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Publication numberUS2710037 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 7, 1955
Filing dateOct 20, 1952
Priority dateOct 20, 1952
Publication numberUS 2710037 A, US 2710037A, US-A-2710037, US2710037 A, US2710037A
InventorsEdward S Caldwell
Original AssigneeEdward S Caldwell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper currency savings receptacle for babies
US 2710037 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 7, 1955 v E. s. CALDWELL 2,710,037

' PAPER CURRENCY SAVINGS RECEPTACLE FOR BABIES Filed Oct. 20, 1952 mospeuosucs SQUARE PHILADELPHIA PA.

ESTABLISHED I776 IN V EN TOR.

la mw a'mw PAPER CURRENCY SAVINGS RECEPTACLE FOR BABIES Edward S. Caldwell, Park Ridge, Ill.

Application October 20, 1952, Serial No. 315,745

1 Claim. (Cl. 150-38) The principal object of this invention is to provide an improved paper currency savings receptacle for babies like as an advertising medium for opening new savings accounts.

Briefly, the paper currency savings receptacle for babies includes a colored opaque sheet of flexible thermoplastic material in the shape of a bootee having front, bottom and rear edges forming a toe, sole and heel and a top edge. It also includes a transparent sheet of flexible thermoplastic material also in the shape of a bootee having front, bottom and rear edges forming a toe, sole and heel and a top edge. The two sheets of flexible thermoplastic material are congruent, except that the top edge of the transparent sheet extends beyond the top edge of the colored opaque sheet to form a closure flap. The sheets are marginally fused together at their front, bottom and rear edges to form a bootee-shaped receptacle which is opaque on one side and transparent on the other side, which has a toe, sole and heel and an open top for receiving the paper currency, and which has a transparent closure flap foldable over the top edge of the opaque side. A snap fastener having a male and female part is carried by the opaque side of the bootee and by the flap for releasably securing the closure flap in closed position. The paper currency deposited into the savings receptacle is visible through the transparent side of the receptacle. The opaque side of the receptacle having the snap fastener thereon is provided with printed material which is normally visible when the snap fastener and closure flap are manipulated.

The paper currency savings receptacle described briefly above is particularly adaptable for use as an advertising medium for opening new savings accounts. When a bank or the like learns of the birth of a baby, it may send a savings receptacle to the baby as a gift by enclosing the same in a small envelope along with a note or letter directly to the baby suggesting the opening of a savings account.

Parents will be pleased to receive the savings receptacle, for newborn babies often receive paper currency as gifts and the savings receptacle forms a unique, satisfactory and pleasurable depository for such paper currency. The shape is appropriate for babies and the opaque side may be colored pink for girls and blue for boys to add additional appeal. It is flexible and durable and easy to manipulate. Paper currency deposited therein is at all times visible through the transparent side. The closure flap extends over the opaque side of the receptacle so that as it and its snap fastener are normally manipulated, the printed material, such as the name of the bank, is visible to act as a constant reminder for the parents to open a bank account for the baby at the designated bank. After paper currency is deposited in the savings receptacle, it may be brought to the bank for banking purposes. The savings receptacle is of such a shape and is small enough so as to be sent, if so desired, with its enclosed paper currency in a standard letter-sized envelope through nited States Patent themail to the bank at usual postage rates for banking purposes when the bank account is first opened and for of bank saving for the baby. When received at the bank the savingsreceptacle is also considerably more easy to handle than the conventional cumbersome mechanical baby banks.

Further objects of this invention reside in the details of construction of the paper currency savings receptacle and in the cooperative relationships between the component parts thereof.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon reference th 0 an 'n s e ification, claim and drawin which is particularly adaptable for use by banks and the to e ace mp yl g P c g in which:

Fig. l' is a side elevational view of the paper currency savings receptacle looking at the colored opaque side and with the closure flap closed;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view of the paper currency savings receptacle looking at the transparent side with the closure flap open and with a dollar bill deposited therein; and

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view through the paper currency savings receptacle taken substantially along the line 33 of Fig. 2.

The paper currency savings receptacle for babies is generally designated at 10. It includes a colored opaque sheet of flexible thermoplastic material 11 such as a vinyl resin, a cellulose acetate resin, or any other flexible thermoplastic sheet material. The sheet 11 is in the shape of a bootee and has a front edge 12, a bottom edge 13 and a rear edge 14 forming a toe, sole, and heel and it also has a top edge 15. The savings receptacle 10 also includes a transparent sheet of flexible thermoplastic material 16 such as a vinyl resin, a cellulose acetate resin or any other thermoplastic sheet of material. It is in the shape of a bootee and has a front edge 17, a bottom edge 18 and a rear edge 19 forming a toe, sole and heel and it also has a top edge 20.

The two sheets 11 and 16 are congruent except that the top edge 20 of the transparent sheet 16 extends beyond the top edge 15 of the colored opaque sheet 11 to form a closure flap 21. The two sheets 11 and 16 are marginally fused together as indicated at 22 at their front, bottom and rear edges to form a bootee shaped receptacle, the fusing being accomplished in any desired manner as by heat sealing, electronic welding or the like. The bootee-shaped savings receptacle is opaque on one side and transparent on the other side and has a toe, sole and heel and an open top. It also has a transparent closure flap 21 which is foldable over the top edge 15 of the opaque side 11. A snap fastener is provided for releasably securing the closure flap 21 in closed position. It includes a male part 24 secured to the opaque side 11 of the receptacle and a female portion 25 secured to the flap 21.

When the snap fastener is released and the flap 21 is opened, paper currency in the form of dollar bills 27 may be inserted through the open end into the savings receptacle and after the dollar bills are so inserted, the closure flap 21 may be closed and secured in closed position by the snap fastener. The paper currency thus deposited into the savings receptacle is visible through the transparent side 16 of the receptacle as illustrated in Fig. 2 so that the contents of the savings receptacle may at all times be observed. The opaque side 11 of the receptacle has printed material 29 thereon, such as the name of a bank or the like. In the normal opening and closing of the snap fastener and the closure flap, the printed material 29 is visible and brought to the attention of the person manipulating the snap fastener and closure flap.

As described above, the paper currency savings receptacle 111 is particularly adaptable for use as an advertising medium for opening new savings accounts for babies and it has proven very successful toward this end.

While for purposes of illustration one form of this invention has been disclosed, other forms thereof may become apparent to those skilled in the art upon reference to this disclosure and, therefore, this invention is to be limited only by the scope of the appended claim.

I claim as my invention:

A paper currency savings receptacle for babies comprising a colored opaque sheet of flexible thermoplastic material in the shape of a bootee having front, bottom and rear edges forming a toc, sole and heel and a top edge, a transparent sheet of flexible thermoplastic material also in the shape of a bootee having front, bottom and rear edges forming a toe, sole and heel and a top edge, said sheets being congruent except that the top edge of the transparent sheet extends beyond the top edge of the colored opaque sheet to form a closure flap, said sheets being marginally fused together at their front, bottom and rear edges to form a bootee shaped receptacle opaque on one side and transparent on the other side and having a toe, sole and heel and an open top for receiving the paper currency and having a transparent closure flap foldable over the top edge of the opaque side, and a snap fastener carried by the opaque side of the receptacle and by the flap for releasably securing the closure flap in closed position, said paper currency being visible through the transparent side of the receptacle.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 637,365 Weaver Nov. 21, 1899 1,214,282 Day Jan. 30, 1917 1,390,718 Lover Sept. 13, 1921 1,679,807 Bohl Aug. 7, 1928 1,693,266 Baldwin n Nov. 27, 1928 1,854,546 Goldwyn u; Apr. 19, 1932 2,132,337 Whiternan Oct. 4, 1938 2,584,633 Southwick Feb. 5, 1952 2,587,033 Dobbs et a1. Feb. 26, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US637365 *Sep 15, 1899Nov 21, 1899Frank S WeaverPocket-book.
US1214282 *Sep 4, 1915Jan 30, 1917Nellie S DayEquipment device.
US1390718 *Aug 21, 1919Sep 13, 1921Lover William EIntegral envelop and bag
US1679807 *Mar 14, 1923Aug 7, 1928Lewis Bohl AlexanderCombined check-book holder and bill fold
US1693266 *Nov 1, 1927Nov 27, 1928Rosecrans BaldwinSeed bag
US1854546 *May 2, 1930Apr 19, 1932Goldwyn George IMethod of treating used burlap bags
US2132337 *Apr 16, 1937Oct 4, 1938Whiteman Benjamin WTransparent garment protector
US2584633 *Nov 9, 1945Feb 5, 1952Shellmar Products CorpContainer with fused reinforced seam
US2587033 *Sep 16, 1949Feb 26, 1952Dobbs Frank GPurse construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2897865 *Sep 8, 1958Aug 4, 1959Sidney JackmanCombined child's handbag and carrying package
US2909202 *Oct 29, 1957Oct 20, 1959Rock Allan LCombined wallet, data file and calendar construction
US3438415 *Jan 11, 1967Apr 15, 1969Prince Gardner Co IncFrench purse
US4679688 *Sep 12, 1984Jul 14, 1987Soederholm JanPackage for risk samples
US4716948 *Jul 10, 1986Jan 5, 1988Brissette Ronald APari-mutuel bettor's organizing wallet
US6151823 *Nov 7, 1998Nov 28, 2000Gregory-Gillman; AnitaTransparent protective collectible tag holder
US6410065Jun 23, 1992Jun 25, 2002Nottingham-Spirk Design Associates, Inc.Expansible food container
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/86, 150/143, 383/106, 383/907
International ClassificationA45C1/12
Cooperative ClassificationY10S383/907, A45C1/12
European ClassificationA45C1/12