laundry irons
US2528095 *Jun 25, 1948Oct 31, 1950Alfred WardCombination syringe handle
US2565133 *Oct 26, 1948Aug 21, 1951Keyes Harry ASpotting board
US2657566 *Mar 6, 1950Nov 3, 1953W M Cissell Mfg CompanyVacuum spotting board
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2807503 *Feb 13, 1953Sep 24, 1957Buterbaugh Albert MGarment spotting apparatus
US2923959 *Aug 14, 1956Feb 9, 1960 Compressed-air operated cleaning apparatus
US2967670 *Oct 3, 1958Jan 10, 1961Roscoe McrobertsPre-spotting machine
US3512379 *Mar 5, 1968May 19, 1970Mc Graw Edison CoSpotting board
US4455706 *Oct 5, 1979Jun 26, 1984Ing. Jurgen Volkmann, GmbhProcess and apparatus for the removal or controlled reduction of adherent films of liquid on hard surfaces
US4926514 *Jan 18, 1989May 22, 1990Biac Holding AgMethod of and apparatus for removing stains from soiled areas of a plannar textile article
US5203044 *Sep 6, 1991Apr 20, 1993Cherokee Products, Inc.Spot cleaning system and method
US5253378 *Apr 30, 1992Oct 19, 1993Cherokee Products, Inc.Spot cleaning system and method
US5539952 *Aug 22, 1994Jul 30, 1996Hayes; ThomasFluid handling apparatus for maintaining lithographic presses
US7562543Jul 21, 2009Whirlpool CorporationVertical laundry module with backsplash
US7587917Dec 30, 2005Sep 15, 2009Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with shelf module
US7617702Dec 30, 2005Nov 17, 2009Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with cabinet module
US7624600Dec 30, 2005Dec 1, 2009Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with horizontally arranged cabinet module
US7628043Dec 8, 2009Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with horizontal modules
US7849717Jun 26, 2009Dec 14, 2010Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with horizontal module spanning two laundry appliances
US8286452Jul 8, 2009Oct 16, 2012Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with segmented work surface
US8322169Jul 1, 2009Dec 4, 2012Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with vertical laundry module
US8375750Jul 1, 2009Feb 19, 2013Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with vertical laundry module
US8381552Jul 2, 2009Feb 26, 2013Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with vertical laundry module
US8413470Apr 9, 2013Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with vertical laundry module
US8459067Jul 2, 2009Jun 11, 2013Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with vertical laundry module
US8479542Jul 1, 2009Jul 9, 2013Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with work surface having a functional insert
US9187855Jul 2, 2009Nov 17, 2015Whirlpool CorporationModular laundry system with work surface
US20030150941 *Feb 12, 2002Aug 14, 2003Cummins Gregory C.Dry cleaning process employing a unitary chemical dispensing cabinet
US20060130535 *Dec 30, 2005Jun 22, 2006Sunshine Richard AModular laundry system with horizontal modules
US20060156765 *Dec 30, 2005Jul 20, 2006Sunshine Richard AModular laundry system with horizontally arranged cabinet module
US20070256457 *Dec 30, 2005Nov 8, 2007Kendall James WModular laundry system with horizontal and vertical modules
US20070266743 *Dec 30, 2005Nov 22, 2007Sunshine Richard AModular laundry system with horizontally arranged cabinet module
US20070283723 *Dec 30, 2005Dec 13, 2007Sunshine Richard AModular laundry system with horizontal modules
DE1283188B *Feb 26, 1966Nov 21, 1968Friedrich Waldt KgBuegelbock zum Buegeln der Hosenbeinlaengsnaehte
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/5.00B, 248/75, 68/222, 68/240, 38/111, 15/409
International ClassificationD06F43/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F43/002
European ClassificationD06F43/00B