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Publication numberUS2715999 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 23, 1955
Filing dateApr 7, 1949
Publication numberUS 2715999 A, US 2715999A, US-A-2715999, US2715999 A, US2715999A
InventorsT. M. Butler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
M butler
US 2715999 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 23, 1955 T. M. BUTLER 2,715,999

TRANSFER MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Original Filed April '7, 1949 6 Sheets-Sheet l ATTORNEYS Aug. 23, 1955 T. M. BUTLER TRANSFER MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Original Filed April 7, 1949 INVENTOR. fiioMAs M. BUTLER 6 om #QLQ/LMIZ,

ATTORNEYS Aug. 23, 1955 T. M. BUTLER TRANSFER MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Original Filed April 7, 1949 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR THOMAS M. BUTLER BY W4 ATTORN EYS Aug. 23, 1955 T. M. BUTLER TRANSFER MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Original Filed April 7, 1949 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR THOMAS M. Bu TLER BY ?M/ W ATTORNEYS Aug. 23, 1955 T. M. BUTLER 2,715,999

TRANSFER MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Original Filed April 7, 1949 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR THOMAS M. BUTLER BY aw, W

ATTO R N EYS Aug. 23, 1955 T. M. BUTLER 2,715,999

TRANSFER MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Original Filed April '7, 1949 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Fig. 16. Q Q 805 INVENTOR. 7710mm- M. 51mm AT TORNE Y5 ties i atcnt ice and

TRANSFER MECHANESM F 13R CALCULATING MACHINES Thomas M. Butler, Detroit, Mich, assignor to Burroughs Corporation, Detroit, Mich, a corporation of Michigan Original application April 7, 1949, Serial No. 35,971. Divided and this application April 17, 1952, Serial No. 282,843

6 filairns. (Cl. 235-437) This invention relates to improvements in transfer mechanism for totalizers or registers of calculating machines.

The present application is a division of my original application Serial N0. 85,971 filed April 7, 1949, and now abandoned. part of said original application are Serial No. 167,875, filed June 13, 1950, now Patent No. 2,627,333, Serial No. 174,696, filed July 19, 1950, now Patent No. 2,629,549, Serial No. 181,401, filed August 25, 1950,

now Patent No. 2,635,732, Serial No. 196,844, filed November 21, 1950, now Patent No. 2,644,637, Serial No. 252,713, filed October 23, 1951, now Patent No. 2,693,906, and Serial No. 278,260, filed March 24, 1952.

An object of the present invention is to provide improved transfer mechanism for adding and subtracting totalizers or registers and characterized by great reliability and rapidity of operation.

A further object is to provide an improved transfer mechanism for adding and subtracting totalizers and registers and adapted to perform carrying and borrowing operations automatically without control connections to control means external of the totalizer or register.

A further object is to provide a transfer mechanism for totalizcrs or registers performing direct subtraction rather than complemental addition, in which transfer mechanism the adding or subtracting character of the transfers is determined under control of the totalizers or register pinions or other accumulating elements as they are moved through transfer points and automatically in accordance with the adding and subtracting directions of such movements.

A further obiect is to provide an improved transfer mechanism for algebraic totalizers and having improved means for automatic correction of fugitive 1 errors so that the totalizer will yield correct positive and negative totals.

A further object is to provide an improved transfer mechanism for algebraic totalizers and having improved means for automatic correction of fugitive 1 errors in which the additive or subtractive character of the correction is determined automatically by the highest order totalizer pinion in accordance with its direction of rotation when a change of sign of the total accumulated in the totalizer occurs. a

The invention is disclosed hereinafter as applied to an adding and subtracting totalizer or crossfooter" of a Burroughs Sensirnatic (registered trade-mark) accounting machine like that disclosed in detail in my abovementioned Patent No. 2,629,549. It will be readily apparent that the invention may also be applied to other totalizers and registers or multiple register units.

in the accompanying drawings, showing one preferred embodiment of the present invention:

Fig. 1 is a perspective of the main frame of the totalizer as viewed from forwardly, rightwardly and above;

Fig. 2 is a detail of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a perspective of the totalizer pinions and Other divisions and continuations-innumeral 511.

supporting frame for said pinions as viewed from a point forwardly, rightwardly and above;

Fig. 4 is a detail of Fig. 3 with some of the elements shown in separated relationship;

Pig. 5 is a fore-and-aft vertical section through the totalizer including the transfer mechanism of the present invention, looking toward the right and showing the parts in partially operated positions during an adding operation;

Fig. 6 is a View similar to Fig. 5 but showing the parts at a later time in the adding operation;

Fig. 7 is a detail showing certain parts in a positive total-taking operation;

Fig. 8 is similar to Fig. 5 but shows the parts in par tially operated positions during a subtracting operation;

Fig. 9 is similar to Fig. 8 but shows the parts at a later time in the subtracting operation;

Fig. 10 is a perspective detail of certain parts in a direct negative total-taking operation;

Fig. 11 is a partial top plan of the totalizer;

Fig. 12 is a spread perspective of a fugitive 1 correction means and certain control elements associated therewith, omitting the intermediate orders of the transfer mechanism;

Fig. 13 is a detail of Fig. 12;

Fig. 14 is a spread perspective of an overcapacity fugitive 1 suppressing means and portions of an automatic negative total-taking control means;

Fig. 15 is a detail of Fig. 14 in left side elevation; and

Fig. 16 is a spread perspective of a single transfer train between consecutive orders of the totalizer.

The totalizer herein disclosed by way of example is one of the two identical crossfooters of the machine disclosed fully in my Patent No. 2,629,549.

in the drawings in the following description, the various elements are designated by the same reference numerals by which they are designated in my Patent No. 2,629,549. Consistently with the description in those prior applications, the terms clockwise and counterclockwise will be employed to describe rotary or swinging movements of the parts as viewed from above, in front, or from the right side of the machine and the terms rightward, leftward, forward, rearward, upward, downward will be employed to describe motions and positions of the parts as viewed normally from in front of the machine. The machine is a key-set motor-driven machine having twelve amount actuator racks, of which the highest (twelfth) order actuator rack is designated by the numeral 519 and the remaining eleven are designated by the reference Means are provided for driving the actuator racks, first forwardly to amount differential positions and subsequently rearwardly to their normal 0 positions, in each cycle of operation of the machine. In amount-entering operations, the forward excursions of the actuator racks are limited, proportionally to the frame and comprising a pair of side plates 762 (Figs. 1

and 11) which are connected in rigidly spaced relation by three cross rods 763, 764 and 765 having end portions of reduced diameter which pass through the side plates 762 and have nuts threaded thereon on the outer sides of the side plates 762. The forward end portions of two end plates 766 (Figs. 3, 4 and 11) of a pinion frame are secured on collars which are pinned on a shaft 767, the ends of which are journalled in bushings 768 which are secured in the side plates 762 and extend in wardly into engagement with the plates 766 to prevent lateral movement of the pinion frame. Rearwardly of the shaft 767 are two spacing strips 769 and 770 each having, on both ends, shoulders on both sides of tongues received in fitting slots in the end plates 766.

The ends of a shaft 771 pass through the rear end portions of the end plates 766 and have nuts threaded thereon to secure the end plates 766 against the shoulders on the spacing strips 769 and 778. Forwardly of the shaft 771 is a shaft 772, the ends of which extend through the plates 766 and support rollers 773, each confined between the outer side of the respective end plate 766 and a washer secured against a shoulder on the shaft by a nut threaded on the shaft-end. The shaft 771 supports, between the end plates 766, a rear line of computing pinions 774 and the shaft 772 supports a front line of computing pinions 775 each of which meshes with a corresponding one of the pinions 774. In the illustrated totalizer, adapted for calculation in the decimal system of numbers, each pinion 774 and 775 has ten teeths, one of which is longer than the other nine.

In both lines of pinions, each pinion 774 or 775 is rotatably mounted on a short sleeve 776 (Figs. 4 and 11) having on its right-hand end a small outwardly extending flange. The sleeves 776 of each line are mounted on a tube 777 on which there is also mounted, between each two adjacent sleeves 776 and at the left of the leftmost sleeve 776, a spacing sleeve 778 having a small outwardly extending flange on its right-hand end. On each tube 777 to the right of the rightmost sleeve 776 thereon is also mounted another spacing sleeve 779 having a thickened right-hand end portion 780. On each tube 777 to the left of the leftmost sleeve 778 is a further spacing sleeve 781. The sleeves 776, 778, 779 and 781 of each line are pressed closely together and held in position on the respective tube 777 by nuts threaded on the ends of the tubes, the length of each of the sleeves 776, exclusive of the thickness of its flange, being slightly but sufficiently greater than the thickness of the pinion 774 or 775 mounted thereon to insure free rotatability of the pinion on the sleeve.

The tubes 777 are each shorter than the distance between the end plates 766 to permit them, together with the lines of pinions 774 and 775 carried thereon, to slide axially a short distance on the shafts 771 and 772, respectively. The rear line of pinions 774 is braced intermediate its ends by two braces 782 secured to the spacing strip 770 and each having a sliding fit around one of the sleeves 778. The front line of pinions 775 is similarly braced by a brace 783 secured to the spacing strip 769. The brace 783 extends rearwardly to contact against one of the sleeves 778 of the rear line of pinions 774.

The right-hand end plate 766 has on its upper rearward portion an inturned lug 784 in which a headed stud 785 (Figs. 3, 11 and 12) is secured. A fourarmed lever 786, pivoted on the stud 785, has secured in its forward and rearward arms, respectively, two studs 787 which extend downwardly into bores in the thickened ends 780 of the two sleeves 779 whereby the two tubes 777 and the lines of pinions 774 and 775 thereon are connected together to slide'simultaneously in opposite directions on the shafts 771 and 772, respectively. A three-armed lever 788 located between the lug 784 and the lever 786 has in its forward and rearward arms and at its center three forwardly and rearwardly elongated slots through which the studs 785 and 787 pass so that the lever 788 can be adjusted for wardly and rearwardly relative to the lever 786. A headed screw 789 passes through a forwardly and rearwardly elongated slot in the rightward arm of the lever 786 and is threaded into the rightward arm of the lever 788 to secure the levers 786 and 788 together in adjusted relation.

The shifting of the tubes 777 in both directions is limited by engagement of the two tubes alternately against the right-hand end plate 766 and they are yieldingly retained at either limit by a detent pawl 790 pivoted on a headed stud 791 secured in the spacing strip 769. The pawl 790 is urged clockwise by a spring 792 connected between the pawl and the right-hand side member 762 to maintain a pointed cam nose thereon in engagement against a squared stud 793 which is secured in the leftward arm of the lever 786 with one of its diagonals aligned radially to the stud 785.

The pinion supporting frame 766, 769, 770, 771, 772, is normally positioned so that the pinions 774 and 775 are below and out of mesh with the twelve actuator racks. The position of the lever 788 and the positions of the pinions axially along the shafts 771 and 772 is such that the right-hand portion of each of the pinions 775 is in vertical alignment with the actuator rack for the same numerical order and the left-hand portion of each of the pinions 775 meshes with the right-hand portion of the pinion 774 for the same numerical order, the pinions being yieldingly retained in such position by the forward side of the pointed cam nose of the detent pawl 790 engaging against the lefthand rearward side of the squared stud 793. Upon clockwise movement of the lever 788, the pinions 774 are shifted rightward to place their right-hand portions in vertical alignment with the respective actuator racks and the pinions 775 are shifted leftward to such an extent that they are out of vertical alignment with the actuator racks, but the right-hand portion of each of the pinions 775 meshes with the left-hand portion of the pinion 774 for the same order. The thickness of the pinions 774' and 775 and the extent of lateral shifting of the pinions by the rocking of the lever 788 is so related to the thickness of the actuator racks and the pinions are so positioned on the tubes 777 as to permit the pinions 775 and the pinions 774 to be thus alternately placed in and out of vertical alignment with the actuator racks while constantly keeping each of the pinions 774 in mesh with the pinion 775 for the same order.

The pinion supporting frame is, as previously described, secured to the shaft 767 which is journalled in the side plates 762 whereby the pinion supporting frame is rockable to raise the pinions to mesh the pinions 775 or the pinions 774, depending upon the position of the lever 788, with the actuators S11 and 519. For that purpose, each of the rollers 773 is embraced in a cam slot 798 in an arm 799 (Figs. 5, 11 and 12) located adjacent the inner side of the respective side plate 762 and secured to a collar pinned to a shaft 808 journalled in bushings secured in side plates 762. Each of the two cam slots 798 comprises a short armate rear end portion concentric with the shaft 880, a longer forward arcuate portion also concentric with but at a greater radius from the center of the shaft 800, and an intermediate inclined portion connecting the forward and rearward concentric arcuate portions.

The shaft 888 and two arms 799 are normally so positioned that the rollers 773 are in the rearward short arcuate portions of shorter radius of the slots 798 so that the pinions 774 and 775 are in their lower positions out of mesh With the actuator racks. When the shaft 888 is rocked clockwise from its normal position by means controlled by the totalizer function controls as disclosed in my Patent No. 2,629,549, the rollers 773 and, thus, the pinion supporting frame are swung upwardly about the axis of the shaft 767 sufiiciently to mesh with the actuator racks the pinions 774 or 775 which are aligned with the actuators. Upon rocking the shaft 888 counterclockwise back to normal position, the pinions are again lowered to unrnesh them from the actuator racks. The shaft 5 300 and arms 799 are biased to normal position by a spring 801 (Figs. 11 and 12) connected between a stud secured in the left-hand arm 799 and a shaft 847 described hereinafter.

In a machine cycle in which an amount is to be added in the crossfooter, the pinions 775 are in their normal position of vertical alignment with the actuator racks and the shaft 800 is actuated to raise the pinion frame to mesh the pinions 775 with the actuator racks after the latter have been moved forwardly to and arrested in their ditferential positions corresponding to the amount to be entered. The pinions 775 are maintained in mesh with the actuator racks during the rearward return of the latter to their normal 0 positions and are then unmeshed from the actuator racks, whereby the actuator racks in their return rearwardly to 0 rotate each of the pinions 775 clockwise a number of tooth spaces squal to the digit in the corresponding order of the amount being added.

In a machine cycle in which an amount is to be subtracted in the totalizer, the pinions 775 are also in their normal vertical alignment with the actuator racks but are elevated into mesh with the actuator racks prior to the movement of the latter forwardly to their differential positions corresponding to the amount to be subtracted and are lowered to normal and unmeshed from the actuator racks after the latter have completed their forward movements but prior to the return of the actuator racks to their 0 positions. Thus, the pinions 775, in a subtracting operation, are rotated counterclockwise through numbers of tooth spaces equal to the digits in the corresponding orders of the amount subtracted.

In a machine cycle in which a positive total is to be taken from the totalizer, the pinions 775 are meshed with and unmeshed from the actuator racks at the same relative times as in a machine cycle in which an amount is subtracted in the totalizer, but, in total-taking cycles, the actuator racks are permitted to move forwardly without interference from the means which limit their forward movements in amount entering operations.

A shaft 802 (Figs. 3, 4, 5, 11 and 12), journalled in the two pinion frame end plates 766, has an upwardly and rearwardly directed blade 803 which extends along the shaft 802 from a point immediately adjacent the left-hand end plate 766 to a point close to the right-hand end plate 766. The portion of the shaft 8&2 from the right-hand end of the blade 803 to the right-hand end plate 766 is surrounded by a collar pinned to the shaft and having a short upwardly extending arm 804 secured to it. The upper end of the arm 804 has an upwardly open notch in it to form two fingers located forwardly and rearwardly, respectively, of the rearward one, 805, of two rods, 805 and S06, supported in aligned openings in the end plates 76% and held against endwise movement by a notched retaining plate 807 engaging in peripheral grooves in the right-hand end portions of the rods 805 and 806 and secured against the outer face of the righthand plate 766 by a headed screw. A spring 808 (Fig. 4), connected between the rod 806 and the upper edge of the blade 803 close to its left-hand end, normally yieldingly holds the rear finger of the arm 804 in engagement with the rod 805 and thus positions the upper edge of the blade 803 forwardly clear of the teeth of the pinions 775. An arm 809 is secured to a collar pinned on the right-hand end of the shaft 802 in an enlarged aperture 810 (Fig. 11) in the right-hand side plate 27 of the machine frame. The rearward end of the arm 809 carries a leftwardly projecting stud 311 (Figs. 3 and 12) to which is connected the rear end of a spring 812 connected at its forward end to the cross-bar of a yoke 813 having its side arms swingably supported on the shaft 802 on opposite sides of the collar to which the arm 809 is secured. A rearward extension of the right-hand side arm of the yoke 813 carries a stud 814 and has at its lower edge a lug 815 which extends leftwardly under the arm 800 with which it is normally yieldingly held in engagement by the spring 812.

When the machine is operated to take a total or subtotal from the totalizer, a means controlled by the totalizer function control means holds the stud 814 against moving upwardly as the pinion frame is elevated to mesh the pinions with the actuator racks. Thus, as the pinions are meshed with the actuator racks for total-taking, the blade 803 is rocked rearwardly to the position of Fig. 7 where its upper edge is in the path of the long tooth of each of the pinions 775. In positive total-taking, the actuator racks mesh with the pinions 775 and rotate them counterclockwise unless or until the long tooth of each pinion 775 engages the upper edge of the blade 803 whereby each pinion 775 is arrested in its 0 position and the actuator rack meshed therewith is arrested in the position corresponding to the digit in the corresponding order of the total thus taken from the totalizer.

In a total-taking operation, the pinions are unmeshed from the actuator racks and lowered to normal position while they remain in their 0 positions prior to the return of the actuator racks rearwardly to their normal positions, but in subtotal-taking operations, the pinions remain meshed with the actuator racks during their return to normal so that the total printed is re-inserted in the totalizer by returning the pinions to the positions they occupied at the beginning of the subtotal-taking operation. The spring 808 restores the blade 803 to its normal position.

If the aggregate of amounts subtracted exceeds the aggregate of amounts added so that an overdraft or negative total occurs in the totalizer, the true negative total or subtotal may be taken from the totalizer and printed. For taking a negative total or subtotal, the machine is conditioned just as it is for taking a positive total or subtotal except that, before the pinions are raised to mesh them with the actuator racks, the lever 78% is rocked clockwise to shift the pinions 775 out of alignment and the pinions 774 into alignment with the actuator racks before the pinion frame is raised, so that the pinions 77d, instead of the pinions 775, are meshed with the actuator racks. Thus, as the actuator racks move forwardly in negative total-taking and subtotal-taking operations, they rotate the pinions 774 counterclockwise and the pinions 775 clockwise unless and until the long tooth of each pinion 774 is arrested by engagement with the upper ends of teeth 816 on the forward upper edge of the spacing strip 770. The teeth 816 on the spacing strip 770 are so spaced and dimensioned that when the pinions 774 are out of alignment with the actuator racks, as they are in adding, subtracting and positive totaltaking and positive subtotal-taking operations, the long teeth of the pinions 774 may pass freely between the teeth 816, but when the pinions 774 are aligned with the actuator racks, as they are in negative total-taking and negative subtotal-taking operations, the teeth 816 are in the pathsof the long teeth of the pinions 774.

Each pinion 774 is continuously meshed with the pinion 775 for the same order in such relation that when.

the pinions are arrested by engagement of the long teeth of the pinion 774 with the teeth 81.6 of the spacing strip 770 in negative total-taking, the thus established negative 0 positions of the pinions are identical with their positive 9 positions, that is, the long teeth of the pinions 775 are one tooth space counterclockwise from their positive 0 positions in which they are stopped by the blade 303 in positive total-taking.

Tens-transfer mechanism Whenever the totalizer 761 contains a previously accumulated amount and the machine is operated to add or subtract another amount in the totalizer, the necessity for a tens-transfer from the lower to the higher order of one or more pairs of successive orders may occur. In any such amount entering operation on the totalizer, the pinion 775 for any order from which a tens-transfer 5 should arise will pass through the interval between its 9 and 0 positions, in one direction in an adding operation or in the opposite direction in a subtracting operation. To enter the required tens-transfer on the next higher order pinion 775 whenever any pinion 775 is thus rotated through the interval between its 9 and 0 positions in either direction, such next high pinion 775 should be rotated through one tooth space in the same direction beyond the position in which it is left by the actuator rack for the same order.

The tens-transfer mechanism comprises, for each pair of adjacent orders, a set of parts controlled by the pinion 775 of the lower order and including a transfer segment acting upon the pinion 775 of the higher order to effect the necessary additive and subtractive tens-transfers. To properly position the individual elements of each of the sets of tens-transfer parts for successive orders and to provide support for certain of the transverse rods and shafts of the crossfooter structure, the pinion frame and the main frame of the crossfooter are each provided with a series of partition frame plates.

In the pinion frame (Figs. 3, 4 and 11), there is a series of equally laterally spaced vertical partition plates 817, each of which has its left face substantially in the plane of the right-hand face of a respective one of the pinions 775 when the latter are in their normal rightmost positions, excepting one additional partition plate 817 which is leftward of the highest order pinions. The leftmost and rightmost plates 817 and every third partition plate 817 inwardly from the rightmost and leftmost plates 817 are secured on collars 818 which are pinned on the shaft 767 while the two partition plates 817 intermediate each pair having such collars are merely apertured for support on the shaft 767 and are held in properly spaced relation by spacing strips M9.

Each spacing strip 819 is positioned lengthwise by engagement at its ends with the adjacent collars 81S and has two slots opening through its longitudinal edge remote from the shaft 767 to receive portions of two non-collared partition plates 817 outwardly from the outer ends of slots 820 cut in the latter. The slots 820 extend from the apertures receiving the shaft 767 outwardly to an extent sufficient to accommodate the pertions of the spacing strips 819 located between the shaft 767 and the inner ends of the notches in the spacing strips.

The rods 805 and 8% pass through all of the partition plates 817, each of which has at its upper rear end a lug received in a fitting slot in the spacing strip 769. Each of the collared partition plates 817 has on its lower rear portion a lug extending sufliciently under the shaft 862 to brace the latter against pressure from the long teeth of the pinion 775 in positive total-taking and subtotal-taking.

In the totalizer main frame (Figs. 1 and 2) is a series of equally laterally spaced partition plates 821 supported on the cross rods 763, 75 i and 765 which pass through fitting apertures in each of such partition plates. The plates 821 are held in properly spaced position by three spacing strips 822, 323 and 824 each extending along one of the cross rods 763, 764 or 765, respectively, with one longitudinal edge of the strip in contact with the rod and with the opposite ends of the strip abutting against the side plates 762. Each of the spacing strips $22, 823 and 824- has a series of equally spaced slots 825 out into it through the edge remote from the rod 763, 754 or 765 with which it is associated to receive portions of the partition plates 821 outwardly from the ends of slots 826 which are cut in the partition plates outwardly from the apertures through which the rods 76.3, 764 and 765 pass, such slots 326 in the partition plates receiving the portions of the spacing strips between rods and the bottoms of the slots 825 in said strips. The partition plates 817 and 821 support a number of rods and shafts upon which various bend of the slot parts of the tens-transfer mechanism are supported as hereinafter described.

As the individual elements of the set of tens-transfer parts controlled by the lower order pinion and acting upon the higher order pinion of two pinions 775 of successive orders is duplicated between each pinion 775 and the next higher or lower order pinion 775, the following description of one such set of tens-transfer parts will suffice for all such sets.

The transfer pawl controlled by the pinion 775 of the lower order is formed as a yoke 8Z7 (Figs. 5, 8 and 16) having its two side arms pivotally supported on the rod S05 closely adiacent the facing sides of two adjacent partition plates 817. The right-hand side arm of the yoke 827 carries a stud 823 having a deep annular groove through which pass the two normally parallel end portions oi t centering spring 829 coiled around the rod 8%. The ends of the spring 82? normally press against opposite sides of the rod 3&5 and normally yieldingly hold the axis of the stud 823 in the plane containing the axes of both of the rods 3% and 8%. With the yoke 827 thus normally positioned, the rear end of a pawl finger 830 extending rearwardly from the right-hand side arm of the yoke 2 527 is normally positioned in the path of the long tooth of the pinion 775 and midway between the positive 0 position and the positive 9 position of that tooth while the pinion is in the normal rightward position which it occupies in all adding and subtracting operations.

A forward and downward extension 831 of the righthand side arm of the yoke 827 carries a leftwardly projecting headed stud 832 which pivotally supports a small yoke 835. The right-hand side arm of the yoke 833 abuts against the downward extension 333. of the yoke 827 to space leftwardly a link which extends downwardly from the left-hand side of the yoke and a little to the left of a partition plate 82, The lower end of the link 834 has a longitudinally elongated slot embracing a stud 835 carried by a forwardly extending arm 836 of the right-hand side arm of a yolte pivoted on the shaft 33 close to the left face of the last-mentioned partition plat 52.1 and the right-hand face of the next partition plate 321 to the left. The shaft 533 is supported in the partition plates 521 and at its ends in the side plates 762 and suitably retained therein. The left-hand side of the yoke 837 has an upwardly extending director arm 84% and a somewhat Y-shaped arm so in which is a slot 642 of inverted L-shape with its legs extending downwardly and forwardly, respectively, from their juncture. In the .a, there is normally positioned a stud 343 which has a darneter substantially less than the width of the slot and which is carried by a downward branch 344 of a rearward arm 345 on the left end of a yoke 55% which is pivotally supported on the shaft 2547 supported in the partition plates 821 and side plates 762.

The rearward end of the arm 845 carries a stud 848 which extends through a somewhat pear-shaped slot 849 in a transfer segment 850 which meshes with the higher order pinion 775 while the pinions are in normal posi tion. The transfer segment 851i extends upwardly integrally from the left side of a yoke 851 pivotally supported on the shaft 833 so that the transfer segment 850 is immediately to the right of the arm 840. The arm 845 is urged clockwise by a tension spring 852 (Fig. 5) connected between the arm S45 and the spacing strip 824. A latch 853, engaging under a downwardly extending and leftwardly bent lug $5 4 on the arm 845, normally holds the latter in a position such that the stud 843 is in a narrow upper part of the slot 84? and the stud 84-3 is in the elbow of the slot 84-2. The latch arm 853 extends downwardly from the left side of a yolte 855 which is pivoted on a shaft 856 supported in the partition plates 821 and in the side plates 762.

Extending downwardly from the right-hand side of the yoke 855 is an arm 858 having in its lower end portion 'a forwardly open wide V-sh; ped notch forming two for- 'wardly diverging cam edges $59 and 36-9. The yoke 855 and its arms 35?: and 358 are urged clockwise by a tension spring 361 connected between a lateral lug on the arm 858 and the spacing strip 824, so that a stud 862, carried by the lower end portion of the link $34 forwardly of the slot therein and normally located in the apex of the V-notch in the arm 85%, is engaged by both cam edges 859 and 86%.

It should be noted that the pivotal connection between the yoke 827 and the link 2334 is normally centered very close to a line between the centers of the shaft 767 and of the stud 835 so that the rocking of the pinion frame, in which the yoke 327 is carried, about the shaft 767 to move the pinions into and out of mesh with the actuators 511 and 519 merely rocks the link 83 about the stud 835 through a small angle without significantly raising or lowering the link 8343 and stud 362 relative to the stud 835 and arm 853.

Additive tens-transfers In adding, the actuator racks rotate the pinions 775 clockwise as previously explained and, if a pinion 775 for any order lower thtan the highest order is rotated clockwise through the interval between its 9 and positions, so that an additive tens-transfer to the next higher order pinion 775 is required, the long tooth of the lower order pinion 775 will engage and move past the pawl finger 830, lifting the latter and rocking the yoke 827 counter clockwise to the position shown in Fig. and then releasing the finger 830 and permitting the spring 829 to return the yoke 827 and finger 839 to normal. The yoke 827, rocking counterclockwise on the rod 895, lowers the link 834, depressing the stud 862 while taking up the play of the stud 835 in the slot in the link $34 and then rocking the yoke 837 counterclockwise to move the upper end of the arm 84% slightly forward of the stud 848.

As the stud 862 is depressed, it acts on the lower cam edge 866 on the arm 858 and, as the link 834 and stud 862 are guided by the stud 835, the stud 362 cams the arm 858 rearwardly and rocks the yoke 355 to retract the latch 853 from under the lug 2554, thereby releasing the yoke 846 for movement clockwise by the spring 852. However, until the pinions 77 5 are lowered and ire-engaged with the transfer segments 850, the clockwise movement of the transfer actuator yoke 846 is limited by engagement of the forward edge of an arm $63 extending downwardly from the left-hand end of the yoke 846 against a bail rod 864 supported in the lower ends of three links 865 (Fig. 1) each secured to a collar pinned to a shaft 866 journalled at its ends in bushings 867 secured in the side plates 762.

The shaft 866 is retained against longitudinal displacement by removable spring clips bearing outwardly against the bushings 867 and engaged in annular grooves in the shaft 866. The bail rod 864 is retained against longitudinal displacement by removable spring clips bearing outwardly against the right and left links 365 and engaged in annular grooves in the bail rod. The right and left links 865 have rearwardly extending and outwardly bent lugs 868, which, while the pinions are in their upper positions where they are meshed with the actuator racks, are engaged behind latch shoulders on the forward portions of latch bell cranks 869 (Figs. 5 and 12) secured on hubs rotatably supported on the shaft 838, the end portions of which pass through arcuate slots, formed in the arms 799, and into the end plates 762.

The latch bell cranks 869 and their hubs are confined against movement outwardly along the shaft 838 by the arms 799. The left-hand bell crank 369 is prevented from moving inwardly along the shaft 838 by a stop collar 870 secured on the shaft 838 by a screw and the righthand bell crank 869 is prevented from moving inwardly along the shaft 838 by a spring clip 871 engaging in an annular groove in the shaft. The latch bell cranks 869 are urged clockwise to latching position by springs 872 connected between the forward arms of the latch bell cranks and the shaft 856.

While the pinions are upward and meshed with the ac tuator racks, the latches permit only a slight forward movement of the bail 864 and the arm 863 which is sufiicient to permit the lug 854 on the transfer actuator yoke 346 to move down in front of the latch projection on the latch 853 and prevent the latter from relatching the yoke 846 as the link 834 and yoke 827 are returned to normal by the spring 829 when the long tooth of the pinion 775 releases the pawl finger 83th. The initial movement of the yoke 846 moves the stud 843 slightly out of the elbow of the slot 842 and into the forward branch thereof and also moves the stud 848 to the lower end of the narrow upper part of the slot 849 in the transfer segment 850 and into engagement with the rear upper corner of the arm 846 so that the yoke 837 is retained in its set position but the transfer segment S is not rocked from its normal position for accurate meshing with the higher order pinion 775 when the latter is again lowered to normal position.

As the cam arms 799 approach the end of their counterclockwise return movement and the pinions 775 have been again meshed with the transfer segments 850, each of the arms 799 engages a stud 873 (Figs. 5 and 6) secured in the upper arm of the respecitve latch bell crank 869 and rocks the latch counterclockwise to release the arms 855 and bail rod 864 to permit the transfer actuator yoke 84d to be swung by its spring 852 to the limit of its clockwise movement. In the initial portion of such movement of the yoke 23%, the stud 848, acting on the rear edge or" the director arm see, cams the latter forwardly toward a stud 374 secured in the transfer segment 850 forwardiy of the upper end of the arm 840. Still early in the clockwise movement of the yoke 346, the stud 843 acts upon the lower edge of the forward branch of the slot 842 to continue the counterclockwise movement of the yoke 337 so that the arm S40, acting on the stud 87 i, rocks the transfer segment 850 forwardly one tooth space and rotates the higher order pinion 775 clockwise one tooth space to add a unit on that pinion.

The additive transfer movement of the segment 8'59 and the driving movement of the yoke 846 are limited by engagement of the upper forward edge of the segment against a stop rod 875 supported in the partition plates 821 and held against endwise displacement by spring 2 clips engaged in circumferential grooves in the end portions of the rod 875 and bearing against the outer sides of the outermost partition plates 821. The parts remain in such position until, in a following adding, subtracting, total-taking or subtotal-taking operation, the pinions are again raised out of mesh with the transfer segments 850 and into mesh with the actuator racks.

Two links 876 (Figs. 5, 6, 8 and 9) are pivoted at their rear ends on studs secured in the two arms 799 respectively. Each link 876 has in its forward portion a longitudinally elongated slot through which the bail rod 864' passes. Each link 876 carries a screw 877 which passes through the forward end of the link just forwardly of the end of the slot in which the rod 864 is located and has a large eccentric head on one side of the link. A nut is threaded on the screw 877 on the other side of the link 876 whereby the screw may be secured in the link with the eccentric head in the desired position of rotary adjustment such that, when the arms 799 have swung clockwise far enough to lift the pinions 775 out of mesh with the transfer segments 850, the heads of the screws 877 swing the bail rod 864 against the arm 863 of the released transfer actuator yoke 846 and, in the remaining part of the clockwise movement of the arms 799, pull the bail rod 864 rearwardly far enough to return the yoke 846 sufficiently past its normal position to permit the shouldered end of the latch 353 to engage under the lug to relatch the yoke 846. In such return movement of the yoke 846, the stud 8 is elevated into the narrow top portion of the slot 349 and thus restores the transfer segment 35%) to normal position. The stud 843 also is returned to the elbow of the slot 842 and thus restores the yoke $37 and director arm 340 to normal position.

During the counterclockwise swinging of the bail 864 and links 2555, the lugs 868 are carried over and a short distance beyond the latch shoulders on the latch bell cranks 869. As soon as the arms 799 reach the end of their clockwise movement, they are, as explained in detail in my original and continuation-in-part applications Serial Nos. 85,971 and 174,69, returned a short distance counterclockwise to permit the bail rod 864? and links 365 to move forwardly far enough to engage the lugs 863 against the latch shoulders of the latches 869. The parts are then again in normal condition and ready for another tens-transfer operation. Such restoring of the parts is completed prior to any rotation of the totalizer pinions by the actuator racks so that a transfer cannot be lost by reason of the transfer pawl finger 83f: being rocked and released by the long tooth of the lower order pinion 775 passing it before the bail rod 354 is positioned, as in Fig. to permit the lug of the transfer actuator 193-: yoke to move and remain downwardly far enough to prevent relatching by the latch 853.

Subtractive tens-transfer When an amount is subtracted on the totalizer, the pinions 775', as previously explained, are rotated counterclockwise during the forward movement of the actuator racks. While considering the same single set of tenstransfer parts hereinabove discussed, it will be assumed that the lower order one of the pinions 775 of the same two adjacent orders is rotated subtractively through the interval between its positive 0 and 9 positions while the pinions are in their elevated positions meshing with the actuator racks so that a subtractive tens-transfer to the higher order pinion 775 should be effected.

The long tooth of the lower order pinion 775, in passing from its positive 9 to its positive 9 position, depresses the pawl finger 83f) rocking the yoke 827 to elevate the link 834. The raising of the link 3254 first takes up the play of the stud in the siot in the lower end of link 834 and then rocks the yoke 3357 clockwise to move the upper end of the director arm 84 t rearwardly of the stud 848 as illustrated in Fig. 8. in the upward movement of the link on the stud 835, the stud 362 acts on the upper cam surface of the arm S58 and cams the latter rearwardiy, rocking the yoke 855 counterclockwise to withdraw the latch 853 from under the lug 854, thereby permitting the transfer actuator yoke 846 to rock clockwise a short distance until the lower end of the arm E563 presses against the bail rod 864 and lugs 86?; press against the shoulders of the latches 369. Such rocking of the yoke lowers the lug 854 sufficiently to prevent relatching of the yoke 84-6 by the latch $53. The stud moves downwardly to the lower end of the upper arrow portion of the slot 849 and in front of the forward upper corner of the director arm 84% while the stud 3&3 moves a short distance into the downward branch of the slot 34-2.

As the long tooth of the lower order pinion 775 moves to its positive 9 position, it releases the pawl finger 5539 and permits the spring 329 to return the yoke 827 and link 834 to normal position, but the transfer actuator yoke 846 remains stationary in its unlatched position with its lug 354' blocking restoration of the latch 353. The transfer parts remain in such position until, after the forward movement of the actuator racks has been completed, the arms 79? swinging forwardly, iOWCl' the pinions toward their normal positions. During their forward movement, the arms 799 engage the stud 873 and, after the pinions 775 have meshed with the transfer segment 850, the latches 869 are rocked sufiiciently to release the lugs 868 on the links 865 to free the bail rod 864 for forward movement. At this point, the spring 852 rocks the transfer actuator yoke 846 clockwise. In the initial portion of such movement, the stud 848 acts on the forward edge of the upper end of the director arm 840 to earn the latter toward a stud 878 secured in the transfer segment 850 rearward of the arm 340. After a very small movement, the stud 843 acts on the forward edge of the downward branch of the slot 842 in the arm 841 and continues the clockwise movement of the yoke 837 so that the director arm 340, acting against the stud 378, rocks the transfer segment d rcarwardly until arrested by engagement against the cross rod 763 when the transfer segment 359 has moved through exactly one tooth space and has rotated the higher order pinion 7'75 one tooth space counterclockwise, that is, in the subtractive direction, and has thus entered a subtractive tens-transfor on the higher order pinion 775.

The parts remain in such position until, in the next adding, subtracting, total-taking or subtotal-taking operation, the totalizer pinions are again elevated into mesh with the actuator racks at which time the parts are restored to normal in precisely the same manner as following an additive tens-transfer, except, of course, that the yoke 837 and the transfer segment 850 are returned in the reverse direction to their normal positions.

Run-through transfers Only a single set of tens-transfer parts to effect additive and subtractive tens-transfers from the lower order pinion 775 to the higher order pinion 775 of a single pair of adjacent pinions 775 has been described above. However, a duplicate of such set of tens-transfer parts is provided between each two adjacent pinions 775 so that the number of sets of parts provided for effecting tenstransfer from order to order in the crossfooter is one less. than the number of pinions 775, disregarding the fugitive 1 mechanism, to be described hereinafter, which includes some parts which are the same as, or similar to, parts of the tens-transfer mechanism proper. The tens-transfer mechanism is thus capable of effecting an additive or subtractive tens-transfer to the next higher order from any order where the relation of the added or subtracted digit to the digit previously standing on the pinion 775 for that order requires an additive or a sub tractive tens-transfer to the next higher order.

The foregoing discussions of additive and subtractive tens-transfers has mentioned only transfers resulting from rotation of pinions 775 by and during their engagement with the actuator racks. It may, however, occur in adding operations that a pinion 775 standing at its positive 9 position as it is unmeshed from its actuator rack 511 or 519 and remeshed with its transfer segment 85!) is rotated from its positive 9 position to its positive 0 position by the transfer segment 850 as a tens-transfer is transmitted to it. In subtracting operations, it may happen that a pinion 775 which stands at its positive 0 position as it is unmeshed from its actuator rack and lowered into mesh with its transfer segment 850, is rotated from its positive 0 position to its positive 9 position by its transfer segment as a subtractive tens-transfer is transmitted to it.

In either case, the long tooth of the pinion 775 so rotated through the interval between its 0 and 9 positions in either direction by its transfer segment $59 after it has meshed with the latter, will act upon the associated transfer pawl finger 830 to rock the yoke 827 and move the link 834 to set the director yoke 837 with its arms 849 and 841 to the proper position and trip the latch 853 to release the transfer actuator yoke 846 to rock the transfer segment 850 meshing with the next higher order pinion 775. Such actions of the parts are just as hereinabove described except that as the latches 869 have already been tripped by the arms 799, the bail rod 864- will not arrest the transfer actuator yokes 846 in me initial transfer position as previously described, but will permit them immediately to complete their full movement and immediately rock the associated transfer segment 850 to immediately enter an additive or a subtractive tens-transfer as required upon the pinion 775 on the next higher order. In this manner, whenever required, tenstransfers may be effected progressively from order to order through as many orders as required.

It will be apparent that when 1 is subtracted on the totalizer at a time when the pinions stand in the positions in which they were left by a positive total-taking operation (that is, with all of the pinions 775 in their positive 0 positions), the units order pinion 775, rotating from its positive 0 to its positive 9 position, will rock the associated transfer pawl finger 830 downwardly to set up an initial transfer condition in the set of transfer parts controlling the transfer segment 850 for the tens order pinion 775 while the pinions 775 remain meshed with the actuator racks. Then, when the pinions 775 are lowered and remeshed with their transfer segments 858, the tens order pinion will be rotated from its positive 0 position to its positive 9 position by its transfer segment 859 and will act upon the associated transfer pawl finger 830 to cause, immediately, a full subtractive tens-transfer operation of the next higher order set of transfer parts whereby the hundreds order pinion 775 will be rotated by its transfer segment from its positive 0 to its positive 9 position. The same action will be repeated from order to order all the way to the highest order and all of the .r

pinions 775 from the tens order to the highest order will be successively rotated by their transfer segments 850 from their positive I) to their positive 9 positions.

Similarly, when 1 is added in the units order at a time when the crossfooter pinions stand in the position in which they were left by a negative total-taking operation, that is, when the pinions 775 stand in their negative 0 or positive 9 positions, a run-through additive carry from order to order to the highest order will similarly be effected, excepting that the pinions will be rotated in the subtractive direction.

Preventing accidental rotations of pinions To prevent accidental rotation of the pinions while they are in their lower positions after the pinions 774 and 10) which is aligned with the middle tooth of the adjacent transfer segment 850 when the latter is in its normal position and engages between teeth of the corresponding pinion 775 when the latter is in its leftward negative total-taking position while the pinion frame is in its normal lower position.

To prevent accidental rotation of the pinions while the pinions are being raised and lowered to engage them with the actuator racks and the transfer segments alternately, a bailrod 888 (Figs. 3, 4 and 5), extending from side to side of the pinion frame at the rear of the pinions 774, is supported at its ends in the rear arms of a pair of three-armed levers 881 pivotally mounted on studs 882 which are secured in the rear ends of the ends plates 766 and project outwardly therefrom. The bail rod 880 is urged toward the pinions 774 by two tension springs 883 each connected with a respective end of the bail rod 880 and with a stud secured in the respective end plate 766.

The bail rod 888 is normally, that is, while the pinion frame is in its lower position, held rearwardly of the pinions 774 by engagement of the forward arms of the levers 881 against the upper sides of the ends of the rod 763, but when the pinion frame carrying the levers 881 is elevated the springs 883 rock the levers 881 to engage the rod 889 between teeth of the pinions 774 before the pinions 775 are unmeshed from the transfer segments 850 or teeth 879. The rod 888 remains in position between teeth of the pinions 774 until after the pinions 775 or 774 are well meshed with the actuator racks, at which time, rearwardly directed cam ends of the lower arms of the levers 881 engage against the undersides of a pair of studs 884 secured in the side plates 762 and projecting inwardly therefrom. During the final portion of the upward movement of the pinions, the studs 384 cam the levers 881 clockwise to disengage the rod 880 from between the teeth of the pinions 774.

When the pinions are again lowered to normal position the reverse action takes place, that is, as the rear ends of the end plates 766 carrying the levers 881 are lowered, the studs 884 permit the springs 883 to reengage the rod 880 between the teeth of the pinions 774 and then, after the pinions 775 are again well meshed with the transfer segments 850 or the teeth 879, rear arms of the levers 881 re-engage the rod 763 and are thereby rocked to retract the rod 880 from the pinions 774. The studs 882 are so positioned that the rod 880, while engaged between the teeth of the pinions 774, holds the pinions in position for accurate meshing with the actuator racks and with the transfer segments.

"Fugitive 1 mechanism It is well known that, in the operation of a machine in which a true negative total is taken and printed in a direct total-taking operation instead of indirectly by complement-converting operations, an error of 1 would be present in the total obtained each time the totalizer, in accumulating a negative total, started with its accumulating pinions in their positive 0 positions (the positions in which they are left by a positive total-taking operation) or, in accumulating a positive total, started with its accumulating pinions in their negative 0 positions (the positions in which they are left by a direct negative total-taking operation and identical with their positive 9 positions), unless special provisions are present to avoid or to correct the error. Such error has become generally known as the fugutive 1 error and mechanism for correcting the error within the totalizer mechanism itself so that a correct total, whether positive or negative, is always obtainable from the totalizer, has become generally known as fugitive 1 mechanism. The fugitive 1 mechanism of the above-described totalizer is constructed as next described.

The long tooth of the highest order pinion 775 (Figs. 12, 13 and 14) cooperates with a fugitive l pawl finger 830 of a yoke 827 which is identical with the previously described yokes 827 and is supported on the rod 805 between the last two partition plates 817 at the left side of the crossfooter. This last-mentioned fugitive l yoke 827 is also biased to normal position by a spring 829 like the other springs 829 and similarly arranged. However, the stud 832 on the extension 831 of the fugitive 1 yoke 827 pivotally supports the upper yoke-formed end of a short link 885 which extends downwardly on the left side of the last partition plate 821 at the left side of the crossfooter. The lower end of the link 885 pivotally embraces a stud secured in the rear end of an arm 886 which is secured to a hub pinned to a shaft 887 which passes through and is supported in all of the partition plates 821. The shaft 887 is retained against axial displacement by the hub of the arm 886 bearing against the left side of the leftmost partition plate 821 and a spring clip engaging in an annular groove in the right-hand end of the shaft 887 and bearing against the right side of the rightmost partition plate 821.

At the left side of the rightmost partition plate 821, a hub pinned on the shaft 887 is secured to an arm 883 which, at its rear end, pivotally connects with a link 889. The link 889 has in its lower portion a slot receiving the stud 835 secured in the right-hand side arm of a fugitive 1 director yoke 837 which is in all respects like the previously described yokes 837; The lower portions of the link 889 forwardly of the stud 835 also carries a stud 862 which cooperates wit-h cam edges 859 and 860 of the right-hand arm 858 of a fugitive 1 latch yoke 855 which is in all respects like the previously described latch yokes 855. The latch arm 853 at the left-hand end of the fugitive l latch yoke 855 cooperates with a lug 854 on a fugitive 1 actuator yoke 890 (Fig. 14) which is like the previously described yokes 846 except that the yoke portion thereof is somewhat differently arranged and proportioned so that the right-hand side portion thereof is rockably mounted on the shaft 847- rightwardly of and close to the rightmost partition plate 821 and has a rearwardly extending arm 891. On the rearward end of the arm 891 is a leftwardly turned lug 892 which is of a shallow inverted V-shaped fore-and-aft vertical cross section and is positioned between the upper arms of a pair of latch members 893 and 894 secured to hubs rotatable on the shaft 838 and confined longitudinally of the shaft between the first partition plate 821 at the right and a spring clip engaged in a groove in the shaft. A tension spring 895, connected between downward arms of the latch members 893 and 894, urges the upper arms of the latch members toward the lug 892 and toward each other.

A stud 896 extends rightwardly from the arm 888 and between forward arms of the latches 893 and 894, the latter arms being also urged toward each other and toward the stud 896 by the spring 895. While the fugitive 1 actuator yoke S90 is in its normal latched position, the lower front and rear edges of the lug 892 are located slightly higher than the upper edges of latch shoulders formed on the adjacent sides of the upper arms of the two latch members 293 and 894.

The lowest order pinion 775 normally meshes with a fugitive 1 segment 897 which is like the previously described transfer segments 856 except that the right side of its yoke portion has an upwardly extending arm 898 having in its upper end a stud 89 9 extending ri'ghtwardly through a forwardly and rearwardly elongated slot in a link 900 which is normally freely slidable forwardly and rearwardly on the stud 899 but laterally confined thereon between the arm 898 and a spring clip (not shown) engaged in an annular groove in the stud on the right-hand side of the link 99.0. The link 90!! has on its front upper portion a lug 901 extending rightwardly between the upper ends of the upper arms of the latch members 893 and 894 above the lug 892.

The rearward end of the link 9041 is pivotally connected with a downward arm on the left end of a yoke 902 pivoted on the inward portion of a stud 993 passing through and secured to the right side main frame plate 27. The yoke 902 has at its right-hand end a forward arm carrying a stud 904 extending through the plate 27 and engaged in a notch in a forward portion of a slide 995 slidable vertically on a reduced end portion of a stud 9% and on a stud 997. The slide 9% is retained on the studs 996 and 917 by headed screws threaded into the latter which are in turn secured in the side plate 27. The slide 905 carries a leftwardly projecting stud 908 which is engaged by a forwardly pointed bluntly V- shapcd nose of a detent pawl 999 pivoted on the stud 997 between the slide 995 and the machine frame plate 27 and spring-urged forwardly to press its V-nose against the stud 998.

The stud 896 is normally in a middle position such that it does not block either of the latch members 393 and 894 from positioning its latch shoulder under the lug However, because of the action of the detent pawl on the stud 998, the lug 991 is normally yieldingly held at one or the other of its forward and rearward limits so that it holds either the latch memher 894 or the latch member 393 from positioning its latch shoulder under the lug 392.

As is well understood by those skilled in this art, eachtime the sign of the total obtained in an adding and subtracting totalizer mechanism changes from positive to negative, the highest order totalizer pinion moves in the subtracting direction through the interval between its positive 0 and positive 9 position, and every time the sign of the total changes from negative to positive, the highest order pinion moves in the adding direction through the interval between its positive 9 and positive 0 positions.

As the highest order pinion 7'75 rotates in the subtractive direction through the interval between its positive 0 and positive 9 positions, the long tooth thereof engages and depresses fugitive 1 pawl finger S39 cooperating therewith thereby elevating the link 885 and rocking the arm 8S6, shaft $87 and arm 823 counterclockwise thereby elevating both the fugitive l stud 362 and the stud 896. The rising link 889 also acts upon the stud 835 of the fugitive l yoke 837 and positions the latter in the same manner that the other yokes 837 are positioned for subtractive tens-transfers.

The upwardly moving stud 862 rocks the fugitive l' latch 853 to release the lug 85% of the fugitive l actuator yoke 891) for the fugitive 1 segment 897 and the upwardly moving stud 89 6 rocks the latch member 393 clockwise, moving its shoulder rearwardly clear of the lug 892. At this time, because of the totalizer having previously contained a positive total, the lug 901 is in its forward position holding thelatch member 894 for-.

wardly with its latch shoulder clear of the lug 892 so that the yoke 899 is then free to be moved clockwise by its spring 852, at least sufficiently to prevent relatching thereof by either the latch 853 or the latch $94. The yoke 89% is controlled by the bail 364 in the same manner as are the yokes 346.

With the fugitive 1 director yoke 3-37 in the subtractive position as above-mentioned, the studs 848 and 843 of the fugitive i actuator 89%, when they move downwardly, will rock rearwardly the fugitive 1 segment 897 meshing with the lowest order pinion 775, whereby the latter is rotated one tooth space in the subtractive direction, thereby correcting the fugitive 1 error which would otherwise be present in the negative total contained in the totalizer. The arm 89S rocking rearwardly with the fugitive 1 segment 897 moves the link 9'90 rearwardly, thereby depressing the stud 904 and the slide 995 Which moves the stud 908 downwardly past the V-nose of the detent pawl 909 which thereafter yieldingly holds the slide 905 in its lowermost position and the link 9% in its rearward position where the lug 99,1 en ages. and holds the latch member 893 rearwardly with its latch shoulder clear of the lug 892.

The fugitive 1 actuator yoke $99 and segment 897 for the units order pinion 775 are restored by the bail rod 864 in the same manner and at the Same time the latter restores the transfer actuator yokes 846 and transfer segments 350. As the fugitive 1 actuator yoke 89%, is restored to normal, the lug 892 is elevated to its normal position and permits the latch shoulder on the latch member 89- to move to latching position under it.

if, before the highest order pinion 775 is rotated in the adding direction through the interval between its positive 9 and positive 0 positions, it should again be rotated in the subtractive direction through the interval between its 0 and 9 positions in consequence of accumulation of a negative total greater than the capacity of the totalizer, the long tooth of the highest order pinion 775 will again depress the pawl finger 830 cooperating therewith and again elevate the link 385, rotate the arm 886,

shaft 887 and arm 588 counterclockwise and again elevate the stud 896, link 389 and stud 862 The rising link 889 will again set the director yoke 837 for the fugitive 1 segment 897 in subtractive position and the rising stud 862 will again rock the latch 853 to release the lug 854.

However, the rising stud 896 will not release the lug 892 because the latch 893 is already held in its rearward positron by the lug 901, but the latch shoulder of the latch member 894 is under the lug 892 to prevent an erroneous entry of a subtractive fugitive l correction into the crossfooter when the sign of the total contained therein has not changed.

If there is now added into the totalizer an amount greater than the negative total contained therein so that the sign of the accumulated total is changed, the long tooth of the highest order pinion 775, moving in the adding direction, will engage and elevate the pawl finger 830 cooperating therewith, thereby depressing the link 885, rocking the arm 886, shaft 887 and arm 888 clockwise and depressing the link 889, stud 862 and stud 896. The downwardly moving link 889 acts on the stud 835 of the fugitive 1 director yoke 837 to position the latter in the additive position. The downwardly moving stud 862 rocks the fugitive 1 latch 853 to release the lug 854 of the fugitive 1 actuator yoke 890 and the downwardly moving stud 896 engages the forward arm of the latch member 894 rocking the latter counterclockwise and moving its latch shoulder forwardly clear of the lug 892. When the yoke 890 moves clockwise, the downwardly moving studs 848 and 843 rock the fugitivel segment 897 forwardly to rotate the lowest order pinion 775 one tooth space in the adding direction to thereby correct the fugitive 1 error which otherwise would be present in the positive total contained in the totalizer.

As the fugitive 1 segment 897 rocks forwardly, the arm 898 pulls the link 900 forwardly, thereby elevating the stud 904 and the slide 905 which moves its stud 908 upwardly across the V-nose of the detent pawl 909 which thereafter yieldingly holds the stud 908 and the slide 905 in their upper positive total positions. The lug 901 on the link 900 moving forwardly engages the upper end of the latch member 894 and, until the total in' the totalizer again becomes negative, holds the latch member 894 for wardly with its latch shoulder clear of the lug 892. However, as the fugitive 1 actuator yoke 890 and segment 897 are restored to normal as previously mentioned, the lug 892 is again moved upwardly to its normal position and the latch shoulder on the latch member 893, now no longer engaged by the lug 901, moves under the lug 892.

If further additions result in the accumulation of a positive total exceeding the capacity of the totalizer, the highest order pinion 775 will again move in the adding direction through the interval between its 9 and positions, again elevating the fugitive 1 pawl finger 830 and depressing the link 889, stud 862 and stud 896. However, the downwardly moving stud 896 will not act upon the latch member 893 which now holds the lug 892 of the fugitive 1 actuator yoke 890 elevated so that a fugitive 1 correction will not erroneously be entered into the crossfooter when the sign of the total therein is not changed.

It will be seen that the above-described fugitive l mechanism is effective to enter a fugitive 1 correction into the totalizer each time the sign of the total accumulated therein changes from positive to negative or from negative to positive, the additive or subtractive character of the correction being controlled and determined solely by the direction of movement of the long tooth on the highest order pinion as it acts upon the fugitive 1 pawl finger 830. It will also be seen that the fugitive 1 mechanism has provisions which prevent the erroneous entry of a fugitive l correction into the totalizer when the capacity of the totalizer is exceeded.

It will further be noted that the parts designated 900 to 908, inclusive, are automatically moved from one to the other of two positions upon each change of sign of the total in the totalizer and that the slide 905 always occupies its upper position when the totalizer contains a positive total and always occupies its lower position when the totalizer contains a negative total. Such positioning of the slide 905 in accordance with the sign of the total contained in the totalizer may be utilized for an automatic control of means for rocking the lever 788 prior to the meshing of the pinions with the actutor racks in total-taking and subtotal-taking operations to position the pinions 775 or 774 in alignment for meshing with the actuator racks automatically in accordance with the positive or negative sign of the total. Such an automatic control is disclosed in detail in my original and continuation-impart application Serial Nos. 85,971 and 174,696, the latter having become Patent No. 2,629,549.

It is to be noted that the transfer mechanism performs both additive and subtractive tens-transferring and that the conditioning and control of the transfer mechanism to determine whether. additive tens-transferring or subtractive tens-transferring will be performed thereby during any individual operation of the totalizer, is controlled e and effected solely by the long teeth of the pinions 775 in accordance with their additive or subtractive directions of movement when they act on the pawlfingers 830 to initiate tens-transfers. No other control or conditioning of the tens-transfer mechanism is required to determine whether the tens-transfers will be additive or subtractive as needed.

The tens-transfer mechanism is of the type comprising tens-transfer segments independent of the amount actuator racks of the machine so that tens-transferring is not dependent upon extra movements of the actuator racks to effect tens-transfer. Thus, an amount set up on the keyboard of the machine may be entered simultaneously into a plurality of totalizers having different previously accumulated amounts therein or entered simultaneously in opposite alegebraic senses in a plurality of totalizers. The tens-transfer segments, nevertheless, are not moved from their normal positions and thus not displaced from accurate registration with the teeth of the totalizer pinions when tens-transfer operations are initiated during the rotation of the pinions while they are engaged with the actuator racks of the machine and disengaged from the tens-transfer segments, Thus, when the totalizer pinions are returned into mesh with the transfer segments, they are in accurate meshing registry with the latter and are not required to be rotated to any extent during the meshing engagement of the pinions with the transfer segments.

Although primary tens-transfers which are set up or initiated during the rotation of the totalizer pinions by the actuator racks of the machine while the pinions are engaged with the latter, may, when they are completed after the pinions have been unmeshed from the actuator racks and meshed with the tens-transfer segments, give rise to secondary tens-transfers which may sometimes result in what are known as run-through transfers from order to order all the way to the highest order, these secondary tens-transfers, even when they involve run-through transfers, are effected extremely rapidly by the mechanism described above. Thus objections to prior types of tens-transfer mechanisms not requiring extra steps of movements of the actuator racks to eflfect tens-transfers have been overcome.

I claim:

1. In a calculating machine adapted to be driven through cycles of operation, a plural order set of differential actuators, a totalizer mechanism including a plurality order set of transfer members and a plural order set of totalizing pinions connectible alternately with said differential actuators and with said transfer members and each having a transfer control element, and means to effect connection of said pinions with said differential actuators for rotation of said pinions by said actuators in one direction in adding and in the reverse direction in subtracting and to subsequently connect said pinions with said transfer members, said transmembers having a normal position from which they are individually movable in one direction to effect additive transfer and in the opposite direction to effect subtractive transfers, a moving means for each transfer member to effect transfer movements thereof, a director means for each transfer member settable to determine the direction of movement of said transfer member from its normal position by its moving means, and control means for each transfer member movable by the transfer control element of the pinion of next lower order in accordance with the direction of movement of the latter as it moves through a predetermined position to set said director means to determine the directions of movement of the transfer member and to condition said moving means to effect a transfer movement of said transfer member in the so determined direction.

2. A mechanism according to claim 1, and wherein the control means movable by the transfer element of the highest order pinion has means for setting the director element and conditioning the moving means for the transfer member for the lowest order pinion.

3. In a calculating machine adapted to be driven through cycles of operation, a plural order set of differential actuators, a totalizer mechanism including a plural order set of totalizing pinions including 21 highest order pinion having a fugitive l correction control element, and a lowest order pinion, a fugitive l correction entering member, and means to connect said pinions with said differential actuators for rotation thereby in one I direction in adding and in the reverse direction in subtracting and to subsequently disconnect said pinions from said actuators and connect said lowest order pinion with said fugitive 1 correction entering member, said member having a normal position from which it is movable in one direction to effect additive correction and in the opposite direction to effect subtractive correction, a moving means for said entering member to effect correction entering movements thereof, a director means for said member settable to determine the direction of movement of said member by its moving means, and control means movable by the control element of the highest order pinion in accordance with the direction of movement of the latter as it moves through a predetermined position to set said director means to determine the directions of movement of the correction entering member and to condition said moving means to effect a correction entering movement of said member in the determined direction.

4. A mechanism according to claim 3, and further comprising a means settable to either of two conditions by said correction entering member as it performs correction entering movements in respective ones of said two directions, and means conditioned by said settable means, when set by such entering movement of the correction entering member in either of said directions, to prevent a succeeding correction entering movement of said member except in the other of said directions.

5. A mechanism according to claim 3, and further comprising a control output means operable in two ways, and means controlled by said entering member to operate said control output means in said two ways alternately in accordance with alternation of direction of successive correction entering movements of said member.

6. Transfer mechanism for a totalizer having, in each order, a pinion rotated in one direction in adding and in the reverse direction in subtracting, and comprising for each span of two pinions of successive orders, a transfer member cooperable with the pinion of higher order and movable from a normal position in one direction to impart an additive transfer and in the opposite direction to impart a subtractive transfer to said pinion of higher order, a transfer actuator operable to impart either additive or subtractive transfer movement to said transfer member, a director settable to two positions relative to said transfer member and transfer actuator such that the latter, upon operation when the director is set in its additive transfer position, imparts additive transfer movement to said transfer member, but upon operation when the director is set in its subtractive transfer position, imparts subtractive transfer movement to said transfer member, a transfer control element movable with the lower order pinion in the rotations of the latter in the adding and subtracting directions, and a setting member engageable by said transfer 'control element and movable thereby in either an additive transfer direction or a'subtractive transfer direction as determined solely by the direction of movement of said element, and means operable by said setting member upon movement of the latter in its additive transfer direction to set said director to its additive transfer position and upon movement of said setting member in its subtractive transfer direction to set said director to its subtractive transfer position.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,503,800 Christian Apr. 11, 1950

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2503800 *Jul 21, 1944Apr 11, 1950The National Cash Register Company DA christian
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3000561 *Dec 12, 1955Sep 19, 1961Underwood CorpTen key adding and subtracting machine
US3029014 *Jul 20, 1953Apr 10, 1962_ IngCapellaro
US3102688 *Feb 2, 1960Sep 3, 1963Monroe g Calculating Machine CompanySimultaneous tens transfer and fugitive one mechanisms
US3655953 *Jun 4, 1969Apr 11, 1972Realty Ind CorpCarry mechanisms for calculating machines
US4084080 *Sep 28, 1976Apr 11, 1978Mcmahan William TTowel heater and dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification235/137
Cooperative ClassificationG06C15/26