Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2708930 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 24, 1955
Filing dateJun 23, 1952
Priority dateJun 23, 1952
Publication numberUS 2708930 A, US 2708930A, US-A-2708930, US2708930 A, US2708930A
InventorsLowman William G
Original AssigneeLowman William G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arch maintaining device
US 2708930 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

w. G. LOWMAN ARCH MAINTAINING DEVICE Filed June 25, 1952 May 24, 1955 INVENTOR.

0 524 W QM United States Patent ARCH MAINTAINING DEVICE William G. Lowman, Chambersburg, Pa.

Application June 23, 1952, Serial No. 294,978

4 Claims. (Cl. 128-80) This invention pertains to an arch maintaining device for the arch structure of a human foot and is of the elastic bandage type. 7

Since a very large proportion of people suffer from foot discomfort, much of which is attributable to some defect in the skeletal arch structure of the foot, much thought has been given to the problems involved and a large variety of corrective devices have been proposed and patented. These devices fall into two general classes. First, there are those of a rigid or semi-firm type used between the underside of a foot and the shoe therefor to occupy the space provided by a normally arched foot. The second classcomprises more or less rigid devices and bandages or slings intended to operate in a more limitedway on the arch structure to correct minor weakness and prevent strain. The new and useful device provided by this invention falls in the second class and is of elastic band construction.

It is the general object of this invention to provide an elastic device that will exert a mild corrective action on the arch structure of the foot by operating principally on a particular part of the heel bone or calcaneus.

Generally speaking, the arch structure comprises an inner longitudinal arch, a lesser outer longitudinal arch, and a forward transverse or metatarsal arch forming a unitary support. The integrityof this structure depends on maintenanceof the heel bone in proper position. When the forward elevated end. of this bone, which is adjacent the inner side of the foot, rotates downwardly and inwardly, the arch structure partially collapses and strain and discomfort result from pronation.

A specific object of this invention, therefore, is to provide an elastic band that will act constantly on the heel bone in the manner indicated.

More specifically, it is the object of this invention to provide an arch maintaining device comprising an elastic band portion adapted to encircle the heel of a wearer beneath the ankle bone and to act against the heel bone, and another elastic band adapted to encircle the instep portion of the foot and hold the heel band in operative relation at all times.

These and other features of the invention contributing to satisfaction in use will be more fully understood from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of the device in operative position on the right foot of a wearer, the view being taken from the inner side of the foot,

Fig. 2 is a similar side view taken from the outer side of the foot; and

Fig. 3 is a plan view to an enlarged scale showing the flat pattern configuration of the device in partially assembled condition.

An assembled arch maintaining device 10 for a right foot is illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. The device 10 consists of an elastic arch or instep band 12 having its ends stitched together with an even stitch and without overlapping, the connecting stitching, which is not shown,

2,708,930 Patented May 24, 1955 being covered on the outside with a reinforcing strip 14 of canvas or chamois, and a narrower heel band 16 of elastic material. The ends 18 and 20 of the heel band are secured at predetermined spaced points to the rearward edge of the instep band 12.

Preferably, the relatively wide band 12 and the relatively narrow band 16 are woven in flat pieces of elastic and inelastic thread arranged to afford one-way stretch only in the lengthwise direction of the instep band 12 and the heel band 16 respectively. An elastic thread of medium tensile strength (two-inch compression) will be used. All free edges of the arch and heel bands will be finished. Flat stitching with no overlapping of edges is used where the heel band 16 is joined to the instep band 12.

The size, arrangement of parts, and other details of construction will be given for a small size device 10 for use on the right foot. The instep band for other sizes will be similarly proportioned in length. In the device illustrated, the instep band 12 has a circumferential length of seven inches with parallel end edges. The plantar or foot sole contacting portion has a minimum width of three inches, the length or each edge under the reinforcing strip 14 is two and one-half inches, and the reduction or cut back in width from the maximum dimension is one-eighth inch for the anterior edge and three-eighths inch for the posterior edge.

The heel band 16 has a uniform width of one inch and a length of six and one-quarter inches, and is slightly flared at the connecting ends as shown. The length is measured from the dorsal edge of the band. Figs. 1 and 2 illustrate the specifically preferred manner of relating the flared or curved end portions 18 and 20 of the heel band 16 to the rearward or posterior edge of the instep band 12. It will be noted that the curves on the end portions of the heel band 16 start approximately one-quarter inch from the point at which the heel band is joined to the instep band. The medial or inner end 18 of the heel band 16 joins the arch or instep band 12 in the center of the medial side in a manner such as to form an angle of 115 degrees with the rearward edge of the arch band. This angular relation is shown by broken lines as angle a in Fig. 1. 0n the lateral or outer side, the corresponding end 20 of the heel band 16 joins the arch band 12 one-eighth inch below the center of the lateral side and forms a dorsal angle of degrees. This latter angle is shown by broken lines as angle b in Fig. 2. These angles are obliterated by curving the bands 12 and 16 together at their joined edges in order to remove pressure points and prevent pinching of the wearers foot.

The functional relations of the arch maintaining device 10 to the foot of a wearer are clearly shown in the opposite side views of Figs. 1 and 2. The bone anatomy corresponding to the foot portions engaged by the arch or instep band 12 and the heel band 16 have been previously explained and identified generally as to position with reference to the metatarsus and calcaneus. The instep band 12 is of a size to extend approximately from the cuneiforms to adjacent but rearwardly of the heads of the metatarsals, it is widest in the portion adapted to engage the plantar portion of the foot and narrows toward the portion adapted to engage the dorsum.

Should the arch device of this invention be made of leather, heavy cotton fabric, canvas or the like, it would have some utility but the support afforded would be a minimum. The supporting function is, however, a maximum with elastic material because the one-way elastic bands 12 and 16 provide a tension factor which will vary according to whether the foot is weight-bearing or not.

In contradistinction to prior arch supports of this general nature, the heel band 16 is the active component because it supports the foot skeleton by continually grasping the calcaneus and preventing substantial rotation thereof. Although the arch band 12 circles the bone structure of the mid arch and inherently gives some support to the soft tissues of the foot, its basic function is to act as an anchor and hold the heel band 16 against the calcaneus.

It has been found that the arch-maintaining device, or arch bandage, of the invention is particularly beneficial in the numerous cases where strained symptoms are present in the muscles and tissues of the feet and legs. Relief from these symptoms can be obtained by its use. In such cases of minor foot and muscle weakness, use of the arch rest by one engaging in increased physical activity, such as golf, tennis, and occupations requiring constant standing on the feet, will provide foot comfort and prevent foot strain and weak feet.

For use by women, the arch rest device can be made of a harmonizing color so as to be unnoticeablc when worn with open strap shoes.

While a preferred emobdiment has been described in detail, it will be understood that variations can be made in details of construction and arrangement of parts without departing from the principles of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as novel and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. An arch maintaining device consisting of a relatively broad instep band of woven elastic material, said band being of a shape and extent yieldingly to engage only the portion of a wearers foot extending from the cuneiforms to rearwardly of the heads of the metatarsals, said instep band being widest at the portion adapted to engage the plantar portion of the wearers foot and narrowing toward the portion adapted to engage the dorsum thereof, and a relatively narrow heel band having a width of the order of one inch and being of woven elastic material, the ends of said heel band being joined to the rearward edge of the instep band at spaced points arranged to dispose the heel band entirely below the ankle bone and in a position to encircle the rearward portion of the wearers heel and yieldingly grasp the opposite sides of the calcaneus to resist inward and downward rotation thereof.

2. An arch maintaining device consisting of a relatively broad instep band woven of elastic and inelastic threads with the elastic threads arranged circumferentially of the instep band, said band being of a shape and extent yieldingly to engage the portion of a wearers foot extending from the cuneiforms to rearwardly of the heads of the metatarsals, said instep band being widest at the portion adapted to engage the plantar portion of the wearers foot and narrowing toward the portion adapted to engage the dorsum thereof, and a relatively narrow heel band having a Width of the order of one inch and being woven of elastic and inelastic threads with the elastic threads arranged lengthwise thereof, the ends of said heel band being joined to the rearward edge of the instep band at spaced points arranged to dispose the heel band entirely below the ankle bone and in a position to encircle the rearward portion of the wearers heel and yieldingly grasp the opposite sides of the calcaneus to resist inward and downward rotation thereof.

3. The combination of claim 2 in which the end portion of the heel band adapted to engage the inner side of the foot joins the rearward edge of the instep band at an angle of approximately 115 degrees, and the end portion adapted to engage the outer side of the foot joins the rearward edge of the instep band at an angle of approximately 125 degrees, whereby the heel band and instep band will lie fiat against the foot at their junctions.

4. An arch maintaining device consisting of a relatively broad instep band of elastic material, said instep band being of a shape and extent yieldingly to engage only the portion of a wearers foot extending approximately from adjacent the cuneiforms to adjacent but rearwardly of the heads of the metatarsals, said instep band being widest at the portion adapted to engage the plantar portion of the wearers foot and narrowing toward the portion adapted to engage the dorsum thereof, and a relatively narrow heel band of elastic material having a. width of the order of one inch, the ends of said heel band being joined to the rearward edge of the instep band at spaced points arranged to dispose the heel band entirely below the ankle bone and in a position to encircle the rearward portion of the wearers heel and yieldingly grasp the opposite sides of the calcaneus to resist inward and downward rotation thereof.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,462,534 Condylis et al July 24, 1923 2,013,757 Jung, Jr Sept. 10, 1935 2,292,643 Layana Aug. 11, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1462534 *Jun 14, 1921Jul 24, 1923Clarke Jessie CArch supporter
US2013757 *May 30, 1930Sep 10, 1935Jung Arch Brace CompanyAnklet
US2292643 *May 17, 1940Aug 11, 1942Epifania LayanaOrthopedic device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3777751 *Nov 29, 1971Dec 11, 1973E WiseAnkle supports
US3926186 *May 28, 1974Dec 16, 1975Nirschl Robert PMuscular support
US4271605 *Jul 16, 1979Jun 9, 1981Sea GullFlexible foot support
US4392487 *Aug 25, 1980Jul 12, 1983Selner Allen JMethod and apparatus for foot stabilization
US4637381 *Jun 3, 1985Jan 20, 1987Institute For Gravitational Strain Pathology, Inc.Foot supporting device
US4753228 *Jul 14, 1986Jun 28, 1988Selner Allen JApparatus for foot stabilization
US5354260 *May 13, 1993Oct 11, 1994Novamedix, Ltd.Medical appliance
US5460601 *Mar 5, 1993Oct 24, 1995Shannahan; Donald R.For treating plantar fascitis
US5473781 *Nov 4, 1994Dec 12, 1995Greenberg; BertSock having a foot arch support
US5554107 *Jun 6, 1995Sep 10, 1996Shannahan; Donald R.For treating plantar fascitis
US5692319 *Jun 7, 1995Dec 2, 1997Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with 360 wrap fit closure system
US5865779 *Apr 9, 1997Feb 2, 1999Gleason; John A.Orthotic device for treatment of plantar fasciitis
US5989204 *Mar 19, 1997Nov 23, 1999Kinetic Concepts, Inc.Foot-mounted venous compression device
US6454733Feb 27, 2001Sep 24, 2002John H. KrusenklausFoot strap
US6893409 *Nov 2, 1999May 17, 2005Kci Licensing, Inc.Foot mounted venous compression device
US7740603 *Feb 9, 2006Jun 22, 2010Kamel ShoukryRemovable flexible orthosis for middle foot damage
US7972290Feb 12, 2008Jul 5, 2011Donna ChisholmDynamic foot-arch support system and associated methods
US20120035522 *Aug 9, 2010Feb 9, 2012Brown Adam CArch strap and method for treating heel pain
US20130066249 *Sep 12, 2011Mar 14, 2013Joshua Paul EldridgeFoot Arch Support for Barefoot Athletes
EP2081522A1 *Nov 13, 2007Jul 29, 2009Neil MotyerDevice for carrying the load of injured soft tissue
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/27, 602/66
International ClassificationA61F13/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/065
European ClassificationA61F13/06D2