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Publication numberUS2708214 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 10, 1955
Filing dateMay 24, 1954
Priority dateMay 24, 1954
Publication numberUS 2708214 A, US 2708214A, US-A-2708214, US2708214 A, US2708214A
InventorsHerbert R Galloway
Original AssigneeMinnesota Plastics Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Battery cap
US 2708214 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1955 H. R. GALLOWAY 2,708,214

BATTERY CAP Filed May 24, 1954 I NV EN TOR fier'berf Gal/away ATTORNEY United States Patent 6 iiATTERY CAP Herbert R. Galloway, St. Paul, Minn, assignor to Minnesota Plastics Corporation, Ramsey viounty, MIDIL, a corporation of ilflinnesota Application May 24, 1954, Serial No. 431,964

11 Claims. (Cl. 136-177) This invention relates to an improvement in battery caps and in the method of assembling the same and deals particularly with the type of cap used on wet cell batteries.

Wet cell batteries are normally provided with filling caps which must be provided with vents extending therethrough. Some diificulty has been experienced in caps of this type if the vents extend directly through the caps, as the movement of the battery has a tendency to splash liquid through the vent openings. in order to avoid this ditficulty, caps have recently been made of plastic which are hollow in nature and include spaced bottom and top walls. These walls are provided with vent openings which are offset in position so that the battery fluid cannot splash directly from the caps. This construction requires the molding of the caps in two parts and in assembling the parts. The present invention deals with a cap construction which can be easily assembled and which has other structural advantages.

An object of the present invention resides in the provision of a hollow battery cap which is formed including a body portion and a top portion. The body portion is formed with encircling side walls and a closed bottom. The top portion comprises a top closure provided with a shank projecting downwardly therefrom. This shank terminates in a pair of spaced arms having hooked shaped ends, these ends being designed to extend through an aperture in the bottom closure of the cap. As a result, in assembling the cap, it is only necessary to insert this shank of the top portion through the opening in the body portion of the cap, and forcing the top part downwardly until the hooked ends are extended through the aperture whereupon the natural resilience of the material causes the hooked ends to engage the nndersurface of the bottom closure to hold the two parts assembled.

A feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a battery cap having a top closure portion which is formed of material possessing some resilience. The cap includes a shank which terminates in spaced arms which may be resiliently urged toward one another. Thus, in inserting the shank onto the aperture, the arms are flexed toward one another until they pass through the aperture, whereupon they may spread apart to hold the two parts assembled.

An added feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a battery cap having a body portion provided with angularly spaced abutments against which the top closure may engage. If preferred, these angularly spaced abutments may comprise a substantially continuous shoulder. These abutments, or shoulders, engage against the undersurface of the top closure as this portion of the cap is assembled, thereby limiting the inward or downward movement of the top closure. When the top closure is against the abutment, the hook ends of the resilient arms are in engagement with the undersurface of the bottom closure, thus holding the two parts assembled.

A feature of the present invention resides in the pro- "ice vision of diametrically opposed passages through the top closure on opposite sides of the body and in providing the resilient arms inwardly of these passages. As a result, any liquid which is splashed into the cap from the movement of the battery cannot pass directly through the openings in the top of the capas this liquid is deflected by the arms.

These advantages, together with other objects, and novel features, of the present invention will be more clearly and fully set forth in the following specification and claims.

In the drawings forming a part of the specification:

Figure l is a side elevational view of a battery cap showing the structure in assembled form.

Figure 2 is a top plan view of the cap shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a sectional view through the assembled cap showing the relationship of the parts therein.

Figure 4 is a side elevational view of the top portion of the cap showing the arrangement of parts therein.

Figure 5 is a top plan view of the top portion of the cap.

Figure 6 is a sectional view through the body of the cap.

Figure 7 is a top plan view through the cap, also with the top portion thereof removed.

The cap is indicated in general by the letter A. This cap is formed of two main parts, one of which is best illustrated in Figures 6 and 7 of the drawings, and which is identified in general by the numeral 11. The other of the parts is illustrated best in Figures 4 and 5 of the drawings and is indicated in general by the numeral 11.

The body portion 19 includes a generally vertical cylindrical sleeve 12 which is connected at its lower extremity to a ring-shaped flange 13. This flange 13 preferably extends both inwardly and outwardly from the sleeve 12 and is designed to act as a stop shoulder for the cap as it is threaded into the battery. The sleeve 12 is provided with a series of angularly spaced vertical ribs 14 thereupon which project outwardly from the sleeve 12 so that the sleeve may be easily grasped and turned.

As is also indicated in Figures 2 and 6 of the drawings the sleeve 12 is provided wtih a series of angularly spaced ribs 15 which extend vertically and which terminate short of the upper extremity of the sleeve 12. These ribs 15 act as abutments against which the top portion of the cap may engage as will be later described in detail.

A sleeve 16 projects downwardly from the flange 13 along the inner edge thereof. This sleeve 16 is externally threaded as indicated at 17 so that it may be threaded into the top of the battery. At the lower end of the sleeve 16, a disc-like bottom closure 19 is provided. This bottom closure 19 is provided with a central aperture 20 which in the particular form of construction illustrated is rectangular in shape.

With reference now to Figures 4 and 5 of the drawings, it will be noted that the top portion 11 is provided with a disc-like closure 21 which is generally circular in shape. Two notches are formed on diametrically opposite sides of the disc 21 by lines 22 which are shown extending along chords of the periphery of the disc 21. The length of these chords 22 is substantially equal to the distance between the internal ribs 15 as best illustrated in Figure 2 of the drawings so that the disc 21 is firmly supported by the ribs 15.

As best indicated in Figures 3 and 4 of the drawings, a shank 23 is provided integral with the disc 21 and projecting downwardly therefrom, preferably at the center thereof. This shank 23 is shown constructed of a pair of generally parallel arms 24 and 25 which are connected by a central connecting web 28. As is indicated in the forming an effective vent.

drawings, the web 28 does not extend the full length of the arms 2 and 25 but terminates at a point spaced from the lower ends thereof. As a result, the arms 24 and 25 may flex within the lastic limits of the material of which the arms are formed. At their lower ends, the arms 24 and 25 are provided with outwardly projecting flanges 26 add 27 which are rounded or beveled along their undersgrface so that they may be forced through the opening 2 in the body portion of the cap. The upper surfaces of the flanges 2'7 are preferably on a common plane so that once the arms have been inserted through the opening 20, they cannot be readily retracted.

The assembly of the cap A is believed obvious from the foregoing description. The body portion 16 and the top portion 13. are assembled by merely inserting the shank 23 of the top portion into the sleeve 12 of the bottom or body portion, the lower ends 26 and 27 of the arms 24 and 25 engaging the bottom closure 19 on opposite sides of the opening 2% and the rounded or tapered shape of these arms acting to flex the arms inwardly. Downward pressure upon the shank causes the flanges as and 27 to pass entirely through the opening 29. The shank is so proportioned that when the marginal edges of the disc 21 engage the upper ends of the ribs 15, the flanges 26 and 27 will have passed through the opening 28 and will engage the undersurface of the bottom closure 1?. Obviously, as soon as the flanges 26 and 27 have passed through the opening 2% the arms spread apart and cause the upper surfaces of these flanges to engage the bottom closure 19.

it will be noted from the drawings that the notches formed by the lines 22 are outwardly of the arms 24 and 25. Accordingly, any liquid which is splashed upwardly from the battery cannot be splashed through the notches as they are protected by the arms. In other words, any liquid splashed into the interior of the cap must enter the cap at substantially right angles to the notches thus it .will be also noted that as the arms 24 and 25 are spaced apart on each side thereof, there are in reality two openings, or passages, from the interior of the'battery into the interior of the cap and both of these passages cannot well be bridged over by liquid. Actually, the fact that the sharlt extends through the opening, has a tendency to drain the liquid within the cap downwardly along the shank to drip back into the battery from the lower end of the shank,

it will be noted that an effective seal is provided without the use of cement or without the requirement of heat sealing. Accordingly, the cost of assembling the two parts of the hollow cap may be substantially reduced without affecting the quality of the cap.

in accordance with the patent statutes, the principles of construction and operation of the battery cap have been described and while it has been endeavored to set forth the best embodiments thereof, it is desired to have it understood that obvious changes may be made within the scope of the following claims without departing from the spirit of the present invention.

l claim:

1. A battery cap including a hollow body formed of two separate members, one of which is threaded to fit into a battery opening, one of said members having a bottom closure, and the other said member including a top closure, means limiting movement of said bottom closure to said top closure, and resilient means on the member including the top closure, the bottom closure having an op ning through which said resilient means is engageable to hold said members from separation.

2. A battery cap including a hollow body having peripheral walls, a top closure and a bottom closure, said body being formed of two members, said top closure 'being integral with one of said members and the bottom closure forming a part of the other of said members, said body having external threads designed to extend into a battery opening, one of said closures having resilient means thereon and the other of said closures having an aperture therein through which said resilient means extends to hold said closures in properly spacedrelation.

3. A battery cap including a cap body having peripheral walls, a top closure, and a bottom closure, external threads on said walls designed to extend into a battery, said body being formed of two separable members, one of said members having a shank including a pair of spaced resilient arms thereupon and the other of said closure having an aperture therethrough, through which said resilient arms may engage, said one closure having an aperture therethrough, offset from the first named aperture.

4. A battery cap including a body having an encircling wall, a top closure, and a bottom closure, external three. on said walls engageable into a battery, the botn: closure having an aperture therethrough, and a shank on the top closure, said shank having a pair of spaced resilient arms thereupon, said resilient arm having hooked ends thereupon, said hooked ends engaging through said aperture and holding said closure from separation.

5.. The construction described in claim 4 and in which the upper closure has a passage therethrough offset from the aperture in said bottom closure.

6. A battery cap including a body portion having a sleeve, threaded sleeve secured to first mentioned sleeve, and engageable into a battery, and a bottom closure upon said second sleeve, a top closure, and a shank on said top closure extending through said bottom closure, said bottom closure having an aperture therethrough, through which said shank extends, and resilient means on said shank for holding said shank engaged with said bottom closure.

7. The COl'lSil ction described in claim 1 and includrneans for limiting movement of said closures toward one another.

8. A battery cap including a body portion having external threads designed to extend into a battery, a bottom closure on said body portion having an aperture therethrough, a disc-like top closure, a shank on said top closure extending downwardly therefrom, and resillent means on said shank extending through said aperture and securing said top closure from separation from said bottom closure.

'9. The construction described in claim 8 and includ ing passage means in top closure offset from said aperture.

10. The construction described in claim 8 and in which said resilient means comprises a pair of resilient arms, having hooked ends.

11. A battery cap including a body portion having external threads designed to extend into a battery, a bottom closure on said body portion having an aperture therein, a top closure disc, means for limiting movement of said top closure disc toward said bottom closure, a shank secured to said top closure and extending toward said bottom closure and a pair of spaced resilient arms on said shank extending through said aperture and said bottom closure.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES lATENTS 1,363,645 Gould Dec. 28, 1920 1,736,115 Ford Nov. 19, 1929 1,997,911. Wallace et al May 9, 1933 1,996,843 Van Meter, d. Apr. 9, l935

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1363645 *Feb 17, 1920Dec 28, 1920Gould Storage Battery CoStorage battery
US1736115 *Jun 30, 1925Nov 19, 1929Ford BruceStorage-battery cover
US1907911 *Jun 4, 1928May 9, 1933George E PetroskyVenting means for storage battery cells
US1996843 *Oct 7, 1933Apr 9, 1935Jr Solomon L Van MeterBattery filling device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3108911 *Jun 2, 1961Oct 29, 1963Gould National Batteries IncBattery vent plugs
US3253963 *Jan 31, 1963May 31, 1966Globe Union IncVent cap
US4268371 *Mar 13, 1980May 19, 1981The Duriron Company, Inc.Cable guide for a tubular anode
US4517262 *Dec 21, 1983May 14, 1985General Battery CorporationVent for a storage battery
Classifications
U.S. Classification429/89
International ClassificationH01M2/12
Cooperative ClassificationY02E60/12, H01M2/1205
European ClassificationH01M2/12B