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Publication numberUS2712143 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1955
Filing dateJul 31, 1951
Publication numberUS 2712143 A, US 2712143A, US-A-2712143, US2712143 A, US2712143A
InventorsJoseph Palma
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Palma
US 2712143 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 5, 1955 J. PALMA, JR., ET AL 2,712,143

SPONGE CLEANER AND WRINGER Filed July 51 1951 A TTORNEYS.

United States Patent SPONGE CLEANER AND Vi RINGER Joseph Palma, .l'r., Berwyn, and James G. Knapp, Lombard, 111., assignors, by mesne assignments, to American-Marietta Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application July 31, 1951, Serial No. 239,582

2 Claims. (Cl. 15-119 This invention relates to a sponge cleaner and wringer.

An object of the invention is to provide a structure of simple and sturdy construction effective for supporting a sponge for cleaning uses while providing means for wringing the sponge. A further object is to provide a sponge and wringer therefor with the wringer normally in retracted and non-obstructing position but being rendered operative for quick wringing of the sponge. A further object is to provide a frusto-conical wringer in combination with a sponge for effectively wringing the sponge, means being provided for freeing the major portion of the sponge from the wringer when the sponge is to be used for cleaning purposes. Other specific objects and advantages will appear asithe specification proceeds.

The invention is shown in an illustrative embodiment by the accompanying drawing, in which- Figure 1 is a perspective view of a sponge cleaner device embodying our invention; Fig. 2, a longitudinal sectional view; Fig. 3, a view similar to Fig. 2 but showing the cone wringer in advanced position; and Fig. 4, a transverse sectional view of the cone wringer and support therefor taken on the line 4--4 of Fig. 2.

In the illustration given, designates a sponge, which may be a natural or artificial sponge, and which may be of any desired shape. In the illustration given, the sponge 10 is of a generally cylindrical shape but is preferably slightly tapered toward its rear wall. Within the sponge is embedded a retainer plate 11 threadably receiving the forward end of a rod 12. The rod 12 extends through a hollow handle 13. The rear end portion of the rod 12 is preferably threaded to engage a threaded recess in the endpiece 14, and the endpiece 14 is provided with a tongue portion 15 received within a corresponding recess in the end of handle 13.

The forward end of handle 13 is provided with a square shank 16 slideably receiving a cup or frusto-conicallyshaped wringer 17 The cone wringer has a rearwall provided with a square opening snugly receiving the square shank 16 of handle 13. The cone or cup wringer 17 is preferably provided with perforations 18, through which liquid wrung from the sponge may be discharged.

Operation In the operation of the device, the cone or cup wringer 17 is normally in the retracted position shown in Fig. 2 and the forward end of the sponge 10 is thus free for contact with dishes or other objects or surfaces to be cleaned. When it is desired to wring the sponge, the user simply presses forwardly the cup wringer 17 to the position shown in Fig. 3. The sponge is compressed and the liquid therein isvdischarged through the forward end of the sponge and also laterally through the openings 18 in the wringer 17. Upon release of the wringer cup, the resiliency of the sponge tends to move the cup automatically back to the position shown in Fig. 2.

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With the construction shown, it is also possible to operate the wringer while leaving the cup 17 in the retracted position shown in Fig. 2. By drawing the endpiece 14 rearwardly, the retainer plate 11 is effective in drawing the sponge rearwardly and within the cone cup,17, thus compressing the sponge and causing a discharge of liquid therefrom.

The structure may be simplified by securing the retainer plate 11 'within the sponge 10 to the rod 12 and then fixedly securing the rod to the handle 13. Then, if desired, the knob 14 and threaded rear end portion (or greater portion) of the rod may be eliminated. With this construction, the wringer cup 17 is effective as described first above, in compressing the sponge as the cup is moved forward and releasing the sponge for cleaning as the cup reaches its rearrnost position. If a cone-shaped cup is employed, the cup is effective not only in pressing the sponge longitudinally against plate 11, but also the cone sides of the cup themselves tend to effect an inward compression and wringing of the sponge body.

While in the foregoing specification, we have set forth a specific structure in considerable detail for the purpose of illustrating an embodiment of the invention, it will be understood that such details of structure may be varied widely by thoseskilled in the art without departing from the spirit of our invention.

We claim:

1. A sponge cleaner and wringer, comprising a sponge, a frusto-conically shaped wringer providing an end wall at the smaller diameter thereof and receiving the rear portion of said sponge and being substantially filled thereby, the side walls of said wringer being perforated, a handle support for said sponge having a portion thereof slidably mounted in the end wall of said wringer and provided with a longitudinally-extending passage therethrough, a retainer plate embedded in the forward portion of said sponge, a rod secured to said retainer plate and being slidably received within said passage and extending therethrough, and a draw endpiece secured to the rear end of said rod, said retainer plate and said wringer being movable with respect to each other to effect a compression of said sponge by movement of either said wringer or said draw endpiece.

2. A sponge cleaner and wringer, comprising a sponge, a generally frusto-conically shaped wringer providing an end wall at the smaller diameter thereof and receiving the rear portion of said sponge and being substantially filled thereby at least during the wringing of the sponge, the side walls of said wringer being perforated, a handle support for said sponge having a portion thereof slidably mounted in the end wall of said wringer, a retainer plate embedded in the forward portion of said sponge, a rod secured to said retainer plate and being slidably carried by said handle, and means for moving said rod to compress said sponge, said retainer plate and said wringer being movable with respect to each other to effect a compression of said sponge by movement of either said wringer or said rod.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 363,674 Pinel May 24, 1887 719,383 Shych Jan. 27, 1903 1,100,367 Gambill June 16, 1914 FOREIGN PATENTS 13,540 Great Britain June 15, 1904 593,452 Great Britain Oct. 16, 1947

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US363674 *May 24, 1887Pffiel brothersWalter p
US719383 *May 7, 1902Jan 27, 1903Charles S ShychCombined mop and wringer.
US1100367 *May 29, 1913Jun 16, 1914Mary I GambillSanitary cleaner for bed-springs.
GB593452A * Title not available
GB190413540A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3096534 *Oct 11, 1961Jul 9, 1963Jones Clifford EApplicator for liquid weed-killer
US5675857 *Jul 5, 1996Oct 14, 1997Hirse; GernotMop with a water-removal device
US6926678 *Sep 27, 1996Aug 9, 2005Avitar, Inc.Sample collection and delivery device
US8376982 *Feb 19, 2013American Bio Medica CorporationExtraction method and apparatus for high-sensitivity body fluid testing device
US20100172797 *Mar 16, 2010Jul 8, 2010Martin GouldExtraction method and apparatus for high-sensitivity body fluid testing device
US20130104328 *Oct 31, 2012May 2, 2013Quickie Manufacturing CorporationCleaning implement
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/119.2, 15/244.1
International ClassificationA47L1/06, A47L1/00, A47L13/10, A47L17/00, A47L13/14
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/14, A47L1/06, A47L17/00
European ClassificationA47L1/06, A47L13/14, A47L17/00