Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2709497 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 31, 1955
Filing dateFeb 4, 1954
Priority dateFeb 4, 1954
Publication numberUS 2709497 A, US 2709497A, US-A-2709497, US2709497 A, US2709497A
InventorsJoseph Phyl
Original AssigneeResearch Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical precipitator
US 2709497 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

HJWQAE? J. PHYL TRICAL PRECIPITATOR 3 W a M ELEC Filed Feb. 4, 1954 INVENTOR.

JOSEPH FHYL ATTORNEY ELECTRICAL PRECIPITATOR Joseph Phyl, Fanwood, N. J., assignor to Research Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application February 4, 1954, Serial No. 408,114

2. Claims. (Cl. 183-7) This invention relates to electrical precipitators and is particularly directed to electrical precipitators having liquid flush type collecting electrodes, and wherein the gas stream to be cleaned is passed successively through a plurality of precipitating units in series.

It is an object of the invention to provide such a precipitator wherein all of the precipitating units are encased in a single housing that is relatively simple in construction, extremely compact, and has good gas distribution to the various precipitating units.

A further object of the invention is to provide such a precipitator having a single precipitate outlet for the plurality of precipitating units.

A further object is to provide such a device which minimizes the necessity for outside lines which are expensive to construct and require a substantial amount of space, which is not always available.

These and other objects and advantages are provided by an electrical precipitator which generally comprises a shell having a plurality of banks of vertical type collecting electrodes and associated discharge electrodes, horizontally disposed header means in the shell supporting the collecting electrodes, a common sump in the shell below the banks of collecting electrodes for recovering a liquid from the electrodes, outlet means maintaining a predetermined liquid level in the sump, vertical partition members between the banks of collecting electrodes extending below the liquid level at the bottom end thereof and cooperating with the header means to define inlet plenum chambers in the shell around each of the banks of collecting electrodes below the header means, further vertical partition members extending above the header means and cooperating therewith to define outlet plenum chambers in the shell above each of the banks of collecting electrodes, gas inlet means into one of the inlet plenum chambers, gas passages through the header means from the outlet plenum chambers above each of the banks of collecting electrodes into the inlet plenum chamber around an adjacent bank of collecting electrodes, and gas outlet means from the outlet plenum chamber about the last in order of the banks of collecting electrodes whereby a stream of gas entering the gas inlet means is caused to pass upward through the collecting electrodes of each of said banks in series.

The invention will be more particularly described and the principles thereof illustrated in reference to the accompanying drawing showing in elevation and in partial section an electrical precipitator embodying teachings of the invention.

Referring to the drawing, It is the shell of a pressure type electrical precipitator within which are supported a plurality of liquid fiush type collecting electrode pipes 12. In the form of the invention shown in the drawing, the collecting electrodes are divided into two units generally designated A and B, and are vertically supported within the casing by means of header plates 14 and 16. The upper ends of the electrodes extend above the header plates and are surrounded by pools or ponds of flushing liquid supplied by means not shown in the drawing.

States Patent Fine wire discharge electrodes 18 extend centrally through the collecting pipe electrodes and are supported at their upper ends by high tension bus bar assemblies 20 as is well known in the art. The lower ends of the collecting electrodes discharge into a common sump generally indicated at 22 formed in the bottom of the precipitator shell. The sump 22 receives the flushing liquid from the electrodes and the precipitated material, which are then removed through outlet 24 and liquid seal outlet pipes 26. The outlet pipes 26 are positioned to maintain a predetermined liquid level in the sump as indicated in the drawing.

In the top of the shell 10 is a dirty gas inlet 28 which connects to a flue 3t) projecting through the header plate 14 and which discharges into an inlet plenum chamber 32 for electrode set A.

The gas within the inlet plenum chamber 32 is directed upwardly through the collecting tubes 12 by the vertical partition member 34 which extends from below the liquid level in the sump 22 to a position slightly higher than the header plate 14. The portion of the partition member 34 which extends above the header plate 14 cooperates therewith and with the sides of the casing 10 to form ponds or pools about the upper extension of the collecting pipe electrode 12. This portion of the partition also aids in starting the gas to be cleaned vertically downward for the second cleaning stage. A second vertical partition member 36 extending from the top of the casing downwardly to the header plate 16 cooperates therewith to define an inlet plenum chamber 38 and an outlet plenum chamber it? for electrode set B.

An outlet 42 for clean gas opens into the outlet plenum chamber 40.

in operation of the electrical precipitators of the invention, dirty gases enter the inlet 28, flow downwardly through conduit 30 and into the inlet plenum chamber 32 of electrode set A, up through the collecting elec trodes 12 of. set A, downwardly around vertical partition 34 and into inlet plenum chamber 38 of electrode set B, upwardly through collecting electrodes 12 of set B and into outlet plenum chamber 46 where the gases are discharged through outlet 42. The flushing liquid flowing downwardly through the pipes 12, removes the precipitated material from the electrodes and collects in the sump 22 from which the liquid and precipitate are removed through sump outlet 24 and pipes 26.

While the electrical precipitator hereinabove described and shown in the accompanying drawing comprises only two electrode sets, it will be evident that a plurality of such sets may be interconnected for serial flow without departing from the scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. An electrical precipitator comprising a shell, a plurality of banks of vertical pipe collecting electrodes and associated discharge electrodes, horizontally disposed header means in said shell supporting said collecting electrodes, a common sump in said shell below said banks of collecting electrodes for receiving liquid from said electrodes, outlet means maintaining a predetermined liquid level in said sump, vertical partition members between said banks of collecting electrodes extending below said liquid level at the bottom end thereof and cooperating with said header means to define inlet plenum chambers in said shell around each of said banks of collecting electrodes below said header means, further vertical parti tion members extending above said header means and cooperating therewith to define outlet plenum chambers in said shell above each or" said banks of collecting electrodes, gas inlet means into one of said inlet plenum chambers, gas passages through said header means from the outlet plenum chambers above each of said banks of collecting electrodes into the inlet plenum chamber 3 around an adjacent bank of collecting electrodes, and gas outlet means from the outlet plenum chamber about the last in order of said banks of collecting electrodes whereby a stream of gas entering said gas inlet means is caused to pass upward through the collecting electrodes of each of said banks in series.

2. An electrical precipitator comprising a shell, a bank of vertical pipe collecting electrodes and associated discharge electrodes, a horizontally disposed header plate in said shell supporting said bank of collecting electrodes, a second bank of vertical pipe collecting electrodes and associated discharge electrodes, a second horizontally disposed header plate in said shell supporting said second bank of collecting electrodes, a common sump in said shell below said banks of collecting electrodes for receiving liquid from said electrodes, outlet means maintaining a predetermined liquid level in said sump, a vertical partition member between said banks of collecting electrodes extending below said liquid level at the bottom end thereof and cooperating with said header plate to define an inlet plenum chamber in said shell around said bank of collllecting electrodes below said header plate, a second vertical partition member extending above said second header plate and cooperating therewith to define an outlet plenum chamber in said shell above the second bank of collecting electrodes, gas inlet means in the top of the shell and communicating with said inlet plenum chamber, a gas' References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 6 Seaman May 30, 1916 6 Schmidt et a1 Nov. 14, 1916 9 Home Apr. 14, 1931 as s

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1185136 *Nov 5, 1915May 30, 1916Harry J SeamanApparatus for burning cement and recovering the resulting dust.
US1204906 *Jul 23, 1914Nov 14, 1916Research CorpMethod and means for recovering certain constituents from gaseous bodies.
US1800529 *Feb 27, 1929Apr 14, 1931Int Precipitation CoMethod and apparatus for electrical precipitation
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2814360 *Dec 12, 1955Nov 26, 1957Research CorpMethod of electrical precipitation
US3443362 *Jul 13, 1965May 13, 1969Paul Richard EbertPrecipitator
US5160510 *Mar 31, 1991Nov 3, 1992Metallgesellschaft AktiengesellschaftProcess and apparatus for purifying dust- and pollutant-containing exhaust gases
US5395430 *Jul 18, 1994Mar 7, 1995Wet Electrostatic Technology, Inc.Electrostatic precipitator assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification96/45
International ClassificationB03C3/16, B03C3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB03C3/16
European ClassificationB03C3/16