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Publication numberUS2713279 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 19, 1955
Filing dateJan 21, 1953
Priority dateJan 21, 1953
Publication numberUS 2713279 A, US 2713279A, US-A-2713279, US2713279 A, US2713279A
InventorsHarris Carl H
Original AssigneeSherman Mfg Co H B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lug staking tool
US 2713279 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Filed Jan. 21, 1953 g .Q \w

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mm J L States Patent LUG srAmNo TOOL *Carl Harris, Battle Creek, Mich assignor to H. B. Shermm Manufacturing (30., Battle Creek, liich, a corporation of Michigan Appiication Sanitary 21, 1953, Serial No. 332,244

2 Claims. (Ci. S115) My present invention relates generally to lug staking tool, and, more specifically, is directed to a tool for staking an electrical conducting lug to the end of a cable" or the like.

The primary disadvantage, which I have found in existing lug staking tools, resides in the fact that each tool is adapted to accommodate only a single size lug. As a result, where it becomes necessary to stake lugs of varying diameters, a number of staking tools must be maintained on hand, with each such staking tool being set to accommodate a different size lug. This arrangement is undesirable because valuable storage space is taken up by the several staking tools, there is the added expense of the cost and maintenance of the several staking tools, and time is consumed by an operator when switching from one tool to another.

it is an object of my present invention to provide a lug staking tool wherein lugs of varying diameters may be accommodated.

It is another object of my present invention to provide a lug staking tool of the character noted wherein manual adjustment of the tool may be made rapidly and easily for accommodating lugs of varying diameters.

It is a further object of my present invention to provide a lug staking tool, as noted, which is inexpensive to manufacture and maintain.

In the accomplishment of the foregoing obiectsd provide a lug staking tool which comprises a bed having a piston mounted therein for reciprocal movement. The bed also carries a lug receiving nest with which is associated means for locating the nest in one of a plurality of axial positions whereby the distance between the piston and the nest may be varied for accommodating lugs of various diameters. h iore specifically, the nest is provided with a pair of indexing blades which are normally spring biased toward one pair of a plurality of steps formed in an indexing barrel. The steps are of varying axial depths. Adjustment in the axial position of the nest is accomplished by manuallywithdrawing the indexing blades from the steps of the barrel, revolving the barrel until the pair of steps of the desired depth are aligned with the blades, and then releasing the nest permitting the blades to engage the selected steps thus setting the nest in a predetermined axial position. By virtue of this construction, a single staking tool accommodates a wide range of lugs of varying diameters.

A primary feature of my present invention resides in the novel form of means for effecting reciprocal movement of the piston. The actuating means comprises a first arm member pivotally mounted to the tool bed and a second arm member pivotally mounted to the first arm member at a point spaced from the pivotal mounting of the first arm member to the tool bed. The second arm member is also pivotally mounted to the piston at a point spaced from the pivotal mounting of the second arm member to the first arm member. The arm members are manually movable toward and away from each other for effecting movement of the piston toward and away from the lug receiving nest whereby a lug may be staked or crimped 2,7133% i atented July 19, 1955 between the piston and the nest. The arrangement of the pivotal mountings of the arm members provides for a toggle form of action which snaps the piston into full engagement with a lug lying in the lug receiving nest thus effecting a secure staking.

Now, in order to acquaint those skilled in the art with the manner of constructing and using lug staking tools in accordance with the principles of my present invention, I shall describe in connection with the accompanying drawing, a preferred embodiment of my present invention.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of the lug staking tool of my present invention with a portion being broken away for the sake of clarity;

Figure 2 is a plan view of the lug staking tool of Figure 1; and

Figure 3 is an enlarged sectional view of the lug staking tool, taken along the line 33 of Figure 1, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows.

Referring now to the drawing, there is indicated generally by the reference numeral 10 the bed of the lug staking tool of my present invention. The bed 10 may be held in the hand of an operator or may be mounted to a bench or the like by means of a bolt inserted through the bed opening 11. The tool bed 19 has a bight portion 12 and a pair of parallel spaced apart leg portions 13 and 14 projecting at right angles therefrom.

Mounted in the leg portion 13 for reciprocal movement, parallel to the bight portion 12 of the tool bed 19, is a cylindrical piston 15 which has a stepped, tapered nose portion 16 that faces the leg portion 14. A cylindrical adjusting pin or plunger 17 is mounted in the leg portion 14 for reciprocal movement parallel to the bight portion 12 of the tool bed 1%. As shown in Figure 3, a counterbore 18 is formed in the leg portion 14. The counterbore 18 receives a coil spring 19 which is arranged concentrically about the plunger 17 and engages the enlarged knurled head 20 of the latter.

The end of the plunger 37 which extends toward the piston 15 is received in the central bore of a lug receiving nest member 21 having a substantially V-shaped nest portion 22. The nest member 21 is secured to the plunger 17 by means of a retaining wire or staple 23 which is disposed through transverse openings in the member 21 and in engagement with the sides of a groove 24 formed in the plunger 17. A pair of blade members 25 project axially from the lug receiving nest member 21 toward the leg portion 14 of the tool bed 10.

In the accomplishment of my present invention, I provide means for locating the nest member 21 in one of a plurality of axial positions whereby the distance between the piston 15 and the nest portion 22 may be varied for accommodating lugs of various diameters. The locating means comprises a barrel 26 which is mounted on the plunger 17 intermediate of the nest member 21 and the leg portion 14 of the tool bed 10. The barrel 26 is formed with a plurality of steps 27 which are arranged about the periphery thereof. The steps 27 are of varying axial depth and are preferably milled. The steps 27, at diametrically opposite sides of the barrel 26, are of the same depth to accommodate both of the indexing blades 25. I will be recognized by those skilled in the art that the indexing blades 25 are normally biased, by means of the action of spring 19, into engagement with the steps of the barrel 26. Suitable indicia may be imprinted on the barrel 26 for indicating the sizes of lugs that will be accommodated at the various settings of the nest member 21.

If it is desired to change the distance between the piston 15 and nest portion 22, the head 20 of the plunger 17 is pushed to the left, as viewed in the drawing, until the ice blades 25 are withdrawn from the steps 27. At this point, the indexing barrel 26 may be rotated to align or register any pair of steps 27 of the desired depth with the blade members 25,.after which the plunger 17 may be released for permitting the blades 25 to engage the selected steps 27 thus setting the nest member 21 in a predetermined axial position. It will be readily appreciated that the axial position of the nest member 21 may be changed rapidly and easily for accommodating lugs of varying diameters.

I shall now describe the force transmitting means which is employed for reciprocating the piston 15. The force transmitting means comprises a lower arm member 29 which is pivotally mounted on a pin member 30 secured in the parallel spaced apart walls 31 extending rearwardly from the leg portion 13 of the tool bed 10. An upper arm member 32 is formed with a bifurcated end 33 which is pivotally mounted on a pin member 34 that is carried by the lower arm member 29 at a point spaced from the pin member 30. The bifurcated end 33 of the upper arm member 32 is also pivotally mounted on a pin member 35 which is carried by the piston 15 at a point spaced from the pin member 34. The ends of the pin members 34 and 35 terminate at the inner surfaces of the tool bed walls 31.

In the operation ofthe afore-described force transmitting means, the arm members 29 and 32 are spread apart which draws the piston 15 to the left as viewed in the drawing. The nest member 21 is adjusted in the manner described in detail hereinbefore and then an electrical conducting lug, which is, for example, to be staked or crimped to a cable, is inserted over the end of the cable and laid in the nest portion 22. The arm members 29 and 32 are then squeezed together which action urges the piston 15 toward the lug for staking the latter to the cable. a

The arrangement of the pivotal mountings of the arm members 29 and 32 provides for a toggle form of force transmitting action which snaps the piston 15 into full engagement with the lug lying in the nest portion 22 thus effecting a positive and secure staking. After the lug has been staked, the arm members 29 and 32 are again spread apart to permit the staked lug tobe removed from, and an unstaked lug to be inserted in, the nest portion 22. It should be noted that the above-described'steps, which are taken in crimping a lug, may be carried out quite rapidly.

Now, while I have shown and described what I believe to be a preferred embodiment of my present invention, it will be understood that various rearrangements and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

I claim:

1. A lug staking tool comprising a bed having a bight portion and a pair of parallel spaced apart leg portions projecting therefrom, a piston mounted in one of said leg portions for reciprocal movement parallel to the bight portion of said bed, a plunger mounted in the other of said leg portions for reciprocal movement parallel to the bight portion of said bed, the axes of said piston and said plunger coinciding, a lug receiving nest secured to the end of said plunger which faces said piston, means for locating said nest in one of a plurality of axial positions whereby the distance between said piston and said nest may be varied for accommodating lugs of various diameters, said means comprising a barrel mounted on said plunger intermediate said nest and said other leg portion of said bed, said barrel having steps about the periphery thereof of varying axial depth, said nest having an axially rearwardly extending blade which is adapted to be received in one of said steps in said barrel, spring means for normally biasing said blade toward said barrel, said plunger being adapted to be moved axially to withdraw said blade from said steps of said barrel after which the latter may be rotated to align'any step of the desired depth with the blade whereupon the plunger may be released for permitting the blade to engage the selected step thus setting the nest in a predetermined axial position, a pair ofarm members pivotally mounted to said bed and having connection with said piston, and said arm members being manually operable for etfecting movement of said piston tomard and away from said nest whereby a lug may be staked between said piston and said nest.

2. A lug staking tool comprising a bed, a piston mounted in said bed for reciprocal movement, a plunger mounted in said bed for aligned reciprocal movement relative to said piston, a lug receiving nest secured to the end of said plunger which faces said piston, means for locating said nest in one of a plurality of axial positions whereby the distance between said piston and said nest may be varied for accommodating lugs of various diameters, said means comprising a barrel mounted on said plunger intermediate of the ends thereof, said barrel having steps about the periphery thereof of varying axial depth, said nest having an axially rearwardly extending indexing member which is adapted to be received in one of said steps in said barrel, spring means for normally biasing said indexing member toward said barrel, said plunger being adapted to be moved axially to withdraw said indexing member from said steps of said barrel after which the latter may be rotated 'to align any step of the desired depth with the indexing member whereupon the plunger may be released for permitting the indexing member to engage the selected step thus setting the nest in a predetermined axial position, and manually operable means for effecting movement of said piston toward and away from said nest whereby a ing may be staked between said piston and said nest.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Kirk Mar. 6, 1951

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2966192 *Oct 22, 1954Dec 27, 1960Burndy CorpDeep crimping tool
US3204445 *Apr 16, 1963Sep 7, 1965Sargent & CoHand tool
US4530231 *Jul 3, 1980Jul 23, 1985Apx Group Inc.Method and apparatus for expanding tubular members
US4790173 *May 29, 1987Dec 13, 1988Amp IncorporatedShut height adjustment means in pressing apparatus
US4793385 *Mar 18, 1988Dec 27, 1988Tyton CorporationHandheld tensioning and cut-off tool
US4926685 *Sep 19, 1989May 22, 1990Shannon Sr John KAdjustable crimping tool
US5435167 *Jan 21, 1994Jul 25, 1995Cableready, Inc.Cable end compressor
US5915425 *Aug 28, 1997Jun 29, 1999Thomas & Betts CorporationCable tie installation tool
US7124787Aug 18, 2004Oct 24, 2006Hellermanntyton CorporationPneumatic cable tie installation tool
US7591451Nov 13, 2007Sep 22, 2009Hellermanntyton CorporationBundle tie tensioning clutch
US8677610 *Mar 20, 2012Mar 25, 2014Jetool Corp.Crimping tool
US20130247365 *Mar 20, 2012Sep 26, 2013Jen Kai LiuCrimping tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/31.12, 81/391, 81/363, 72/409.1
International ClassificationH01R43/042, H01R43/04
Cooperative ClassificationH01R43/042
European ClassificationH01R43/042