Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2711993 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1955
Filing dateMay 1, 1951
Priority dateMay 1, 1951
Publication numberUS 2711993 A, US 2711993A, US-A-2711993, US2711993 A, US2711993A
InventorsAlbert Lyon George
Original AssigneeAlbert Lyon George
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for conveying cylindrical articles through a bath
US 2711993 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 28, 1955 L 2,711,993

APPARATUS FOR CONVEYING CYLINDRICAL ARTICLES THROUGH A BATH 3 Shee'ts-Sheet 1 Filed May 1, '1951 G. A. LYON June 28, 1955 APPARATUS FOR CONVEYING CYLINDRICAL ARTICLES THROUGH A BATH Filed May 1 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 [27 z E m E 2" $504265 .4; 55,97- Z {01v G. A. LYON June 28, 1955 APPARATUS FOR CONVEYING CYLINDRICAL ARTICLES THROUGH A BATH 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed May 1, 1951 [Hz En far 62-02 as zfzss/erlyazv United States Patent APPARATUS FOR CONVEYING CYLINDRIQAL ARTICLES THROUGH A BATH George Albert Lyon, Detroit, Mich.

Application May 1, 1951, Serial No. 223,860

7 Claims. (Cl. 204203) The present invention'relates to a method of and apparatus for conveying articles through a bath, and more particularly this invention relates to a method and apparatus for supporting and conveying articles for individual subjection to treating and/ or finishing procedures involving the use of one ormore fluid baths through which the articles are carried in a continuous operation.

More specifically, the present invention is particularly adapted for the subjection of metallic articles to electroprocessing, such as electropolishing, electrocleaning, electroplating, etc., and the preferred and illustrated embodiment of the instant invention is so utilized for the electroprocessing of elongated cylindrical articles,.such as shell casings. It will be realized, however, that the utility of the" instant invention is not limited to this specific embodiment.

in the manufacture of shell casings in the range of from 60 mm. to 105 mm. sizes, ithas been proposed that the casings be drawn or otherwise fabricated of steel and then electroplated inside and outside with a non-corrodible metal, such as 'zinc or thelike. Since the shell casings are of cylindrical form and are relatively deep in relation to their transverse dimension, it will be appreciated that considerable difficulty hasbeen encountered in electroplating the interior surfaces of such casings. Further, such casings are made in very large quantities, and a continuous plating process and apparatus must be utilized for their economical manufacture and finishing.

The present inventioninow provides an apparatus and method for the electro-processing of cylindrical articles by'conveying the articles in a continuous fashion through a plurality of electro'processing baths, while continuously rotating the article and shifting the longitudinal axis of the article during insertion and removal of the article from each bath to promote drainage and filling of the article with the electrolyte or other fluid used during the Q processing.

It is, therefore, an important object of the present invention to provide an improved method and apparatus for conveying articles through a plurality of treating or finishing baths.

Another important object of the present invention is to provide an improved apparatus for conveying an article through a plurality of successive treating zones, including means for vertically shifting the longitudinal axis of the article in accordance with its progress through the zones, together with means for rotating the article during processing.

It is a further important object of thepresent invention to provide a method for the subjection of arr-article to a plurality of successive treating baths by elevating and lowering the article for submersion within the individual baths, simultaneously shifting the longitudinal axis of the article to accommodate drainage of processing fluid from the interior thereof, and rotating the article during its subjection to the fluid.

Another important feature of thepresent invention resides inthe provision of conveying means traveling in a single substantially horizontal plane along a plurality of successive aligned baths, the conveying means carrying therewith a vertically tiltable carriage which moves vertically with respect to both the conveying means and the baths to elevate and lower an article for submersion within the baths and for shifting the longitudinal axis of the article.

it is an additional object of the present invention to provide an improved article conveying means including a conveying apparatus movable in a single plane and a tiltable carriage movable with the conveying means to travel therewith and movable with respect to the conveying means to shift the longitudinal axis of an article carried thereby.

A further important feature of the present invention resides in the utilization of a stationary electro-processing electrode contact member in electrically conducting relation with an article being processed for retaining the article in submerged position in the interior of a processing bath and for efiiecting rotation of the article by virtue of physical contact therebetween, and in the utilization of an additional electrode in the interior of a hollow object to carry the object for movement therewith through a processing bath.

Thus, still another object of the present invention is the provision of an electro-processing apparatus having an electrode contact member directly overlying the processing bath for contacting an article being processed to retain the same in effective electrically conductive relation and to retain the article in substantially submerged condition within the bath, the frictional contact between the article andthe electrode contact member effecting relative rotation therebetween.

Yet another important object of the present invention is the provision of a conveying means having a vertisally tiltable electrode for supporting an article within an electroprocessing oath and for accommodating rotation of the article as the same is moved through the bath.

A further important feature of the present invention resides in the utilization of a continuously-drivenendless conveying means having upper and lower horizontal reaches and carrying a relatively tiltable carriage which is retained upon an upper supporting surface by gravity as the same passes along the upper horizontal reach of the conveying means and retained against gravitational displacement as the same travels along the lower horizontal reach of the conveying means.

Other and further important objects of this invention will be apparent from the disclosures in the specification and the accompanying drawings.

On the drawings:

Figure l is a side elevational view of a conveying apparatus of the present invention which is adapted .to

carry out the method of the present invention;

Figure 2 is a fragmentary'plan elevational view of a portion of the conveying apparatus of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a vertical sectional View, With parts shown in elevation, taken alongthe plane llllll. of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a vertical sectional view taken along the plane .lViV of Figure 3, and with parts shown in elevation;

Figure 5 is a vertical sectional view, with parts shown in elevation, taken along the plane V-V of Figure 1;

Figure 6 is a longitudinal sectional view illustrating an inert electrode of the apparatus of Figures l-Sand having portions thereof shown in elevation;

Figure 7 is a vertical sectional view taken along the plane Vli-V.ll of Figure 6; and

Figured is a vertical sectional view taken along the plane ViIl- /lli of Figure 6. Y

As shown on the drawings:

In Figure 1, reference numeral refers generally to an apparatus of the present invention, including a plurality of processing tanks 11, 12, 13 and 14. The tanks are arranged in functional, substantially horizontal alignment, and it will be appreciated that any number of tanks may be utilized in conjunction with the apparatus of the present invention. Further, the tanks may contain any desired type of fluid finishing or treating baths, such, for example, as electro-processing baths or the like. In a typical electroplating application, the tank 11 may contain an electrocleaning bath, such as a reversecurrent plating bath; the tank 12 may contain an HCl pickling bath; the tank 13 may contain a cyanide-type zinc electroplating bath; and the tank 14 may contain a conventional dichromate-type anozinc bath.

The baths 11-14 are joined by a continuous, horizontally elongated trough 16 (Figures l3, inclusive), the trough comprising a bottom wall 17 and upstanding side walls 18 preferably formed integrally with the bottom wall 17 and projecting thereabove. The trough 16 is preferably formed of sheet metal and extends throughout the entire length of the aligned tanks 11-14, inclusive, the trough extending through the transverse end walls of each of the tanks with the trough bottom wall 17 preferably lying beneath the level A of fluid within each tank. It will be appreciated that a fluid-tight seal or the like is provided between the trough 16 and each tank end wall, so that leakage of the bath from each tank is prevented. The trough upstanding side walls 18 1 carry thereon parallel, coextensive, U-type conveyor channel beams 19, and these channel beams 19 also project not only through the entire trough length but also therebeyond to form an endless conveyor track having substantially parallel upper and lower reaches 20 and 21, respectively, and arcuate end joining reaches 22 joining the upper and lower reaches 20 and 21.

Positioned intermediate the channels 19 are a plurality of transversely extending, longitudinally spaced conconveyor frames 23 (Figures 2 and 3) which are provided with upper central web portions 24, preferably formed of sheet metal or the like and provided with downturned, substantially parallel legs 26. Each leg 26 journals a pair of longitudinally spaced flanged conveyor wheels 27, and each wheel is secured to its flange 26 by suitable means, as by a wheel axle having a threaded end 28 receiving a locking nut 29 thereon.

Thus, it will be seen that the conveyor frames 23 are supported by the channel beams 19 for movement therealong, and a given frame 23 will travel throughout the entire closed path of the parallel channel beams 19. Movement of the frames between the beams is accomplished by means of conveyor chains 30 composed of a plurality of aligned conveyor links 31 joined by connecting links 32. The conveyor links 31 take the form of transversely spaced and aligned link arms positioned on either side of the links 32 and received between link brackets 33 welded or otherwise secured to the undersurface of the web portion 24 of each of the frames 23, the link brackets 32 being joined to the conveyor links 31 by means of link pins 33. A pair of link pins is provided for each conveyor frame, and the pins 33 serve to retain the conveyor links 31 and the connector links 32 in assembled relation while accommodating relative pivotal movement therebetween, as well as retaining the conveyor frames upon the chain 30.

The chains 30 are driven by means of rotatable sprockets 36 located at each end of the horizontal runs 20 and 21 of the channels 19. A sprocket 36 is provided at each end of the horizontal run for each of the conveyor chains 30, and the sprockets are provided with radially outwardly extending sprocket teeth 37 which are received by the connecting links 31 of the chains 30. It will be noted from Figures 3 and 4 that the link arms of links 31 are positioned on either side of the connecting links 32,

4 so that a space is provided between the separate portions of the conveyor links 31 to receive the sprocket teeth 37 therebetween. Actually, the sprocket teeth 37 abut the ends of the connecting links 32 lying between the conveyor chain links 31 to impart forward motion to the chains 30. It will also be noted that the entire undersurface of the conveyor frames 23 is open and entirely unrestricted so that access of the conveyor sprocket teeth 37 to the conveyor chains is accommodated. It will, of course, be appreciated that the trough 16 extends only along the upper run or reach 20 of the chains, so that there is no interference with the sprocket drive action by the trough.

Thus, the conveyor frames are driven positively in a substantially horizontal path along the upper beam reach 20 by the hereinbefore described chain and sprocket drive. The path of horizontal travel is coextensive with the functionally aligned tanks 11-14, and transverse and/or tilting movement of the frames is prevented by the engagement of the frame wheels 27 with the guide rails or beams 19.

Each conveyor frame 23 is provided with spaced upstanding ears 38, either formed integrally with the web portion 24 of the frame or else secured thereto, as by welding, to project upwardly therebeyond at the leading and trailing edges of the frame. These cars 38 carry therebetween a carriage pivot pin 39 (Figures 3 and 4) for each frame 23, each pin serving to support a pair of conveyor carriage sections 40 thereon, while accommodating tilting movement of the carriage sections 40 from and through a horizontal plane. More particularly, each carriage section 40 comprises a carriage plate 41 which projects laterally outwardly from the pin 39 to overlie the associated conveyor frame 23, and each carriage plate 41 is secured to a hinge plate 42 which has a re-entrant curved end portion 43 encircling a major portion of the periphery of the pin 39. Each hinge plate 42 is preferably provided with a pair of spaced re-entrant portions 43 (Figure 2) which are interleaved with the corresponding portions 43 of the other hinge plate 42 secured to the associated carriage plate 41 carried by the same conveyor frame 23. An insulating sleeve 44 formed of rubber, plastic, or similar insulating material, is preferably interposed between the hinge pin 39 and the associated reentrant curved portions of the hinge plates 42, and an insulating block or collar 46 is interposed between the hinge plates 42 and the frame cars 38. In this manner, the carriage sections 40 are electrically insulated from the conveyor frames 23 and the conveying means carried thereby without interference with pivotal movement of the carriage sections 40, for reasons to be hereinafter more fully explained.

Each carriage plate 41 extends outwardly beyond the associated conveyor frame 23 to overlie the adjacent channel beam 19, and that portion of each carriage plate 41 overlying the beam 19 is apertured, as at 47, to receive therethrough a peripheral portion of a tire 48, preferably formed of insulating material. Each tire 48 is disposed upon an axle 49 which is journaled for rotation within depending bracket cars 50 integrally formed in and struck from the carriage plate 41. Obviously, that portion of the carriage plate 41 which has been removed to form the aperture 47 may be deflected downwardly to underlie the carriage plate, thereby providing the brackets 50. The periphery of each tire 48 is adapted to bear upon the free upper surface of the channel 19 in rolling contact therewith.

That portion of each carriage plate 41 which projects outwardly beyond the channel beam 19 is deflected downwardly, as at 51 (Figure 3), to normally lie in a substantially vertical plane when the associated tire 48 is in rolling contact with the upper surface of the beam 19. The vertical leg 51 thus formed carries at its lower free end an inert electrode 52 which is preferably integrally formed with, or alternately secured to, the carriage plate leg 51. The electrode 52 may be either an anode or a cathode, depending upon the direction of current flow through the electro-processing bath. For example, in an electroplating bath, the electrode 52 is an anode, while in an electropolishing apparatus, the electrode 52 is a cathode.

The inert electrode 52 is particularly illustrated in Figures 6-8 of the drawings and comprises an elongated terminal portion 53. This terminal portion 53 of the inert electrode is of concavo-convex cross-sectional configuration and is actually formed as a cylindrical segment. The terminal portion 53 of the electrode is joined to the depending leg 51 of the carriage plate by means of an upwardly dished intermediate anode portion 54 and a joining portion 56. The terminal portion 53 is apertured, as at 57, adjacent the intermediate portion 53 and the joining portion 56 is apertured, as at 58, immediately adjacent the downturned leg 51 for reasons to be hereinafter more fully explained.

The inert electrode terminal portion 53 is provided at its free end with an upstanding bracket 59 bridging the upturned edges of the concave-convex portion to extend therebetween. The bracket 59 threadedly receives a roller pin 60 upon which is journaled a generally cylindrical roller 61 projecting above the portion 53. The portion 53 is provided with an additional bracket 62 immediately adjacent the intermediate portion 54, the bracket 62 also joining the upturned edges of the concaveconvex electrode portion 53 and receiving a pair of laterally spaced and aligned roller pins 63 upon which are journaled rollers 64.

The inert electrode portion 53, as illustrated in Figures 6-8, inclusive, is adapted to support thereon an object to be conveyed, such as a generally cylindrical shell casing S having an integrally formed end wall W at one end and a reduced diameter projectile-receiving other end N, and the inert electrode 52 is adapted to be inserted into the interior of the casing S with the rollers 61 and 64 contacting the inner periphery thereof at points spaced along the axial length of the casing S. Actually, the roller 61 contacts the casing interior adjacent the end wall W thereof, while the spaced rollers 64 contact the inner periphery of the casing adjacent a frusto-conical joining portion P. The exterior surface of the rolls 64 is slightly reduced at one end, as at 66, to conform to the contour of the frusto-conical portion P. The offset portion 56 of the inert electrode 52 and the curved intermediate portion 53 are provided so that the undersurface of the concavo-convex inert electrode 52 is in constantly spaced relation to the corresponding portions of the cas ing interior.

The casing is retained upon the inert electrode by means of an exterior roller 67 which is carried by the downturned leg 51 of the carriage plate 41 immediately adjacent the open end of the casing. The roller 67 comprises a main body portion 68, a reduced diameter outer portion 69 adapted to contact the exterior periphery of the casing C at the casing opening, and a frusto-conicai body portion 76 joining the portions 68 and 69. The roller 67 is axially apertured to receive a roller pin 71 threadedly retained by a tapped hole in. the depending leg 51. It will be seen that the casing S is securely fastened against axial movement upon the rolls. The forward curved portion 66 of the roll 64 prevents outward axial movement of the casing, while the open end of the casing abuts the frusto-conical surface 79 of the roller 67. Further, the casing is slightly tensioned by action of the rollers 61 and 67 disposed on either side of the rolls 64, and this tensioning, together with the axial positioning function of the rollers 64 and 67, as hereinbefore described, prevents any displacement of the casing S.

From Figures 1 and 3, it will be seen that upstanding cam brackets 73 are provided in spaced relation along the length of the upper reach 26 of the channel beam 19. More particularly, the cam brackets 73 are in the form of straps or the like which are welded or otherwise secured to the upper surface 45 of each of the channel irons 19 to project thereabove. A cam bracket is positioned adjacent each end tank 11 and 14 and, between adjacent tanks, an additional cam bracket is positioned. Each bracket is provided with an upwardly and forwardly inclined front surface 74, a substantially horizontal surface 75, and a downwardly and forwardly inclined rear surface 76. Of those brackets positioned intermediate adjacent tanks 11-14, the horizontal surface '75 bridges the gap between the tanks and overlies the adjacent tank end Walls. Of the brackets 73 adjacent the ends of the terminal tanks, the horizontal surface 75 overlies the terminal tank end wall. The rising bracket front surface 74 provides means for elevating each carriage section 40 as the carriages are moved from the tank, while the downward surface '76 lowers the carriage for entry into the next adjacent tank. The surfaces 7476 are adapted to be contacted by the tires 48 carried by each carriage section 40, and it will be appreciated that the carriage sections are individually tilted vertically, as indicated in dotted outline in Figure 3, as the tires 48 ride upon the bracket surfaces. It will be noted that the slope of the rising surface 74 is less steep than the slope of the lowering surface 76.

Not only will the carriage be tilted as above described and the casing elevated thereby, but the longitudinal axis of the casing will be inclined in a vertical plane by elevation of the carriage section, so that drainage of fluid or liquid from the interior of the casing wiil be promoted. Such drainage is also promoted by the apertures 57 and 58 in the electrode 52. Thus, in the electrode 52, as each conveyor frame 24 emerges from the tank, the tires 48 of the carriage sections carried by the frame Will be forced up the upwardly inclined surfaces 74 to elevate the carriage sections, thereby tilting the longitudinal axis of the casing carried thereby, and liquid from the casing interior will drain into the tank from which the casing is emerging. The horizontal surface 75 is of sufficient height above the upper surface of the channel iron 19 so that the casing and the associated carriage frame will clear the end walls of the tanks. The carriage tire 43, while contacting the downwardly sloping surface 76, will serve to submerge the casing S below the liquid or fiuid level A in the next successive tank, so that treatment or processing of the casing may be accomplished.

V The more shallow slope of the surfaces 74 will provide a sufficiently slow rate of axis elevation to insure adequate drainage of bath fluid from the casing S as the casing is removed from a tank, While the steeper slope of the surfaces 76 will rapidly plunge the casing S into U the next adjacent bath.

As best illustrated in Figures 1 and 3, each electroprocessing tank 11-14, inclusive, is provided with a disintegrable or active electrode 78 in the lower portion thereof and With an active electrode contact member 79 supported by a support arm 80 extending over the tank and having the cathode suspended therefrom to project downwardly into the tank interior. In the case of electroplating apparatus, the electrode 78 is the anode and source of metal ions, while the electrode contact member 79 is the cathode. Each cathode contact member 79 is provided with a lower surface 81 which abuts a portion of the casing which projects above the fluid level A in the tank, and the casing continues to contact the cathode undersurface 81 during travel of the casing through each tank substantially beneath the fluid level A therein. The casing also contacts a leading edge 82 of the cathode contact member 79 as the casing enters the tank, the leading edge being curved so as to contact the casing and force the casing under the level of fluid therein. As the casing emerges from the tank, it contacts atrailing edge 33 of the cathode contact mern er 79, and this edge accommodates ele vation of the casing by riding of the casing tire 48 up the cam bracket elevation surface 74, as hereinbefore described. It will be seen that the curvature of the leading and trailing edges 82 and 83 of each cathode contact member 79 is correlated with the slope of the adjacent surfaces 76-74, respectively, of the adjacent cam bracket 73. The cathode contact member, in retaining the casing S in the bath, tensions the depending arm 51 of the carriage 40 so that good electrical contact between the cathode contact member 79 and the casing S is insured.

It will be seen that current flow from each anode 78 to each cathode contact member '79 occurs through the body of electrotype or other fluid disposed within each tank 11-14. The cathode contact member contacts the exterior surface of the casing and there is no physical contact between the cathode contact member and the electrolyte disposed within the tank, so that any current flow to the cathode contact member must take place through the casing S which is in contact therewith. The anode 52 is inert only in that this anode is not consumed.

The anode 52 is connected to the anode side of the current by means of a bus bar 85 which is carried by the upstanding side walls 18 of the trough 16 and insulated therefrom by suitable insulation, as at 86. An anode contact clip 87 is carried by the downturned leg 51 of each carriage section 40, this clip being secured to the carriage leg 51 by suitable means, as by bolts 88, so that the clip contacts the bus bar to furnish electricity to the anode 52.

The carriage tires 48 follow the upper surface of the channel iron 19 by the gravitational effect of the carriage section weight, the weight of the inert anode 52, and the weight of the casing S. The same gravitational effect insures the following of contoured cam brackets 73 by the tires 48. However, it will be appreciated that pivotal displacement of the carriage sections 40 would be possible upon the return reaches or the lower horizontal reach 21 of the channel iron 19. For this reason, a carriage support bracket 89 is provided to be contacted by the carriage tires 48, and the bracket 89 is positioned in parallel spaced relation to the turning portions 22 of the channel irons l9 and to'the return or lower horizontal reach 21 thereof. As illustrated in Figure 5, the bracket surfaces 89 thus support the carriage sections 40 against displacement about pivot pins 39.

As hereinbefore explained, the tires 48 are preferably formed of rubber or similar electrically insulating material so that there is no flow of electricity from the charged carriage sections 40 to the channel irons 19 in the remainder of the conveying means. Similarly, the insulating sleeve 44 is interposed between the carriage sections and the conveyor frames 23, and the insulating blocks 46 are positioned intermediate the carriage section hinges 43 and the frame ears 38. Ob-

viously, the rollers 61, 64 and 67 should be formed of material which is inert with respect to the electrolyte or other processing fluid disposed within the tanks 11-14. It has been found that a methyl-methacrylate resin, such as lucite, may be utilized for this purpose. The rollers not only serve to support the casing S upon the inert anode for carriage therewith and with the carriage frames, but the rollers also accommodate rotation of the casing about its longitudinal axis. Such rotation is obtained by frictional contact between the exposed surface of the casing and the undersurface 81 of the cathode contact member 79. This frictional contact causes rolling which is accommodated by the rollers, this rolling being accomplished only during contact of the casing with cathode contact member.

Inasmuch as the cathode contact members 79 for the adjacent baths are separated one from another, it will be appreciated that cathode current reversal will be readily accommodated, so that an electropolishing bath and an electroplating bath may be accommodated by utilization of a single apparatus. It will also be ap-' preciated that the bus bars for adjacent baths may be oppositely charged, as well as the anodes 78.

Thus, it will be seen that the present invention provides an effective and novel conveying means for carrying articles through a fluid processing bath. Althrough the apparatus is particularly adapted for utiliza' tion in electro-processing, it will be appreciated that substantially the same apparatus may be utilized for salt bath annealing, for pickling, and for many other fluid treating processes.

The number of tanks 11-14 which may be alignedalong the path of movement of the conveying means may be infinitely varied, particularly since the weight of the articles being conveyed into the conveying means itself.

is not supported by the chain or other driving meansbut rather is supported by rigid conveyor roller guide means,- such'as the channel irons 19. In this manner, the linksbetween the sprockets may be extended to any desired extent.

The novel coaction of the cam brackets 73 and the cathode contact members 79 to immerse and remove thearticle from the bath will be appreciated, as will the novel! arrangement of utilizing the cathode contact member as the means for effecting rotation of the cylindrical object being treated about its longitudinal axis. the longitudinal axis of the article in a vertical plane will likewise be appreciated inasmuch as it promotes the self-- drainage of the article, thereby preventing the carrying-- over of treating solution or fluid from one tank to the adjacent tank.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. In an apparatus for conveying a cylindrical article through a liquid processing bath, a pair of parallel substantially horizontal conveyor tracks extending along the length of said bath, a conveyor frame movable along said tracks, means for driving said frame therealong, a pair of conveyor carriages mounted on said frame for movement therewith and extending laterally therebeyond, said carriages each having a depending resilient leg terminating in an outwardly projecting extension adapted to be submerged within said bath and to be moved through said bath by the associated carriage, spaced rollers carried by said extension for rotation on axes generally parallel to said extension; said extension and said rollers being adapted to receive said article thereover in telescopic relation, an additional roller carried by said depending leg for contacting an exterior surface of said article, and a depending electrode contact member disposed above the path of movement of said extension through said bath to provide a lower camrning surface adapted to contact an exterior surface of said article to tension said depending resilient arm and to retain said extension and said article submerged within said bath.

2. In an apparatus for processing and treating a tubular article in a bath, conveying means for conveying an article through the bath, an electrode sWingably supported on said conveying means and extending trans' versely of the bath for pivotal movement into and out o the bath during longitudinal movement of said conveyin g means, article supporting roller means carried by said electrode for rotatably supporting a tubular article thereon partially submerged in the bath, and contacting means for engaging the exterior exposed portion of the article above the bath and extending longitudinally of the bath above the submerged position of said electrode, said contacting means facing said roller means and cooperable therewith to impart rotation to the article as said conveying means moves said electrode longitudinally of the bath.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 further characterized by said electrode comprising a non-consumable electrode The tilting of and by said roller means comprising rollers spaced longitudinally of the electrode and carried by an upper side of the electrode in engagement with the inner surface of the tubular article at the top of the bath.

4. The apparatus of claim 2 further characterized by said electrode having at least a portion thereof formed resilient and by the provision of means along the side of the bath to tension said electrode in the retention of the electrode and article submerged within the bath.

5. In an apparatus for processing and treating a tubular article in a bath, conveying means for conveying an article through the bath, an elongated electrode swingably supported on said conveying means and extending transversely of the bath for pivotal movement into and out of a submerged position in the oath during longitudinal movement of said conveying means, article supporting roller means rotatably carried by said electrode for rotatably supporting a tubular article with the electrode extending into the interior of the article and the roller means engaging the interior surface of the article and spacing the article from said electrode, the periphery of said roller means being insulated from said electrode to mount the article in insulated. relation to said electrode, an elongated electrode contact member extending longitudinally of the bath and spaced above said roller means and said electrode with the electrode in submerged position in said bath, said electrode contact member being operative to engage an exterior portion of the article which projects above the level of liquid in the bath when the article is operatively disposed on said roller meansand the bath is filled with liquid to a predetermined operative level, and said electrode contact member engaging an article on said roller means to rotate the article as said conveying means moves said electrode longitudinally of said bath.

6. In an apparatus for processing and treating a tubular article in a bath, conveying means for conveying an article through the bath, an elongated electrode swingably supported on said conveying means and extending transversely of the bath for pivotal movement into an"-v out of the bath during longitudinal movement by said conveying means, article supporting rollers rotatably carried at spaced points along said electrode for rotatably supporting a tubular article with the electrode extending into the interior of the article and the rollers engagir the interior surface of the article and spacing the article from said electrode, the peripheries of said rollers being insulated from said electrode to mount the article in insulated relation to said electrode, an elongated electrode contact member extending longitudinally of the bath above said rollers and said electrode with the electrode submerged in said bath, said electrode contact member being operative to engage an exterior portion of the article which projects above the level of liquid in the bath when the article is operatively disposed on said rollers and the bath is filled with liquid to a predetermined operative level, and said electrode contact member cooperating with an article on said rollers to rotate the article as said conveying means move said electrode longitudinally of said bath, further roller means rotatably carried by said conveying means for rotation on an axis generally parallel to the axis of rotation of said rollers but spaced thereabove with the lower peripheral portion of said roller means being disposed to engage the exterior periphcry of a reduced diameter portion of the article, said roller means lower peripheral portion being spaced downwardly from the upper periphery of the article engaged by said rollers to interlock an article with a reduced diameter portion between the rollers and said roller means.

7. In an apparatus for processing and treating a tubular article in a bath, conveying means for conveying an article through the bath having a depending resilient arm, an electrode carried by said arm and supported by said arm for movement into and out of the bath during longitudinal movement of said conveying means, roller means rotatably carried by said electrode, said electrode and said roller means being adapted to receive an article thereover in telescopic relation, and an electrode contact member disposed above the position of said electrode in said bath to provide a lower camming surface adapted to contact an exterior surface of said article to tension said depending resilient arm, said resilient arm thereby being operative to urge the article into engagement with said electrode contact member.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 786,776 Potthoft Apr. 4, 1905 1,168,281 Buch Jan. 18, 1916 1,836,579 Davis Dec. 15, 1931 1,850,426 Tyrrell Mar. 22, 1932 1,895,622 Hannon Jan. 31, 1933 2,128,827 Killian Aug. 30, 1938 2,148,552 Hannon Feb. 28, 1939 2,512,643 Hannon June 27, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS 415,773 Germany July 4, 1925

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US786776 *Dec 1, 1904Apr 4, 1905Louis PotthoffElectroplating apparatus.
US1168281 *Jun 23, 1913Jan 18, 1916Safety Armorite Conduit CompanyElectroplating apparatus.
US1836579 *Apr 12, 1929Dec 15, 1931Century Zinc CompanyMethod of and apparatus for electroplating pipe
US1850426 *Jul 15, 1926Mar 22, 1932Chemical Treat Company IncProcess for electrodepositing chromium and the like
US1895622 *Mar 16, 1931Jan 31, 1933Hannon Albert HElectroprocessing machine
US2128827 *Mar 9, 1938Aug 30, 1938Killian Frank BMethod and apparatus for manufacturing thin rubber articles
US2148552 *May 12, 1934Feb 28, 1939Hannon Albert HBarrel plating machine
US2512643 *Jun 29, 1946Jun 27, 1950Albert HannonApparatus for processing workpieces in solution tanks
DE415773C *Aug 9, 1924Jul 4, 1925Atg Allg Transportanlagen GmbhFoerderkette fuer lange Gegenstaende
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2848405 *Apr 30, 1953Aug 19, 1958Natural Products CompanyApparatus for handling and conveying work
US2887447 *Oct 18, 1956May 19, 1959Lancy Leslie EElectrotreating apparatus and process
US3254005 *Jan 25, 1962May 31, 1966Porter Co Inc H KProtective coating for ferrous metal conduit
US3429787 *Jun 15, 1964Feb 25, 1969Benteler Werke AgProcess and apparatus for electrolytically treating metal tubes
US5865979 *Dec 4, 1996Feb 2, 1999Thomas & Betts CorporationGround rod and apparatus and method for electroplating
US6979248May 7, 2002Dec 27, 2005Applied Materials, Inc.Conductive polishing article for electrochemical mechanical polishing
US6988942Jul 20, 2004Jan 24, 2006Applied Materials Inc.Conductive polishing article for electrochemical mechanical polishing
US6991528Jun 6, 2003Jan 31, 2006Applied Materials, Inc.Conductive polishing article for electrochemical mechanical polishing
US7014538Mar 5, 2003Mar 21, 2006Applied Materials, Inc.Article for polishing semiconductor substrates
US7029365Dec 23, 2003Apr 18, 2006Applied Materials Inc.Pad assembly for electrochemical mechanical processing
US7059948Dec 20, 2001Jun 13, 2006Applied MaterialsArticles for polishing semiconductor substrates
US7077721Dec 3, 2003Jul 18, 2006Applied Materials, Inc.Pad assembly for electrochemical mechanical processing
US7084064Sep 14, 2004Aug 1, 2006Applied Materials, Inc.Full sequence metal and barrier layer electrochemical mechanical processing
US7125477Aug 2, 2002Oct 24, 2006Applied Materials, Inc.Contacts for electrochemical processing
US7137868Mar 6, 2006Nov 21, 2006Applied Materials, Inc.Pad assembly for electrochemical mechanical processing
US7137879Mar 30, 2006Nov 21, 2006Applied Materials, Inc.Conductive polishing article for electrochemical mechanical polishing
US7207878Jan 8, 2005Apr 24, 2007Applied Materials, Inc.Conductive polishing article for electrochemical mechanical polishing
US7278911Aug 30, 2005Oct 9, 2007Applied Materials, Inc.Conductive polishing article for electrochemical mechanical polishing
US7285036Nov 21, 2006Oct 23, 2007Applied Materials, Inc.Pad assembly for electrochemical mechanical polishing
US7303462Mar 22, 2005Dec 4, 2007Applied Materials, Inc.Edge bead removal by an electro polishing process
US7303662Aug 2, 2002Dec 4, 2007Applied Materials, Inc.Contacts for electrochemical processing
US7311592Nov 2, 2006Dec 25, 2007Applied Materials, Inc.Conductive polishing article for electrochemical mechanical polishing
US7344431Jul 18, 2006Mar 18, 2008Applied Materials, Inc.Pad assembly for electrochemical mechanical processing
US7344432Oct 31, 2006Mar 18, 2008Applied Materials, Inc.Conductive pad with ion exchange membrane for electrochemical mechanical polishing
US7374644Jun 26, 2003May 20, 2008Applied Materials, Inc.Conductive polishing article for electrochemical mechanical polishing
US7427340Apr 8, 2005Sep 23, 2008Applied Materials, Inc.Conductive pad
US7446041Jun 21, 2006Nov 4, 2008Applied Materials, Inc.Full sequence metal and barrier layer electrochemical mechanical processing
US7520968Oct 4, 2005Apr 21, 2009Applied Materials, Inc.Conductive pad design modification for better wafer-pad contact
US7569134Jun 14, 2006Aug 4, 2009Applied Materials, Inc.Contacts for electrochemical processing
US7670468Sep 15, 2005Mar 2, 2010Applied Materials, Inc.Contact assembly and method for electrochemical mechanical processing
US7678245Jun 30, 2004Mar 16, 2010Applied Materials, Inc.Method and apparatus for electrochemical mechanical processing
Classifications
U.S. Classification204/203, 205/143, 204/297.1, 205/151, 204/212, 204/297.9, 204/297.14
International ClassificationB65G49/00, B65G49/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65G49/0463
European ClassificationB65G49/04B4A4A4