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Publication numberUS2712191 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1955
Filing dateMar 11, 1953
Priority dateMar 11, 1953
Publication numberUS 2712191 A, US 2712191A, US-A-2712191, US2712191 A, US2712191A
InventorsGeorge C Hillenbrand
Original AssigneeBatesville Casket Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Attachment device
US 2712191 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 5, 1955 6. c. HILLENBRAND ATTACHMENT DEVICE Fi'led March 11, 1953 INVENTOR.

A T ORNE Y5 United States Patent" O ATTACHIVIENT DEVICE 3 George C. Hillenbrand,-.B'atesville, Ind., assignor-to The Batesville Casket Company, Batesville, Ind., a corporation of Indiana Application Marchll, 1953,-Serial No. 341,787 7 Claims. (CI. 41-12) This invention relates to a device for attaching a crucifix to a metal casket and is also susceptible to being used for analogous purposes. The problem which the device of this invention was'designed tosolve is that of attaching a crucifix to a metal casket ofthe sealer type; that is, a casket which is-hermetically sealed by gasketing or the like in order to -provide better'protection of the body after interment} A crucifix maygbe attached to an ordinary metal casket by any desired means suc'has metal screws 'orn'uts and bolts, but if' such'attachment devices are'usedwith a sealer casket then the seal is ruined. Further, a crucifix often is removed'from the casketbefo're it is lowered into the grave so if 'theatta'chment is sufficiently firm to satisfy the requirements of the-transportationof the casket then it maybe difiicult to detach the cr'ucifix at the end of the ceremony. While manydevices have been suggestedor tried for attaching a crucifix" to a casket, none has been entirely satisfactory, particularly with a sealer type of casket.-

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a front elevational viewof a crucifix having a pair of the attachment devices of the present invention'afiixed to its underside. In-th'e view therepresentation of the body of Christ is-not shown.-

Figure 2 is a side elevational view of the crucifix illustrated in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 33 in Figure l.

Figure 4 is a perspective view showing the underside of an attachment device embodying the principles of the present invention.

Figure 5 is a longitudinal cross sectional view thereof.

Figure 6 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 6-6 in Figure 5.

Figure 7 is a diagrammatic view, in perspective, showing a modified form of the attachment device being used to affix a floral piece to the top of a casket.

Figure 8 is a cross sectional view similar to Figure 6 of the attachment device illustrated in Figure 7.

Figure 9 is a cross sectional view similar to Figure 5 illustrating the manner in which the prongs utilized for aflixing floral pieces are installed in the attachment device.

The attachment device of this invention comprises a block of rubber 10 in which there is a substantially semicircular recess 11 which holds a semicircular permanent magnet 12. The recess is open at both ends at one face of the block which is provided with serrations or treading 13 to provide friction between the device and the surface upon which it is placed. Preferably, the ends of the magnet are slightly countersunk in relation to the treading so that when the device is attached to a metal surface the treading is drawn into tight engage ment with the metal surface which supplements the fixation established by the magnetic pull.

In Figures 1-3, two rubber blocks 10 are shown mounted in the back of a crucifix 14, the thickness of each Patented July 5, 1955 crucifix before the casket is lowered. The casket'is not marred by the presence of any-attaching means and if a sealer casket, this function is not impaired. Further, it is not necessary to modify-caskets to provide-attach mentmeans and the same typeof casket'canbe used regardless of whether'the ceremony re'quires'the-useof the crucifix or not. r

More specifically, as will beseenfrom"-Figure 5} the recess in the rubber block preferably is formed'to re-' ceive' the semicircular magnet snugly. The recess'is' closed bya web '16 in the instanc shown, the block is longer than it is wide and the-'openingsinto -the reces's disposed transversely thereofi Also, in the instance shown, the two end portions only of the block-are ro: videdwith serrations or treads. These serrationsja're disposed slightly outwardly with respect to the fl'atfaces 17 or pole ends of the magnet. Tl1us, when the block,

is seated against a magnetically responsive surface, the

serrations are first engaged! The thin web of rubber;

having an appreciable amount of give toit, permits the semicircular magnet'to spring outwardly to bringthe flat pole ends thereof into contact with the'casketor other responsive surface. Thespiinginessof thew'eb, therefore, permits the magnet to seat; pulling the serrated faceof the rubber block into tight'conta'ct with the sur face-upon which it rests;

It is a well known phenomenon that a magnet, when placed against a magnetically responsive surface," can be slid-"along the surfacemo're easily than it can be with drawing straight away from suchsurfac'e; -The serrated face of the blockthus resists the'forces'which tend to slide the block and the magnet itself resists forces which tend to pull the block directly away from the metallic surface. The combination of the two, therefore, provide a surprisingly strong anchor for the crucifix or other object.

One of the advantages of the semicircular shape of the recess is the ease with which the rubber block and the magnet may be assembled. As will be seen from Figure 5, the semicircular magnet is simply slipped into the recess. Once in place, the friction between the rubber block and the magnet is suflicient to hold the two parts together.

The device in question may be utilized as disclosed in Figure 7 to provide means for attaching flowers to the casket. In this modification the rubber block 10 has the semicircular magnet 12 imbedded in it with its poles exposed at one face of the block as described above. However, in this modification wire prongs 18 protrude from the face of the block opposite to the face bearing the treads and these may be used for attachment of floral pieces, such as those indicated at 19. The prongs may comprise a piece of wire which is bent into a generally U-shape. The base 20 of the U may be configurated to provide a flat foot portion and the respective ends of the wire cut at an angle to provide points. Figure 9 shows how the prongs may be inserted during assembly. Before the magnet is put, in place, the prongs are forced through the top or back of the rubber block from the recess. The prongs are then pulled outwardly until the foot portion rests against the bottom of the recess. The semicircular magnet may then be inserted, the magnet serving to hold the prongs in place.

These attachment devices may also be used for any purpose which involves analogous problems.

Having described my invention, I claim:

l. A crucifix adapted to be used on metal caskets, said crucifix comprising a cross having an ornamental front'face and a hollow back, a rubber block mounted within the hollow back and attached thereto, a semicircular recess in said rubber block, the recess having openings accessible at the back of the block, a semicircular permanent magnet in said recess, said magnet having the faces of its poles exposed to the back of the block, and a tread on the back of the block adapted to augment frictional engagement between the block and the metal surface of the casket.

2. A crucifix adapted to be used on metal caskets, said crucifix comprising a cross having an ornamental front face and a hollow back, a rubber block mounted within the hollow back and adhesively attached thereto, a semicircular recess in said rubber block having openings accessible at the back of the block, a semicircular permanent magnet residing in said recess, said magnet having the faces of its poles exposed to the back of the block, and a tread on the back of the block, said tread extending slightly outwardly beyond said pole faces to provide frictional engagement between the block and the metal surface of the casket.

- 3. A crucifix adapted to be used on metal caskets, a

pair of rubber blocks mounted within the back of said crucifix, a semicircular recess in each of said rubber blocks, each recess having openings accessible at the back of the block, a semicircular permanent magnet in said recess, and said magnet having the faces of its poles exposed to the back of the block.

4. A crucifix adapted to be used on metal caskets, said crucifix comprising a cross having an ornamental front face and a hollow back, a pair of rubber blocks mounted within the hollow back at spaced points and attached thereto, a semicircular recess in each of said rubber blocks, each recess having openings accessible at the back of the block, a semicircular permanent magnet residing in each recess, each magnet having the respective faces of its poles exposed at the openings at the back of the block, and each block being serrated to provide treads at the back thereof, said treads extending slightly outwardly beyond said pole faces to provide frictional engagement between the block and the metal surface of the casket to augment the holding force of the magnet.

5. Means for attaching an object to a magnetically responsive metal surface, said means comprising a rubber block attached to said object, a semicircular recess in said rubber block having openings accessible at one face of said block, a semicircular permanent magnet residing in said recess, said magnet having the respective faces of its poles exposed at the openings in said face, and said face being serrated to provide treads engageable with said metal surface to augment the holding force of said magnet.

6. An attachment device of the type set forth in claim 5 in which means are provided for attaching the block to an object comprises a U-shaped element having a pair of upright arms and a connecting foot portion, said arms piercing the block and extending upwardly therefrom opposite to the face thereof provided with treads with the connecting foot portion residing inside of said recess and held therein by said magnet.

7. Means for attaching an object to a magnetically responsive metal surface, said means comprising a rubber block, a semicircular recess formed in said block, a semicircular permanent magnet residing in said recess and having its respective pole ends exposed at one face of said block, a web of rubber formed as an integral part of said block and disposed between the respective pole ends of said magnet to resiliently hold saidmagnet within said recess, and the face of said block adjacent said poles being serrated to provide treads, said treads extending outwardly from said face of the block slightly beyond said pole ends.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1395982 *Mar 7, 1921Nov 1, 1921Gee Frederick SamuelDisplay device
US1624741 *Dec 10, 1926Apr 12, 1927Louis A LeppkeDisplay device
US2217514 *Mar 1, 1938Oct 8, 1940Dorsey Spencer HDish
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3025624 *Apr 6, 1960Mar 20, 1962Merit CompanyCasket hardware
US3115434 *Jun 29, 1960Dec 24, 1963Springfield Metallic Casket CoMagnetically attached crucifix for caskets
US3131897 *Jan 25, 1960May 5, 1964Long John RFloral display holder
US3164352 *Sep 25, 1961Jan 5, 1965Weaver JoanFlower valance
US3235427 *Oct 27, 1961Feb 15, 1966Harold E KoritzProcess for magnetically attaching wall paper
US3336697 *Jul 8, 1965Aug 22, 1967Daco Products IncFlower holder
US3416195 *May 31, 1967Dec 17, 1968Theodore H. BorthwickFloral corsage and fastener
US3451599 *Aug 23, 1967Jun 24, 1969Bickner Clarence TApparatus for making ornamental bows
US3624799 *Oct 9, 1969Nov 30, 1971Wernicke & Co FaDevice for the detachable fastening of the glass mount of glass frames on a worktable
US5678289 *Jan 4, 1996Oct 21, 1997Batesville Casket Company, Inc.Burial casket with music media storage and display and wherein casket design theme corresponds to music theme
US5732451 *Mar 26, 1997Mar 31, 1998Mars; Mary KayMagnetic attachment device
US7591052 *Nov 10, 2007Sep 22, 2009Batesville Services, Inc.Quick change casket ornament attachment mechanism
US8220119Oct 23, 2009Jul 17, 2012Batesville Services, Inc.Memorialization casket and method
US8387219 *Apr 19, 2011Mar 5, 2013Batesville Services, Inc.Casket ornament attachment mechanism
US8567023Mar 28, 2012Oct 29, 2013Batesville Services, Inc.Memorialization casket and method
US8756774 *Jul 23, 2013Jun 24, 2014Batesville Services, IncCasket and ornament therefore
US20050155196 *Jan 16, 2004Jul 21, 2005Paul HolzmanCasket with themed cap insert
US20060048353 *Jun 20, 2005Mar 9, 2006Brinneman Larry AHorizontal casket memorabilia shelf
US20090119893 *Nov 10, 2007May 14, 2009Batesville Services, Inc.Quick change casket ornament attachment mechanism
US20100299895 *Dec 2, 2010Batesville Services, Inc.Memorialization Casket And Method
US20120266423 *Oct 25, 2012Batesville Services, Inc.Casket ornament attachment mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/3, 40/584, 24/303, 428/900, 248/500, 27/1
International ClassificationA61G17/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61G17/04, Y10S428/90, A61G2017/045
European ClassificationA61G17/04