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Publication numberUS2712326 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1955
Filing dateSep 11, 1952
Priority dateSep 11, 1952
Publication numberUS 2712326 A, US 2712326A, US-A-2712326, US2712326 A, US2712326A
InventorsAlfred Yurdin
Original AssigneeAlfred Yurdin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tank patch holder
US 2712326 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 5, 1955 A. YURDlN TANK PATCH; HOLDER Filed Sept. 311, 1952 ilnited States Patent 2,712,326 TANK PATCH HOLDER Alfred Yurdin, Newark, N. J. Application September 11, 1952, Serial No. 308,964 Claims. (Cl. 138-99) This invention relates to patches for tanks or other vessels that contain liquid. It is a common experience, even with oil tanks, to have rust holes form in the wall of the tank, particularly the bottom wall. In oil tanks the accumulation of water within the tank, which sinks to the bottom, causes the rusting. In water tanks, the rusting is likely to occur at any location on the tank.

It is an object of this invention to provide an improved installed, and the oil then has to be trans new tank.

Another object of the invention is to provide a patch which will cover a substantial area of a tank or other merous small holes in the same general area.

One of the difiiculties encountered in the application of large patches to tanks is that piping, supporting brackets or legs and other connections often make it impossible tions and with tanks of any size and shape.

Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will appear or be pointed out as the description proceeds.

In the drawing, forming a part hereof, in which like reference characters indicate corresponding parts in all the views:

Figure 1 is a sectional view through a cylindrical tank to which has been applied one of the patches of this invention,

Figure 2 is a greatly enlarged rear view of the patch, shown in Figure 1, before it is applied to the tank,

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 2,

Figure 4 is an enlarged detailed view of the tensioner used to connect the opposite ends of the strap in Figure 1, and

ing a strap 15 which is preferably a thin strip of metal having relatively high tensile strength. The opposite ends of the strap 15 are connected with a clamp or tensioning element 17 which is operated to pull the ends of the strap together so as to hold the patch 13 in firm contact with the poro s region of the tank.

sheet steel, but can be made of other materials. A soft, resilient facing 21 is adhesively secured to the backing plate 20, and the facing 21 is many times as thick as the backing plate 20. Neoprene is a particularly satisfactory material for the facing 21, but other liquid-proof facing materials can be used.

Two strap holders 23 are connected to the backing plate 20 at spaced locations intermediate the ends of the backing plate.

of the invention.

Each of these strap holders 23 is connected to the backing plate by a rivet 24 and it is a feature of the invention that the rivets are loose enough to permit the brackets 26 and 27 closely together with resulting increase in the tension of the strap 15 around the tank. Loosening The construction of the invention, which enables the strap to obtain a pull having a substantial component normal to the surface of the tank, is particularly important in adapting the invention for tanks of different curvature, and even for tanks which have portions of their walls ilat. One common type of oil tank has curved top and bottom walls with straight side walls between them. The invention can be applied to such tanks, including the fiat sides; and when applied to a flat side the strap 15 pulls downwardly at an angle from the opposite edges of the backing plate and forms straight runs tangent to the curved walls of the tank at the ends of the flat side.

Figures 5, 6 and 7 show various ways in which the patch can be applied to tanks in which the long dimension of the porous area may extend either longitudinally or circumferentially, and in which pipes may interfere with the locating of the strap around the portion of the tank which has the leak. Figure shows the patch 13 with its long dimension extending circumferentially and with the patch held by a single strap 15, which extends around the tank along a course that lies in a plane normal to the tank axis.

Figure 6 shows the patch 13 applied to a porous area which has its greatest extent in a direction lengthwise of the tank, and under circumstances in which a pipe 38 interferes with the placing of the straps. Since the patch 13 extends longitudinally along the tank, two straps 15 are used. These straps are placed at an angle to a plane normal to the tank axis so as to pass on opposite sides of the pipe 38. The strap holders 23 are turned into positions to accommodate the direction in which the straps 15 extend.

Figure 7 shows another situation in which the strap holders 23 have to be turned at an angle to the long dimension of the patch 13. in the installation illustrated in this figure, the greatest extent of the porous area is at an acute angle to the length of the tank; but the straps 15' can be placed so that they extend in directions which lie in parallel planes normal to the tank axis.

From the examples illustrated in Figures 57, it will be apparent that the patch 1.3 can be located with any orientation on the tank 10, and at any location around the circumference of the tank; and that it can be held against the tank by one or more straps 15 in spite of obstructions in the normal path which the straps 15 would follow.

The preferred embodiment of the invention has been illustrated and described but changes and modifications can be made and some features can be used in different combinations Without departing from the invention as defined in the claims.

I claim for my invention:

1. A tank patch for covering side of a tank, which region is of greater extent, either axially or longitudinally of the tank, than the width of the patch, said patch comprising a relatively stifi, flexible backing plate of greater length than width, a soft, resilient facing on one side of the backing plate and substantially coextensive therewith, strap holders on the other side of the backing plate and intermediate the ends of the backing plate, the strap holder having channels for straps and being spaced from one another in the direction of the length of the backing plate, a pivot connection securing each of the strap holders to the patch and about which the strap holders are rotatable to turn them angularly from positions in which the channels are in alignment with one another, for holding a single strap, to positions in which the channels are parallel to one another or at various angles to one another for holding two straps that straddle a pipe extending from the side of the tank and for holding the patch with its length extending in various directions according to the direction of the greatest extent of the leakage region, at least one flexible strap for fastening across the backing plate to hold the patch in position on the tank, and a tensioner connecting a leakage region in the comprising a single 4 the opposite ends of the strap for tightening the strap around the tank.

2. A tank patch for covering a leakage region in the side of a tank, which region is of greater extent, either axially or longitudinally of the tank, than the width of the patch, said patch including a relatively stiff, flexible backing plate which is of greater length than width and normally flat but bendable in any direction to accommodate the curvature of tanks of different shape and different radius, a soft, resilient facing secured to the front of the plate and substantially coextensive therewith, at least one thin, flexible strap for attaching the plate to the tank, strap holders on the back of the plate and spaced from one another in the direction of the length of the plate, the strap holders comprising channels through which the strap passes with the sides of the channels preventing transverse displacement of the strap in the holders, fastening means attaching the strap holders to the backing plate, the fastening means for each holder pivoted connection about which the strap holder is angularly movable to turn it from a position in which the channel is in alignment with the channel of the other strap holder and into various angular positions with respect to the length of the backing plate, a tensioner connecting the opposite ends of the strap for tightening the strap on a tank.

3. The tank patch described in claim 2 characterized by strap holders which comprise undercut channels having a maximum inside width substantially equal to the width of the strap so as to prevent any substantial transverse movement of the patch with respect to one or more straps which are passed through the strap holders.

4. A tank patch for covering a leakage region in the side of a tank, which region is of greater extent, either axially or longitudinally of the tank, than the width of the patch, said patch comprising a relatively stiff, flexible backing plate, which is normally flat but bendable equally in all directions to accommodate tanks of different contour and different radius of curvature, and to accommodate itself to location at different angles to the axial extent of the tank surface, a soft, resilient, liquid-proof, facing material having a thickness many times as great as that of the backing plate, the facing material being substantially coextensive with the backing plate, a plurality of strap holders connected to the backing plate at spaced locations intermediate the end and side edges of the backing plate, the strap holders having undercut channels and being connected to the backing plate by pivoted connections on which the respective strap holders are rotatable about axes normal to the backing plate from positions in which the channels of the strap holders are in alignment with one another, for holding a single strap, to positions in which the channels are parallel to one another or at various angles to one another for holding two straps that straddle a pipe extending from a side of the tank and for holding the patch with its length extending in various directions according to the direction of greatest extent of the leakage region, a plurality of thin, flexible straps, one for each strap holder, the width of the straps being substantially equal to that of the undercut channels, a tensioner for each strap, the tensioner having two brackets connected by a threaded fastening by which the brackets canbe pulled closely together, each of the brackets having a slot with a side edge around which one end of the strap is snubbed and the end portion of the strap being turned back along the other portion of the strap leading to the bracket, and a clip holding the turned back portion of the strap and said other portion together immediately behind the slot edge around which the strap is snubbed.

5. A tank patch for covering a leakage region in the side of a tank, which region is axially or longitudinally of the tank, than the width of the patch, said patch having a back face, a plurality of strap holders spaced from one another in the direction of the of greater extent, either length of the back face and located intermediate the References Cited in the file of this patent edges of the back face, and fastening means pivotally UNITED STATES PATENTS connecting each of the strap holders to the patch, the

strap holders being movable about the fastening means Z 1905 from positions in which the longitudinal axes of the 5 1384566 Framer Sept strap holders are in alignment with one another to posi- 2504881 Russell 1930 tions in which said axes are parallel to one another or 2586640 Furman 1952 at various angles to one another for attaching the patch FOREIGN PATENTS to the tank under diiferent conditions including that Where 372 079 France Feb 9 1907 the two straps straddle a pipe extending from a side of 10 648581 Great igg Jan 1951 the tank, and conditions where the patch has its length

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US785737 *Sep 3, 1904Mar 28, 1905Lloyd JonesDevice for stopping leaks.
US1684666 *Jun 1, 1925Sep 18, 1928Albert Frazier CharlesPipe band
US2504881 *Mar 24, 1947Apr 18, 1950Russell Arthur HLeak clamp
US2586640 *Jun 25, 1947Feb 19, 1952Furman Eugene CLeak sealing device
FR372079A * Title not available
GB648581A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3487857 *Sep 8, 1967Jan 6, 1970Pike Corp Of AmericaGas clamp
US3574256 *May 27, 1968Apr 13, 1971Dow Chemical CoMethod of repairing a glass-coated surface
US4351098 *Jun 11, 1980Sep 28, 1982Hanna Glenn WMethod for repairing and reinforcing cast iron molds
US5247967 *Aug 29, 1991Sep 28, 1993Bourque Robert BPipe repair apparatus
US5706862 *Oct 31, 1996Jan 13, 1998Meinerding, Sr.; Wesley C.For repairing a leak in a pipe
Classifications
U.S. Classification138/99, 29/402.9, 24/279
International ClassificationF16L55/172, B65D90/00, F16L55/16, F16L3/12
Cooperative ClassificationF16L55/172, B65D90/00, F16L3/12
European ClassificationB65D90/00, F16L3/12, F16L55/172