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Publication numberUS2715674 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1955
Filing dateMar 12, 1953
Priority dateMar 12, 1953
Publication numberUS 2715674 A, US 2715674A, US-A-2715674, US2715674 A, US2715674A
InventorsHoward C Abbott, Thomas J Mcdermott
Original AssigneeHoward C Abbott, Thomas J Mcdermott
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrically heated mattress and sleeping pad
US 2715674 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' g- 1955 H. c. ABBOTT ET AL ELECTRICALLY HEATED MATTRESS AND SLEEPING PAD Filed March 12, 1955' 3 j yyfoiidf gi/milai ZZ 00mm g 97mm v 5% W 10 fir? United States Patent ELECTRICALLY HEATED MATTRESS AND SLEEPING PAD Howard C. Abbott, Chicago, and Thomas J. McDermott,

- Oak Park, Ill.

Application March 12, 1953', Serial No. 341,858

3 Claims. (Cl. 21946) Our invention relates to an electrically heated mattress and sleeping pad.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide an electrically heated mattress and sleeping pad, formed of a foam latex material of a thickness which will cause the heat to be transmitted to the body and which will cushion the heating element so that same does not impart any unevenness or lumping to the pad.

Other objects of this invention are to provide an electrically heated mattress and pad formed of a material such as foam latex which may be used by persons with allergic conditions, which will not absorb liquids, moisture or perspiration, which is sanitary, and which is highly resilient.

The prior art electrically heated mattress and sleeping pads are made of a cloth or fabric material in which the heating element is sewn or stitched to the cloth. Such cloth pads or coverings are objectionable to persons suffering from allergic conditions, likewise the cloth tends to absorb water, moisture and perspiration and hence become unsanitary unless cleaned frequently. Furthermore such cloth coverings are not sufficiently resilient. In addition such fabric coverings require the use of sewing machines and skilled operators and the stitching of the heating element or electric wire to the pad is laborious and time consuming, all adding to the cost of the product. All of the foregoing objections are eliminated with the use of this invention.

Other objects will become apparent at this description progresses:

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view partly broken away of a heated mattress and sleeping pad in accordance with our invention.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken on lines 22 of Fig. 1, and

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on lines 33 of Fig. 1.

The pad is made up of a pair of layers of foam latex material, indicated at and 12, cemented together, between which is secured, as will be presently described, the heating means. The layers 10 and 12 of foam latex material are each approximately inch in thickness and of a length and width of the size of a mattress.

The heating means generally indicated at 14, which is positioned between the two layers 10 and 12, comprises a resistant alloy wire 16 preferably of a size number 33, American Wire Guage. This wire is wound helically around a plastic core 18 and both the core 18 and wire 16 are enclosed in a sleeve 19 which is formed of a thermoplastic coating compound. The wire 16 preferably has a resistance of three ohms per running foot and develops a maximum temperature of 75 C. The heat developed by the pad is determined by the total resistance of the heating means, the length of which is adjusted so as to develop a temperature which is about three degrees above normal body temperature. This condition is true so long as the heat can be dissipated into the surrounding space. Thus, under such a condition the heat of the pad will never exceed the temperature indicated. The heating means 14 is preferably in a continuous length, as shown in Fig. 1, and is arranged in a pattern comprising a series of reversing lines which are spaced in substantially parallel relationship so as to cover approximately of the area of the pad. Thus, the head portion of the pad indicated by the numeral 17 upon which the pillow rests has no heating means, while the major portion of the pad on which an individual would normally recline, is substantially covered with a network of the heating means. While the heating means is shown as arranged in a reversing line pattern, it will be understood that it may be arranged in any suitable pattern, such as concentric circles, a spiral or any other pattern desired.

A rubber cement 20 is applied to the inside of each of the layers 10 and 12 and the heating means is then laid out, as shown in Fig. 1 on one of said layers and the other layer is then superimposed so that the two layers of foam latex adhere to each other with the heating element securely positioned therebetween.

The terminal portions 14a and 14b of the heating means 14 are attached to the terminals of a conventional electric cord 22 which is connected to a conventional elec tric plug 24. A switch 26 may be connected on the circuit. A strip of tape material 28 of rectangular shape is positioned adjacent the electrical cord 22 and is cemented and secured between the two layers of foam latex 10 and 12. This prevents any breaking or disconnecting of the terminal portion which may be caused normally by virtue of any tensile stresses applied to the cord.

With the two layers secured as described, a fabric tape 30 is rubber cemented and secured to the border completely around the sides and ends of the pad with the fabric tape overlapping the layers. The pad may be cleaned in the usual manner in which foam latex is cleaned. The electrical wires associated therewith are completely enclosed and waterproofed. Since foam latex is an insulator, uncovered electrical wire may be used. The pad may be used for infants as it will not absorb any liquid, nor will it absorb moisture or perspiration. Due to the resiliency of the pad the danger of breaking of the electrical wire 16 is eliminated.

In use, the pad aforedescribed is merely placed on a conventional mattress to overlie the top surface thereof.

It will be understood that various changes and modifications may be made from the foregoing without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. An electrically heated mattress pad adapted to be removably positioned over a mattress and comprising a pad body formed of a pair of foam latex layers secured together by a rubber cement, each layer being approximately A inch in thickness and of a size to substantially cover an entire mattress, an electrical heating element disposed and secured between said layers to cover substantially not more than three-fourths of the area thereof with the head portion of said pad without said heating element, said heating element adapted to develope a maximum temperature of C. and including a wire spirally wound around a core with said wire and core covered by a sleeve in contact with the adjacent surfaces of said latex layers, and a tape secured around the border of said pad.

2. An electrically heated mattress pad adapted to be removably positioned over a mattress and comprising a pad body formed of a pair of foam latex layers secured together by a rubber cement, each layer being approximately A inch in thickness and of a size to substantially cover an entire mattress, an electrical heating element disposed and secured between said layers to cover substantially not more than three-fourths of the area thereof with the head portion of said pad without said heating element, the terminal portions of said heating element connected to an electrical cord extending through said head portion adjacent one side thereof, a strip of tape material positioned adjacent the electrical cord and cemented and secured between the foam latex layers, said heating element adapted to develope a maximum temperature of 75 C., and a tape secured around the border of said pad.

3. An electrically heated mattress pad adapted to be removably positioned over a mattress and comprising a pad body formed of a pair of foam latex layers secured together by a rubber cement, each layer being approximately inch in thickness and of a size to substantially cover an entire mattress, an electrical heating element disposed and secured between said layers to cover substantially not more than three-fourths of the area thereof With the head portion of said pad without said heating element, the terminal portions of said heating element connected to an electrical cord extending through said head portion adjacent one side thereof, a strip of References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 21,474 McCleary June 4, 1940 1,837,117 Dunbar Dec. 15, 1931 1,997,899 Dick Apr. 16, 1935 2,288,232 Driscoll June 30, 1942 2,298,181 Stranszky Oct. 6, 1942 2,606,996 Westerberg et al. Aug. 12, 1952 2,688,070 Freedlander Aug. 31, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1837117 *May 31, 1930Dec 15, 1931Pauline S DunbarHeated mattress
US1997899 *Aug 22, 1931Apr 16, 1935Talbert M DickElectrically heated pad
US2288232 *Jun 9, 1941Jun 30, 1942Edward A DriscollElectric heating pad
US2298181 *Oct 7, 1940Oct 6, 1942Gerrit Van DaamElectric therapeutic bandage
US2606996 *Jan 18, 1949Aug 12, 1952Tempret Products IncElectrically heated mattress
US2688070 *Mar 14, 1950Aug 31, 1954Dayton Rubber CompanyElectrically heated mattress construction
USRE21474 *Jun 19, 1939Jun 4, 1940 Heating pad
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2948802 *May 5, 1958Aug 9, 1960Robert F ShawElectric blanket
US2976393 *Sep 5, 1958Mar 21, 1961Ronald Illingworth AlecFloor coverings, underfelts, underlays and the like
US2985742 *Jun 15, 1959May 23, 1961Fred L ReaHeating means for toilet seats, bedpans and the like
US3010007 *May 25, 1959Nov 21, 1961Electric Parts CorpFlexible radiant heating panel
US3017493 *Jan 22, 1960Jan 16, 1962Pyrexon Ray Company LtdHeated car seat
US3041441 *May 24, 1960Jun 26, 1962Roland B ElbertPortable stock warmer
US3043943 *Dec 24, 1959Jul 10, 1962Cornwall CorpFood warmer
US3096428 *Apr 3, 1961Jul 2, 1963Sara M BarbaresiTherapeutic warming pad for animals
US3102186 *Jun 15, 1961Aug 27, 1963Dreamland Electrical ApplianceElectric blankets
US3108596 *Sep 29, 1961Oct 29, 1963Carlos W VeachHeating pad
US3153140 *Sep 12, 1961Oct 13, 1964Electric Parts CorpRadiant heating panel
US3172072 *Apr 25, 1961Mar 2, 1965Specialty ConvertersReinforced foam in sheet form
US3249959 *Dec 27, 1963May 10, 1966Theckston Dana LWiper blade with embedded heating element
US3336557 *Mar 4, 1966Aug 15, 1967Robert MeinichElectrical heating mats and blanks therefor
US3423574 *Oct 14, 1965Jan 21, 1969Sanders Associates IncElectrical resistance heating pad
US3840985 *Sep 17, 1973Oct 15, 1974Safeway Products IncMethod of making water bed heater
US4162393 *Jul 18, 1978Jul 24, 1979Bel Air Industries Inc.Electric heating mattress
US4459461 *Sep 28, 1982Jul 10, 1984West Point Pepperell, Inc.Flocked electric blanket construction
US4629868 *Sep 28, 1984Dec 16, 1986Autopart Sweden AbHeating pad, particularly for vehicle seats
US5432322 *Nov 13, 1992Jul 11, 1995Bruder Healthcare CompanyElectric heating pad
US9668303Apr 17, 2014May 30, 2017Augustine Biomedical And Design, LlcFlexible electric heaters
US20120279953 *Mar 16, 2012Nov 8, 2012Augustine Biomedical And Design LlcHeated under-body warming systems
WO1994012004A1 *Nov 12, 1993May 26, 1994Bruder Healthcare CompanyElectric heating pad and method of making
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/212
International ClassificationH05B3/34
Cooperative ClassificationH05B3/342, H05B2203/003, H05B2203/017, H05B2203/014
European ClassificationH05B3/34B