Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2714426 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1955
Filing dateJan 21, 1953
Priority dateJan 21, 1953
Publication numberUS 2714426 A, US 2714426A, US-A-2714426, US2714426 A, US2714426A
InventorsHarry B White
Original AssigneeHoover Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suction cleaner having a cleaning and disposable dirt storing container
US 2714426 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 2, 1955 H. B. WHITE 2,714,426 SUCTION CLEANER HAVING A CLEANING AND DISPOSABLE DIRT STORING CONTAINER Filed Jan. 21, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 I I4 59 :i /2 /3 o 24 i c 45 33 4/ A (q-n =L Fig INVENTOH.

Harry B. White BY M ATTORNEY.

Aug. 2, 1955 H. B. WHITE 2,714,426

SUCTION CLEANER HAVING A CLEANING AND DISPOSABLE DIRT STORING CONTAINER Filed Jan. 21, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.

Harry 8 Milk BY M ATTORNEY.

Aug. 2, 1955 H. B. WHITE 2,714,426

SUCTION CLEANER HAVING A CLEANING AND DISPOSABLE DIRT STORING CONTAINER Filed Jan. 21, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Fig 3 INVENTOR.

Harry B. White W/Y/ZMW ATTORNEY.

g- 1955 H. B. WHITE 2,714,426

SUCTION CLEANER HAVING A CLEANING AND DISPOSABLE DIRT STORING CONTAINER Filed Jan. 21, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. Harry B. White 4 BY /QM ATTORNEY.

United States Patent O SUCTION CLEANER HAVING A CLEANING AND DISPOSABLE DIRT STORING CONTAINER Harry B. White, Canton; Ohio; assignor to The Hoover Company, North Canton, hio, a corporation of Ohio Application January 21, 1953, Serial No. 332,145 13 Claims. (Cl.l18358) My invention relates to the art of suction cleaners and in particular. to a suction cleaner embodying a filter and a low cost disposabledirt container incorporating means for cleaning the filter periodically and for discharging dirt removed from the filter into the disposable container.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a device of the above described character in which the disposable container is subjected to a slight excess internal pressure during operation to maintainthe same in inflatedcondition.

It is a further and more particular object of-my invention to provide a device of the above described character incorporating a mechanism which automatically feeds dirt removed from the filter into the disposable container concurrently with the filter cleaning operation It is a further object of my invention to provide adevice of the above described character in which the mechanism for operating the filter cleaner and dirt removing mechanism is housed within a cleaner propellinghandle.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be come apparent as the description proceeds when takenin connection with the accompanyingdrawing, in which:

Figure l-is an elevational viewsin .section illustrating a canister type cleaner embodying: my invention;

Figure 2 is aview similar to Figure lrsh owing the ap paratus with the parts in filter cleaningsand .dirt ejecting.

position;

Figure 3 is a broken' elevational sectional view of a handle propelled type of cleaner embodying, my invention;

Figure 4isra view similarit -tor Figure 3 showing thetposition of the mechanisminrfilter cleaningrand dirt ejection. position; and

Figure S is a sectional view taken alongrthe linet5t--5t of Figure 4 andklookingtrin the direction of-ither arrows.

Referring nowto thedrawings in detail and first to Figure 1 thereof, myginvention is shown as appliedttowa canister type. cleaner comprising an outer casing; 1 having an impervious bottornwwall 2 and a, removably attachedcap plate 3 forming the' top and part tofi ithe'upper side,

wall of the machine andaprovided with a centraladepression A in the top wall thereof.

The casing 1 is providedi iwith a central partition; 5

dividing the same 1 into an upper filterscontaming-ohamber andaa lower motor fannand dirt; storagercontainer. A motor fan suctionnproducing unit 6 is mountedt inrthe casing-1 belowthe partitionS in anannular resilient ring head 9 -is-c1osed by a removable panel 1-1 to permit aocess interiorly of the casing 1. The conduit 12 is adapted to be connected to a suitable suction hosein any known or conventional manner. The inner end of the conduit 12 carries a flap valve 13 which is mounted on a pivot 14 carriedby theconduit 12. The valve 13 is biased by gravity to the full line, closedposition illustrated in Figure 1 and is adapted to be moved to the dashed line position under the influence of an air stream flowing throughthe conduit 12.

The chamber above the partition 5 houses a filter structure consisting of a lower filter part 16, preferably of textile fabric, having its lower end secured around the outer rim of a discharge funnel 17 and its upper end secured in a shallow annular channel 18 by bindingcords 1-9. It is preferable to apply a plastic or rubber coating to the portion of the filter 16 which is engaged by cords 19 and which project above the channel anchor 18 in order to protect this part of the apparatus against abrasion. The filter 16 has an opening in its side which receives the conduit 12 and is secured in air sealed relation to the conduit 12 by a clamping band 20.

The upper channel anchor member 13 is secured as by studs 22 to the rim portion of a spider frame 23 which isislidably mounted on a tube 24 which depends from the gasket 29 by an overlapping flange 39 on the anchoringmember 18.

It is apparent from the foregoing that dirt laden air discharging through the conduit 12 passes through the filters 16 and 26 which removes the dirt therefrom. The cleaned air which is passed through the filters has a free path of flow therearound in the chamber above the partition 5 and then passes through slots 32 in the partition 5 into the chamber to the left of the bulkhead 7, as viewed in Figure l, and then to the motor fan unit. After passing through the motor fan cool the motor, it discharges from the chamber to the right of the bulkhead, as viewed in Figure 1, through an elbow shaped discharge conduit 33 which passes through the partition 5 and opens through the outer wall of the casing 1. The conduit 33 also forms a connection for a flexible hose when the apparatus is utilized for blowing operation.

The funnel 17 is provided with a cylindrical discharge conduit 35 at its lower end which is adapted to telescope into the gathered mouth portion of a dirt storing and dis posing sack 36. The neck of the sack 36 is retained in air sealed relation to the conduit 35 by means of an elastic band 37. The sack 36 is preferably a low cost impervious paper container which may be thrown away when filled with dirt. The outer Wall of the casing1 is provided With an opening 38 to the chamber housing the sack 36in orderto permit ready access to the sack for replacement thereof. The opening 33 is normally closed by a closure plate 39 having a hinged mount 4-0 on the outer wall of the casing 11, The edges of the closure 39 carry a sealing gasket 41 which engages the outer wall ofthe casing l'around the opening 38 to form an air seal therebetween; The hinge 4G is preferably of the type havingna: light spring incorporated therein which biases Patented Aug..2, 1955 unit, where the air serves to the door 39 to the closed position. it is apparent, from the direction of air flow, that the pressure within the chamber containing the sack 36 is considerably below the atmospheric pressure bearing on the outside of door 39 which compresses the gasket and maintains a complete seal around this member.

The spider 23, which is slidably mounted on the hollow pedestal or tubular member 24 is biased to the upper position illustrated in Figure l by means of a spring 44 bearing on a projecting foot portion 45 on the member 24 and the central portion of the spider 23. The spring 44 biases the spider upwardly, as viewed in Figure l, which tensions the filter 16.

A rod 46 is secured to the underside of the spider 23 and depends therefrom to support a conical ram 47 at its lower end, which ram is positioned above and in alignment with the discharge conduit 35 and is connected to pass therethrough for the'purpose of feeding material in the funnel 17 through the conduit 35 into the sack 36.

A plunger 50 is slidably mounted Within the tubular member 24 and carries an operating handle 51 at its upper end. A spring 52 mounted within the member 24 biases the plunger 50 to its elevated position. The lower end of the plunger 50 is provided with a transverse slot 53 within which a pair of latch dogs 54 are pivotally mounted. The upper ends of the latch dogs 54 are biased outwardly of the plunger by a spring 55. The upper ends of the latch dogs 54 project outwardly of the member 24 through vertical slots 56 formed therein and engage over the upper part of the spider 23 in a groove 57 formed in the upper surface thereof. The lower ends of the latch dogs 54 are pointed as indicated at 58 and are adapted to engage the diagonally cut bottom portions 59 of the slots 56.

When the handle 51 is depressed to the position illustrated in Figure 2, the plunger travels downwardly in the member 24 against the bias of spring 52. Due to the engagement between the latch dogs 54 and the spider 23, the spider is also depressed against the reaction of spring 44 relieving the filter 16 of tension and tensioning the filter 26. Such downward movement of the plunger 50 also drives the ram 47 through the channel 35 to force material into the sack 36 as illustrated in Figure 2. When the parts of the apparatus reach the position illustrated in Figure 2, they are substantially at the lower end of their path of movement with the ends 58 of the latch dogs engaging the sloped bottom portion 59 of the slots in the pedestal 24. A slight further movement of the plunger in a downward direction causes the latch dogs to rotate toward each other against the spring 55 and to release the spider 23 to the force of spring 44 which then snaps the spider to the position of Figure 1 imparting a vigorous shaking action to the filter to relieve the same of embedded dirt and to cause the sarne to gravitate into the funnel 17. The sudden upward movement imparted to the plunger 56? shakes the same free of any dirt which may be engaged in the sack 36 and withdraws the same to a position above the discharge conduit 35 of the funnel 17. When the handle 51 is released, the spring 52 then returns the plunger 50 to the Figure 1 position and the latch dogs re-engage into the Figure 1 position by first contacting the curved guides 60 on the lower side of the hub portion of the spider 23 to rotate the latch dogs towards each other so as to pass through and to engage the upper part of the spider 23.

in the use of the foregoing apparatus, the valve 13 will swing to open position while the fan is operating due to the fact that the pressure within conduit 12 will be greater than the pressure within the filters 16 and 26. After each cleaning operation, the valve 13 will close by gravity and the filtering structure should then be cleaned by imparting several downward strokes to the handle 51, each of which will function to subject the filter to a quick, snapping, cleaning action and will also force the accumulated dirt through the funnel into the storage and disposing sack 36. In addition, the plunger 47 compacts the accumulated dirt in the sack 36 as the same begins to fill up so that the sack will accommodate a large quantity of dirt before it need be replaced. It is to be noted that the air pressure within the sack 36 in operation will slightly exceed the pressure on the exterior thereof due to the pressure differential across the filter. This is advantageous in that it maintains the sack inflated at all times and insures that the same will not collapse into the path traversed by the ram 50 during the filter cleaning operation. If the filter cleaning and clearing mechanism is actuated after each operation, the filter will be maintained at close to maximum efficiency throughout its life. Once a quantity of dirt sufficient to fill the container 36 is accumulated, the operator opens the door 39, removes the elastic band 37' and then removes the filled sack 36 for ultimate disposal. Before operating the machine again, a fresh disposing sack is applied to the lower end of the funnel 17.

Referring now to Figures 3 and 4, a modification of the invention is illustrated as being applied to a handle propelled type of cleaner 70 having a suction producing fan 71 discharging through a conduit 72. A propelling handle 73 is detachably secured at its lower end by a bolt and nut 74 to the mid-portion of a handle bail 75, the lower ends of the legs of which are pivoted as at 76 on handle mounting wings 77 projecting from the rear portion of the cleaner 70.

A filter mounting fitting 78 is secured to the cleaner 70 as by means of studs 79. The fitting 78 is provided with a hollow nipple 80 aligned with the discharge conduit 72 and air sealed therearound by means of a gasket 81. An impervious flexible conduit 82 is secured around the nipple 80 at its lower end and at its upper end to a nipple 83 projecting below a mounting plate structure 84 which seats within a tubular filter 85 of textile filter fabric. The filter 85 is clamped to the outer periphery of the fitting 84 by means of a circumferential clamping band 86 which is carried by a leaf spring support 87 in an indentation in the handle 73.

The lower end of the filter 85 is also clamped around the fitting 78 by means of a clamping band 88.

The conduit 82 is provided on its underside with a steel stay 89 sewn thereinto for the purpose of preventing collapse of the member 82 during flexure. The fitting 84 is provided with a pair of upstanding ears 90 on opposite sides of and spaced from the opening in the nipple 83. Ears 90 support a pintle 91 upon which a valve 92 for the nipple 83 is mounted. The valve 92 is gravity-biased to closed position, illustrated in Figure 3, and is moved to the open position by air pressure in conduit 82 when the cleaner is operated.

The fitting 84 is provided with a second large size nipple 94 also opening through the body of the fitting 84 which slidably receives a shouldered mounting ring 95 to which an impervious dirt receptacle 96 is attached. The receptacle 96 has a sliding air tight fit with the outer surface of the nipple 94 and is retained in position by a spring latch 97 mounted on the fitting 84 and engaging under the shoulder on the ring 95 when the parts are in the assembled relation of Figure 3. The container 96, as shown herein, may be of flexible or rigid impervious material having a smooth inner surface so that dirt collected therefrom may be readily emptied into another container for ultimate disposition. It is within the scope of the invention, however, to secure a disposable paper container on the nipple 94 similarly to that illustrated in the form of the invention illustrated in Figures 1 and 2. The lower end of the filter 85 between the fittings 84 and 78 is provided with an elongated slot which is closed by a slide fastener 98 to provide ready access to the container 96 and to hide the same from view whenthe cleaner is in use.

The upper end of the filter 85 is held against a curved clamping plate 99 and is urged into air sealed engagement therewith by an inner similarly shaped plate 100 QYZIAAQB which is provided witha projecting stud 101-passing through the filter, plate 99 and support arm102-towhich it is secured by. a nut which draws the plates 99and .100 tightly together.

The arm 102 is fixedly attached .to.a tube 103 mounted internally of the handle 73. The lower end of the tube 103 carries a collar 104 which is slidable .within the handle 73 and forms a guide for the tube 103. The tube 103 is also slidable in a fixed guide bearing member. 105 which is fixedly attached to the handle 73. The lower end of the tube 103 also carries a closure plug 106-.having a rod 107 projecting therefrom andextending .through a central opening in a guide plug 108fixedly secured to the handle well below the tube 103. A compression spring 109 surrounds the rod 107 and bearsbetween the plug 106 and the guide member l08 to biastube 103 and hence the filter 85 to the filter tensioning position illustrated in Figure 3.

A second tube 110 is slidably mounted in thetube 103 and has an actuating handle 111 alfixed to the upper end thereof. The handle 111 extends through suitable slots in tube 103 and in the handle 73 to the exterior of these elements. The support arm 102 for the upper portion of the filter also extends through the same slot in thehandle 73. The tube 110 and handle 111 are biased to the upperlimits of their movement, illustrated in Figure 3, by means of a tension spring 112-extending between the inner end of the handle 111 and a plug ll4 fixedly secured to the handle adjacent its upper end.

The tube 110 pivotally supports a latch dog.115 which, in the position of the parts illustrated in Figure'3, extends through aligned openings116 in the tubes:103 and 110 to latch these members together. A small spring 117 biases the latch. dog 11510 the engaging position illustrated.

The plate 100 also carries a depending rod 120 extending downwardly in the filter 85 which terminates at its lower end in a cross-bar 121 engaged at its end with a pair of dirt feeding rams 122 pivotally supported on the pintle 91. The rams 122 have an arcuate configuration and clear the opening in the nipple 94 when the filter is inits normal tensioned position illustrated in Figure 3.

When the handle 111 is depressed from the Figure 3 position to lower the tube 110 in the handle against the tension spring 112, the tube 103 is also depressed in the handle due to the engagement between the tube provided by the latch dog 115. As tube 103 travels downwardly in the handle against the compression of spring 109, it carries the support arm 102 therewith and rocks the dirt ram 122 down to the Figure 4 position which feeds dirt to the lower end of the filter through the nipple 94 into the receptacle 96 and packs the dirt therein. As the handle 111 reaches the lower end of its path of movement, the latch dog 115 engages the cone-shaped upper surface of the guide bearing member 105 which forces the latch inwardly of the tube 110 against spring 117 to disengage the same from tube 103 which thereupon suddenly turns to the Figure 3 position under the force of the spring 112 imparting a sudden snap to the filter 85 to free the same of accumulated dirt which drops downwardly by gravity into the lower end thereof. The spring 109 then returns the tube 103 to the Figure 3 position as soon as it is released and the latch dog automatically re-engages the tubes for a subsequent filter cleaning operation.

The cleaner handle 73 also carries a plate 125 on which is mounted a control switch 126 for the cleaner motor. A service cord 127 is anchored by and extends through the plate 125 into the interior of the handle. Service conductors 128 extend from the switch 126 and service cord 127 through the handle to the motor. The conductors 128 are threaded through suitable openings in the plugs 114, 104, 108 and guide bearing member 105 so as to be clear of the moving parts of the filter cleaning mechanism.

In this. form of the invent-ion, like that idiscussedabove and illustrated in Figures 1 and 2,. the filter is subjected to a sudden. snapping action tofree the same-of .dirt and each operation of the filter cleaning mechanism drives the ram through the passageway connecting the filter with theyimperviousdirt storage container to move previously liberated dirt into the container where it is out of the path, of the air stream and will not. be re-deposited on the interior walls of the filter.

In each form of my invention, the filter is actuated by depressing a handle member which relaxes the filter to a predetermined degreewhile tensioning asnapping spring. At the lower end of the stroke, the handle is disconnected from ,the filter which thereupon snaps to its .normal .tensioned position with considerable force to liberate entrained dust therefrom. Further, each time the filter cleaning mechanism is depressed, a ram mechanism is operated toremove previously liberated dirtfrom the filter andto discharge the same intothe impervious .container for ultimate disposition.

While the invention has been illustrated :and described in detail herein, it is not to be limited thereto but various changes may be made in the construction, design .andarrangement of parts without departing from thespirit of the invention or the scope of theclaims.

I claim:

1. In a suctioncleaner, a fabric filter havingan inlet for dirt laden air and a dirt outlet, a dirt container con nected to receive dirt discharged through said outlet, a ram for forcing dirtfrom said filter through said outlet into said. container, a spring connected tosaid filter and normally maintaining the same under tension, and means for simultaneously relaxing said filter against the bias. of said spring and actuating said ram tof orce dirt through said outlet and for thereafter suddenly-releasingsaid filter to said spring to subject the same to a snapping cleaning action and forwithdrawing said ram from said outlet.

2. In-a suction cleaner, a filter support, a fabric filter having one part thereof fixedly attached to said support, a slider on said support attached to another part of said filter, a spring on said support biasing said slider in a direction to hold said filter taut, an air inlet conduit for supplying dirt laden air to said filter, a container for dirt, a ramfor feeding dirt removed from said filter into said container, manually operated means for simultaneously moving .saidrslider against the bias of said spring to relax said filter and for actuating said ram to feed dirt into said container, and means operable after a predetermined movement of said slider for disconnecting said manually actuated means whereby said spring snaps said filter taut.

3. Apparatus according to claim 2 in which said dirt container is in the form of a removable impervious disposable paper sack.

4. Apparatus according to claim 2 in which said filter is in the form of a container, said air inlet is fixedly mounted on said support and opens into said filter, said dirt container is fixedly attached to said support, said one part of said filter has an opening to said dirt container, and said ram is mounted in said filter to move through said opening to feed dirt into said dirt container.

5. Apparatus according to claim 2 in which said support comprises a tubular propelling handle attached to a cleaner body housing a suction producing unit having a discharge duct communicating with said conduit, said filter is in the form of a container and said air inlet conduit and dirt container open into said filter and are sup ported by said handle, and said slider is slidably mounted Within said tubular handle.

6. Apparatus according to claim 2 including a cleaner housing encasing said filter and said dirt container, a partition in said housing separating the same into a first chamber encasing said filter and a second chamber encasing said dirt container and a suction producing unit for producing air flow through said conduit and said filter, in which said filter is in the form of a container having an inlet receiving said air inlet conduit and an outlet secured to a discharge conduit extending through said partition and detachably connected to said dirt container, said filter support comprises a tubular member fixed to said housing and extending into said filter, and said slider is mounted on said tubular member within said filter and carries said ram in position to pass through said discharge conduit when said manually operated means is operated.

7. Apparatus according to claim 5 in which said manually operated means is slidably mounted in said handle, said disconnecting means is mounted within said handle,

and said ram is carried by said handle and is actuated by said slider.

8. In a suction cleaner, a housing, a partition in said housing dividing the same into upper and lower chambers, a motor fan unit in said lower chamber having an air inlet opening to said chamber and an air outlet to the exterior of said housing, a funnel carried by and opening through said partition, an air inlet conduit opening into said upper chamber adjacent said funnel, a fabric filter container in said upper chamber having a lower part secured around said conduit and the upper end of said funnel, a tubular post depending from the upper wall of said housing into said filter, a spider structure slidably mounted on said post and having a peripheral part secured to said filter, a ram carried by said spider in position to pass through said funnel, a spring biasing said spider upwardly in said chamber to hold the portion of said filter between said funnel and spider taut, a dirt container in said lower chamber detachably connected to said funnel, said partition having openings therein to allow filtered air to flow into said suction producing unit, a handle member slidable in said post member and biased upwardly with respect thereto, a latch carried by said handle engaging said spider whereby to relax said filter and to project said ram through said funnel when said spider is moved downwardly against said spring, and means on said post for releasing said latch when said handle is lowered to a predetermined degree.

9. In a suction cleaner, a filter support, a fabric filter container, a dirt laden air inlet conduit carried by said support and opening into said filter, a dirt outlet conduit carried by said support and opening into said filter, means fixedly attaching said filter to said conduits, a slider on said support, means attaching a part of said filter remote from said conduits to said slider, a ram in said filter positioned to pass through said discharge conduit, means connecting saidram to said slider to be actuated thereby, a spring biasing said slider in a direction to hold said filter taut and to retract said ram from said outlet, a dirt container detachably secured to said outlet, and manually actuated means for moving said slider against said spring to relax said filter and to project said ram through said outlet.

10. Apparatus according to claim 9 in which said dirt container comprises a disposable paper sack and includes a rubber ring securing the inlet mouth of said sack about said outlet.

11. In a suction cleaner, a housing, a fabric filter in the housing having an outlet portion in the lower part thereof fixedly secured to the housing, a filter snapping mechanism connected to a portion of the filter removed from the outlet portion thereof and including spring means normally maintaining the filter taut and manually operated means for relaxing the filter against the bias of the spring means and then suddenly releasing the filter to be snapped taut by the spring means to loosen collected dirt from the filter, a discharge conduit mounted in the casing and connected to the outlet of the filter to receive dirt discharging therefrom, a disposable container releasably connected to the conduit to receive collected dirt therefrom, and a ram in the filter mounted on the snapping mechanism in position to force dirt into the container each time the snapping mechanism is actuated to snap the filter.

12. Apparatus according to claim 11 wherein the container consists of an impervious paper sack.

13. Apparatus according to claim 12 including an air inlet to the filterto conduct dirt-laden air thereinto and a suction producing unit in the casing arranged to produce a flow of air through the air inlet and filter and thence around the container'to maintain the container inflated.

References Citedin the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,933,105 Forsberg 4-]. Oct. 31, 1933 2,187,164 Leathers Jan. 16, 1940 2,283,836 White May 19, 1942 2,287,921 White June 30, 1942 2,287,924 White June 30, 1942 2,482,166 Gage Sept. 20, 1949 2,626,418 Kelly et al. 7 Jan. 27, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1933105 *Mar 30, 1932Oct 31, 1933Electrolux CorpVacuum cleaner
US2187164 *Jan 21, 1937Jan 16, 1940Quadrex CorpPush-broom-type vacuum cleaner
US2283836 *Dec 7, 1940May 19, 1942Hoover CoSuction cleaner
US2287921 *Nov 18, 1939Jun 30, 1942Hoover CoSuction cleaner
US2287924 *Dec 21, 1940Jun 30, 1942Hoover CoSuction cleaner
US2482166 *Jul 16, 1947Sep 20, 1949Gage William IStationary filter type suction cleaner
US2626418 *Sep 10, 1948Jan 27, 1953Kingston Products CorpNozzle casing for broom-type vacuum cleaners
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3255480 *Aug 14, 1962Jun 14, 1966Hoover CoSuction cleaners
US3279157 *Jan 15, 1963Oct 18, 1966Electrolux AbSuction cleaner
US3411174 *Oct 21, 1965Nov 19, 1968Howard E. JordanDirt removal and disposal unit
US3653190 *Feb 11, 1970Apr 4, 1972Clarkson Ind IncVacuum cleaners
US3961921 *Oct 15, 1974Jun 8, 1976Vernco CorporationVacuum cleaner with an impermeable collector bag
US4028074 *Oct 14, 1975Jun 7, 1977Air Filters, Inc.Vacuum cleaner filter bag
US4244717 *Nov 15, 1978Jan 13, 1981General Motors CorporationSystem for collecting solid particles entrained in a gas stream
US4405346 *Jul 13, 1981Sep 20, 1983The Hoover CompanyCleaner with dirt cup
US4921510 *May 12, 1989May 1, 1990Arnold PlooyVacuum cleaner system
US5045098 *Aug 13, 1990Sep 3, 1991The Spencer Turbine CompanyBag separator
US6230361Dec 15, 1999May 15, 2001Shop Vac CorporationDust pan closure for a vacuum cleaner
US6569217May 10, 2000May 27, 2003Thomas M. DeMarcoIndustrial dust collector with multiple filter compartments
US6991666 *Jan 24, 2002Jan 31, 2006Dyson LimitedCollecting chamber for a vacuum cleaner
US7547340Dec 9, 2005Jun 16, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Dust collecting unit of vacuum cleaner
US7854782 *Oct 19, 2007Dec 21, 2010Samsung Gwangju Electronics Co., Ltd.Vacuum cleaner
US7958598 *Dec 27, 2007Jun 14, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US7987551Mar 20, 2009Aug 2, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US7992252Feb 12, 2010Aug 9, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US7992253Mar 18, 2009Aug 9, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US7998234Mar 19, 2009Aug 16, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US8012250Mar 20, 2009Sep 6, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US8021452Mar 16, 2009Sep 20, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US8029584Jun 4, 2008Oct 4, 2011Castronovo Charles AVacuum cleaners with self-cleaning filtration, and other self-cleaning filters
US8043397Mar 19, 2009Oct 25, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US8043410Mar 19, 2009Oct 25, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US8060979Jul 31, 2007Nov 22, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US8151409Feb 23, 2010Apr 10, 2012Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US8211216Jul 29, 2011Jul 3, 2012Castronovo Charles AVacuum cleaners with self-cleaning filtration, and other self-cleaning filters
US8240001Mar 16, 2009Aug 14, 2012Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US8281455Mar 20, 2009Oct 9, 2012Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US8312593Mar 16, 2009Nov 20, 2012Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US8404034Mar 20, 2009Mar 26, 2013Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner and method of controlling the same
US8528163Feb 12, 2010Sep 10, 2013Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US8544143 *Mar 19, 2009Oct 1, 2013Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US8713752Mar 9, 2010May 6, 2014Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US8726459Mar 18, 2009May 20, 2014Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US8881343Feb 12, 2010Nov 11, 2014Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US8978197Mar 9, 2010Mar 17, 2015Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US9687128Dec 18, 2015Jun 27, 2017Bissell Homecare, Inc.Surface cleaning apparatus with debris ejector
US20040074213 *Jan 24, 2002Apr 22, 2004Organ Stephen PaulCollecting chamber for a vacuum cleaner
US20050274094 *Aug 25, 2005Dec 15, 2005Demarco Thomas MVacuum loader
US20060123749 *Dec 9, 2005Jun 15, 2006Lg Electronics Inc.Dust collecting unit of vacuum cleaner
US20060207230 *May 17, 2006Sep 21, 2006Demarco Maxvac CorporationVacuum loader with filter doors
US20070143953 *Nov 30, 2006Jun 28, 2007Hwang Man TVacuum cleaner
US20080023036 *Jul 31, 2007Jan 31, 2008Ha Gun HVacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US20080172824 *Dec 27, 2007Jul 24, 2008Yun Chang HoVacuum cleaner
US20080264016 *Oct 19, 2007Oct 30, 2008Samsung Gwangju Electronics Co., Ltd.Vacuum Cleaner
US20080302070 *Jun 4, 2008Dec 11, 2008Castronovo Charles AVacuum Cleaners with Self-Cleaning Filtration, and other Self-Cleaning Filters
US20090178231 *Mar 16, 2009Jul 16, 2009Lg Electronics, Inc.Vaccum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US20090178236 *Mar 18, 2009Jul 16, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner
US20090229072 *Mar 16, 2009Sep 17, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US20090229073 *Mar 19, 2009Sep 17, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Vaccum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US20090235956 *Mar 16, 2009Sep 24, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US20090249578 *Mar 20, 2009Oct 8, 2009Man Tae HwangVacuum cleaner
US20090255083 *Mar 20, 2009Oct 15, 2009Man Tae HwangVacuum cleaner
US20090293221 *Mar 19, 2009Dec 3, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operating the same
US20090293915 *Mar 19, 2009Dec 3, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Vacuum cleaner with removable dust collector, and methods of operatng the same
US20100199456 *Feb 12, 2010Aug 12, 2010Sang-Jun ParkVacuum cleaner
US20100199457 *Feb 12, 2010Aug 12, 2010Sang-Jun ParkVacuum cleaner
US20100212105 *Feb 23, 2010Aug 26, 2010Ha Gun HoVacuum cleaner
US20100229330 *Feb 12, 2010Sep 16, 2010Sang-Jun ParkVacuum cleaner
US20100229331 *Mar 9, 2010Sep 16, 2010Sung Su KangVacuum cleaner
US20100229332 *Mar 9, 2010Sep 16, 2010Sung Su KangVacuum cleaner
DE3717333A1 *May 22, 1987Dec 3, 1987Ryobi LtdStaubsammelvorrichtung
EP1671569A1 *Dec 1, 2005Jun 21, 2006LG Electronics Inc.Dust collecting unit of vacuum cleaner and vacuum cleaner with the dust collecting unit
WO2000054644A1 *Mar 15, 2000Sep 21, 2000BSH Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbHMethod for emptying a container that is provided on or in a vacuum cleaner and corresponding container, vacuum cleaner with container and dust collecting system for carrying out the method
WO2002085175A1 *Mar 19, 2002Oct 31, 2002Seb S.A.Device for compacting waste in a vacuum cleaner
Classifications
U.S. Classification55/305, 55/DIG.300, 55/429, 55/366, 15/327.1
International ClassificationA47L9/10, A47L5/28, A47L5/36
Cooperative ClassificationA47L5/28, A47L5/365, Y10S55/03, A47L9/108
European ClassificationA47L5/36B, A47L5/28, A47L9/10D2