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Publication numberUS2709426 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 31, 1955
Filing dateNov 2, 1951
Priority dateNov 2, 1951
Publication numberUS 2709426 A, US 2709426A, US-A-2709426, US2709426 A, US2709426A
InventorsSidney Nove
Original AssigneeSidney Nove
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy gun
US 2709426 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

S. NOVE May 31, 1955 TOY GUN 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 2 1951 INVENTOR. Sidney Wei/e WWW May 31, 1955 5 yE 2,709,426

TOY GUN Filed Nov. 2, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR. 3i clneq no 1 TOY GUN Sidney Nove, Winchendon, Mass.

Application November 2, 1951, Serial No. 254,509

3 Claims. (Cl. 124-21) The present invention relates to a toy gun, more particularly to a toy gun with a rotatable magazine for propelling a plurality of projectiles in succession after a single loading.

It is the object of this invention to provide an inexpensive mechanism for a toy gun which may, if desired propel a plurality of projectiles in rapid succession with but a single loading.

It is also the object of this invention to provide means for positioning, one at a time, for rapid successive firing, a plurality of projectiles which have been loaded into the gun magazine.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a mechanism, realistic in appearance, which may be adapted for use in a variety of toy guns, such as pistols, rifles and cannons. It is further the object of this invention to provide an inexpensive toy gun of simple construction having elements of the mechanism similar in appearance to the elements of a real gun giving the toy an air of realism.

This invention is provided with a cylindrical magazine which, tensioned by a spring, is turnable on its axis and successively positions, after each firing, a projectile in alignment with the bore of the barrel and projectile, impelling mechanism.

A further feature of the invention comprises a projectile impelling mechanism having a pivoted arm and hammer manually operated directly or adapted to be operated by an ordinary trigger mechanism and which is actuated by a spring or elastic means.

Another feature of this invention provides a plurality of guide pins in the magazine cavity for aligning the projectile to be fired with the bore of the gun barrel and the projectile impelling mechanism and also serves to reduce the friction against the projectile as it leaves the magazine.

These and other features and effect of the invention will be more apparent when considered in conjunction with the following description of the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of an embodiment of the invention showing the mechanism mounted on a base.

Figure 2 is a front elevation of the embodiment as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a sectional side elevation taken along the line 3-3 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a side elevation showing a modification of the invention.

Figure 5 is a sectional elevation taken along the line 55 of Figure 1.

Referring now to the drawings, the gun mechanism is mounted in a frame 1 having a gun barrel 2, the bore 2 of which extends backwards to the upper forward portion of a cavity 3 in which the cylindrical magazine 4 carrying the projectiles is mounted for rotation. In Figure 1 the frame is mounted on a base or platform 6 simulating a cannon. However the frame may be varied in shape without changing the essential mechanism, so that instead States Patent 2,709,426 Patented May 31, 1955 ice of appearing as a cannon it may resemble a pistol or other firearm.

The cylindrical magazine 4 is free to rotate on a pin 9, coaxial with the magazine, which pin is loosely fitted in aligned holes 10 and 11 in bosses 8 and 7, respectively projecting inwardly from the frame. The pin 9 extends through the boss 7 to the forward part of the frame 1.

A spring 12 coiledabout the pin 9 has one end firmly attached to the forward part of the frame 1 by any suitable means, such as a tack l3 and the other end attached to the forward face of the cylindrical magazine 4 at point 14 in a similar manner. This spring 12 is tensioned to turn the cylindrical magazine in the direction as indicated by the arrow A in Figure 5. A pin 18 permanently set in the magazine comes in contact with the two pins 16 and 17 which extend downward from the top of the frame 1 on either side of the magazine into the projections or bosses 7 and 8 respectively. This prevents the magazine from being turned more than one complete revolution in either direction and also maintains continual tension in the direction indicated by arrow A.

The cylindrical magazine 4 is provided with a plurality of holes 15 extending the length of the magazine parallel to its axis of rotation and radially positioned at such a distance from the center as to become successively aligned with the bore 2 as the magazine is revolved. The diameter of the holes 15 is such as to receive the projectile 5 with a free but not loose sliding fit and the projectiles are of such a diameter as to pass freely and accurately through the bore 2'.

The two pins 16 and 17 in addition to the function mentioned in relation to the permanent pin 18, will also come into contact with the sides of a projectile 5 as the latter is pushed against these pins by the spring tension on the magazine and the pins 16 and 17 thereupon hold it in alignment with the bore 2'. It should be noted that in firing the projectile, the two pins serving as guides but having but a small area in contact with the projectile, offer little frictional resistance as the projectile leaves the magazine.

The projectiles are impelled from the gun by a firing mechanism which is shown as comprising a pivoted firing arm 20 positioned behind the magazine cavity 3 in a channel 21 in the back of the frame, which channel is aligned with the bore 2 and the holes 15 through the magazine as they come into position for firing. The firing arm 20 is pivoted at its lower end on the pin 22 which extends across the opposite side walls of the channel 21.

The channel in the frame is made deep enough to have an opening on its inward end 23 into the magazine cavity both above and below the projecting boss 8. The forward edge of the firing arm in its normal position will rest against the upper edge of the inward end 23 and a hammer element 20 on the forward face of the firing arm in this position projects through the opening above the boss 8 in a position aligned with a hole 15 when in firing position or the fixed pin 18 when the magazine is empty. The firing arm is spring pressed towards the inward end of the channel 23 by any suitable means such as an elastic band as shown in Figure 1 or by an expansion spring as shown in Figure 4.

In Figure 4 an expansion spring 24 has one end attached to the pin 25 which is secured to the wall of the channel 23 and has its other end butting against the firing arm 20 at the front 26. Another modification is illustrated in Figure 3 whereby an elastic band 27 threaded through an eyelet 29 attached to the top of the frame, has one end looped about the gun barrel 2 and the other end looped around the top of the firing arm 20 in a groove 28.

If as is illustrated in the drawings, the embodiment is provided with the decorative elements 30 resembling the outer portions of the gun magazine, one of them should be moveable in order to permit the projectiles to be easily placed in the holes 15 for loading. in Figure 2 one of the elements 39 is a segmental flange mounted on a rod 31, so as to be slidable up and down. Thus by moving the element 30 downward and by appropriately manually turning the magazine, all of the holes 15 may be readily exposed for loading.

Any other suitable means may be used for moving these elements out of the way when loading, as for example pivoting the top of these elements 34) to the frame.

In the operation of this gun, after the magazine is fully loaded or even partly loaded, the projectile nearest the firing arm 29 will have its side in contact with the left side 32 of the firing arm 20. When the arm element 20 is pulled back, either manually or by a trigger arrangement, the spring tension on the magazine will move the projectile against the pins 16 and 17 into alignment with the bore 2' and the hammer surface 20.

When the firing arm 26 is released the elastic attached to the arm (or the spring if one is used instead) will pull the arm forward so that the hammer section 26 on the arm will hit the end of the projectile, driving it forward through the gun bore 2. As soon as the projectile has left the magazine, the spring tension on it will move the magazine in the direction indicated by the arrow A in Figure 5, until the side of the next projectile comes into contact with the left side 32 of the firing arm 20. The firing arm 20 may again be drawn back permitting this next projectile to move into alignment with the gun bore 2' and the hammer, and then released, driving this next projectile through the bore 2'.

This process may be repeated until all the projectiles have been fired and the pin 18 has moved around in the direction as indicated by the arrow A in Figure 5, and is in contact with the pins 16 and 17.

In the mechanism and operation which has been described above, it will be noted that the projectiles 5 as they line up to be fired in the magazine have only the small area of the rounded pins 16 and i7 acting as friction on the sides of the projectile. In this way the projectile is substantially free and when therefore impelled by the firing arm passes into the bore 2' with substantially a maximum velocity possible. It will also be noted that the pin 18 is shorter than the projectiles and does not extend to the face of the firing arm at the opening near the ends of the channel 21.

It may also be noted that between the revolving magazine 4 and the projecting boss or hub 3 there is a Washer 35 which may act simply as a spacer or may serve to maintain the pin 9 in its position longitudinally with respect to the frame.

Having now described my invention, I claim:

1. A toy gun of the type described having a frame with a barrel projecting from one end thereof and a magazine mounted for rotation in said frame, pins positioned in said frame on each side of said magazine in parallel alignment with the axis of the barrel but displaced a distance therefrom for coaxially aligning a projectile adapted to be held in the magazine with the axis of the barrel said projectile extending from the sides of the magazine and positioned to engage said pins, said magazine having its axis of rotation parallel to that of the barrel and spaced to align the projectiles adapted to be held therein with the axis of the barrel as the magazine is rotated, spring means for tensioning the magazine for rotation at all times, a pin positioned in said magazine in a position to abut against said first named pins to prevent the unwinding of the spring, a firing arm pivoted to said frame, spring means for pivoting said firing arm to swing in an arc in the direction of said barrel against a projectile When positioned in said magazine and aligned with said barrel, whereby when a projectile is fired the magazine will automatically rotate into the next prefiring position.

2. A toy gun having a frame With a barrel and a magazine of the revolver type for holding prejectiles in position to be aligned with the bore of the gun positioned in a cavity in said frame supporting the barrel, shaft means in said frame mounting the magazine for free rotation about an axis for bringing the projectiles in alignment with the bore of the barrel, a helical spring coiled about said shaft means having one end attached to the frame near one end of the shaft means and the other end attached to the magazine near the other end of the shaft means whereby the magazine may be given a return spring torque when turned in the opposite direction, pins attached to said frame extending into said cavity on either side of said magazine for limiting the rotation of said magazine when the magazine has projectiles in place said projectiles extending from the sides of the magazine and positioned to engage said pins as the magazine is rotated, a pin in said magazine parallel to the position occupied by the projectiles in the magazine said pin being sufficiently short to be out of contact with the firing arm but long enough to engage said pins when the magazine has been turned to a given position, a firing arm, means pivotally mounting the firing arm in said frame for bringing it in contact with the end of each projectile successively, spring means for moving the firing arm against the projectile, said firing arm being positioned at the end of each firing for engaging the side of the next successive projectile to be fired.

3. A toy gun having a frame and a barrel and a magazine of the revolver type for holding projectiles in position to be aligned with the bore of the gun positioned in a cavity in said frame supporting the barrel, means mounting the magazine in said frame for free rotation about an axis for bringing the projectiles in alignment with the bore of the barrel, a segmental flange on one side of said frame adjacent the cavity extending outward substantially the same amount as the outer edge of the magazine, means supporting said flange on said frame for permitting movement of said flange away from said cavity for permitting the loading of the magazine, a coiled spring concentric with the axis of the magazine having one end attached to the frame and the other end attached to the magazine whereby the magazine may be given a return spring torque when turned in the opposite direction, projections attached to said frame extending into said cavity on either side of said magazine for limiting the rotation of said magazine when the magazine has projectiles in place said projectiles projecting from the sides of said magazine and positioned to engage said projections as the magazine is rotated, a pin in said magazine also positioned to engage said projections when the magazine is turned to a given position, a firing arm, means mounting the firing arm on said frame for bringing it in contact with the end of each projectile successively, spring means for moving the firing arm against the projectile, said firing arm being positioned at the end of each firing for engaging the side of the next successive projectile to be fired.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US83211 *Oct 20, 1868 Ezra rip ley
US1328929 *Jun 12, 1918Jan 27, 1920H K Toy & Novelty CoToy machine-gun
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3634964 *May 26, 1970Jan 18, 1972Nail Geary LSpace control rifle toy
US4267661 *Jan 21, 1980May 19, 1981Marvin Glass & AssociatesMultiple vehicle launcher
US4623145 *Feb 29, 1984Nov 18, 1986Indoor Archery, IncorporatedArchery/practice exercise device and attachments therefor
US4708341 *Nov 6, 1986Nov 24, 1987Indoor Archery International CorporationArchery/practice exercise device and attachments therefor
US5213089 *Aug 8, 1991May 25, 1993Hasbro, Inc.Toy gun
US6915792 *Apr 6, 2004Jul 12, 2005Chih-Sheng ShengPaintgun with a revolving disc for feeding paintballs
Classifications
U.S. Classification124/21, 124/29, 124/48
International ClassificationF41B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41B7/006
European ClassificationF41B7/00B